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A. Farenden

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Slightly less coherent than books 1-3

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-01-15

There is more of a gearshift from book 3 than there was from book 2 to 3, and it seemed slightly discordant once or twice. "Wilkes" previously a very somber character with a fairly stern parental tone in all conversations, suddenly in this book is jocular and, having been reduced from secondary character to background, is acting like a random 30-something. I'm not sure if it's the lines as written or the delivery, but it was jarring in spots. Even so, I enjoyed the book and look forward to any sequel that may come.

My one "re-listen" ! Zombie-free Apocalypse

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-13

Would you listen to The Last Centurion again? Why?

Yes! I'm on my 5th replay. It's funny, thought-provoking and helped me get through my GCSE Pyschology by giving me examples of a concept being discussed but not being at all boring.
It's engaging, good listening whether on a car journey or while doing housework, and the narrator gives the work life really well, not a monotone the way some narrators do.
This was my second ever purchase on Audible, and while other audiobooks have come and gone, this is still on my iPod and still being listened too.

This is the audiobook that had me trying to convert everyone I met to audiobooks.

What other book might you compare The Last Centurion to, and why?

It's a little like John Scalzi's Redshirts, as I said in my review of that book, but superior in my opinion.

What does Dan John Miller bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Oh man. Attitude. Half the humor is in his emphasis, how he portrays the switch from sarcasm to deadpan.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

"We are the Last Centurions, and this Rome America shall not fall." Which is the in-story tagline for the "Centurions" TV show and the last line of the book.

Any additional comments?

I cannot emphasize how much I love this book. I've bought the paperback as a result of the audiobook to lend to people that won't try audiobooks. This book is post-apocalyptic survival (without zombies) at its best.

3 people found this helpful

One annoying flaw in an excellent piece of prose.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-06-13

What did you like most about Redshirts?

I liked the principle most, and the inner monologues. The fact that nobody knew why they were doing what they did.

What other book might you compare Redshirts to, and why?

The only book other than John Scalzi's other books that this reminds me of is John Ringo's Last Centurion. Both books have soldier protagonists, both are commentary on how f-ed up the world they are living in is, and the tone and humor are similar. So are the narrators' voices.

What about Wil Wheaton’s performance did you like?

I liked everything about the way he portrayed the characters, with the exception of Duvahl (not sure of spelling) Some narrators are able to portray female voices well, but Wheaton's female voice was indistinguishable, which is part of the flaw this book has.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I actually started crying somewhere near the end. It might have been when Dahl got skewered. Or it might have been during the epilogue when Finn lectures Nick. Actually Nick's epilogue is a pretty good part in itself.

Any additional comments?

The big flaw in this audiobook is a combination of writer and narrator. Scalzi overuses the word 'said' which _in print_ probably doesn't matter too much. He also named two of his main characters Dahl and Duvahl.
When you get lines like:
"Are you sure?" Dahl said.
"I'm sure." Duvahl said
Near the start and you can't tell which one is the female character because the narrator isn't that capable of female voices and the names are too similar to connect with the identifying information you were given...
After the first hour I'd gotten over the "said,said,said," thing, but that section near the beginning is really annoying.Still a good listen though.

13 people found this helpful