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daisyrock

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  • 65
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  • 132
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Full of facts, short on character

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-07-20

Really interesting look at one of the most famous miscarriages of justice of our time. The writer handles process and detail better than character, but a certain 'flatness' is saved by a fine narration.

A must-read for all Brits

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-20

This book astonished me and totally blew my mind. Of course, I already knew there's racism in Britain, and that we are a nation living with Miss Havisham levels of bitter nostalgia over our lost empire, but I'd never closely examined the relationship between those things before - the way that racism is built into our institutions (I'm especially looking at you, education), so that even those who like to think of ourselves as egalitarian liberals can't help but be governed by it. Of course, I speak as a white person, and I am sadly aware that Brits of other skin hues may not be as astonished as I was reading this book. Akala's ambitious but highly readable work covers topics as diverse as sports, the police, music, education, slavery and our relationship with the USA to name just a few. It asks all of us, as Brits, to wake up from our self-congratulatory collective slumber and ask why more of us know about the Alabama Church Bombings than we do about the New Cross Massacre.
Akala read this himself and, despite the density of the facts and figures coming at you with every breath, his easygoing, lively and conversational tone makes it a compelling listen.

Not recommended

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-20

I bought this as I'd really enjoyed The Long Drop by the same author, and because I like the narrator, having listened to her read the Karen Pirie novels by Val McDermid. Sadly, neither woman was on form here. The premise is interesting, although wildly far fetched, but the plot holes are massive and frequent. Not least, when we finally find out who sank the Dana, that person has no clear motive whatsoever. Also, footballers doing dirty deeds in hotels is (sadly) such a commonplace, it doesn't seem realistic that it could stir up so much trouble.
As for the narration, the reading is good. But Cathleen McCarron is out of her depth with non-Scottish accents. The character who creates the original podcast is supposed to have a South London accent, but instead has that all-purpose jolly hockey sticks accent that so often gets rolled out for English female characters. And don't get me started on the various European accents (many of which wander into Welsh from time to time). Overall, a big fat let down from a writer and reader who can both do better.

1 person found this helpful

Meyrick and Monteath on good form

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-06-20

Another adventure with Daley and Scott. All the usual cast of characters is here, and the hilarious dialogue between Bri and Ella is on point! I can't imagine this series without the brilliant narration and perfect timing of David Monteath. Spot on.

2 people found this helpful

Even better than The Hunting Party

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-20

I loved this stylised classic whodunnit in a modern setting. I found it richer and even more slippery than its predecessor. Bravo!

Fair to middling

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-11-19

On the plus side, I liked the main character, Detective Brindle, and I liked his stately-home-owning background. I also liked the many different suspects offered up for us to ponder. Also, it's narrated by 'David Archer'.

On the minus side, I did guess the baddie fairly early on. Also, 'David Archer' can't do women's voices. They all sound about 100 years old and/or simple minded.

Not a bad listen, but maybe not a writer or narrator I will try again.

So hard to follow!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-19

I got to the halfway point of this and started again. There are so many characters, many doctors, all referred to by their surname, introduced in rapid succession. Halfway through I realised I'd totally lost track of who was who. Even on a second go through I had to concentrate pretty hard! This would likely not be such a problem with a written version as it's much easier to flick back and forth. Anyway, I enjoyed it in the end and the narration is very good indeed.

2 people found this helpful

Stands the test of time

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-11-19

Engaging country house mystery with solid characters and lots of red herrings. Very well narrated too.

1 person found this helpful

Brilliant storytelling, stellar narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-09-19

I love Anthony Horowitz's very meta detective fiction. I loved Magpie Murders and The Word is Murder and this lived up to those very high standards. Steeped in a love of Sherlock Holmes (with dashes of Agatha Christie), this is a true delight for lovers of whodunnits. I can't wait for the next outing of Hawthorne and Horowitz.
A word on narrator Rory Kinnear - genius!

2 people found this helpful

Wonderful biography of an overlooked queen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-09-19

I loved this biography of Matilda. What a woman! So ahead of her time, she had no chance of success, but nonetheless became a foundation stone of the British monarchy. Poor Stephen comes across well too. The book was slightly marred by a narration that wasn't my cup of tea. Jennifer Dixon has a lovely voice, but one is always aware that she is reading - the best narrators have a flow to their delivery where it is easy to forget that they have a script in front of them.

2 people found this helpful