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Louisa

Freshwater Bay, United Kingdom
  • 77
  • reviews
  • 228
  • helpful votes
  • 125
  • ratings
  • Hot Milk

  • By: Deborah Levy
  • Narrated by: Romola Garai
  • Length: 8 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 198
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 184
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 185

Penguin presents the unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of Hot Milk by Deborah Levy, read by Romola Garai. Two strangers arrive in a small Spanish fishing village. The older woman is suffering from mysterious paralysis, driven to seek a cure beyond the bounds of conventional medicine. Her daughter, Sofia, has spent years playing the reluctant detective in this mystery, struggling to understand her mother's illness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dreamlike and fascinating

  • By A Person on 07-12-16

Worth sticking with

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-09-18

About half way thought this book I nearly gave up - I really couldn't see where it was going. However, having decided to listen for a long stretch, I realised it was a book that needed to be "read" almost in one go. The reader was excellent and pushed the narrative along and one gradually got the point of the story. I would definitely recommend listening to it if you have time to stick with it and then gradually you get a sense of the flow of the book. But I feel it's not a book to be listened to in small snippets.

  • The Punishment She Deserves

  • An Inspector Lynley Novel, Book 17
  • By: Elizabeth George
  • Narrated by: Julia Barrie
  • Length: 28 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79

When a Member of Parliament shows up at New Scotland Yard requesting an investigation into the suicide of the son of one of his constituents in the beautiful town of Ludlow, the Assistant Commissioner sees two opportunities in this request: the first is to have an MP owing him a favour, and the second is to get rid of Detective Sergeant Barbara Havers, whose career at the Met has been hanging by a thread for quite some time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A great read and listen

  • By J. VINER on 30-03-18

Masterly

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-09-18

This is probably the best of the series - very complex with lots of different threads - and as any reader will see - a brilliant title. The reader is outstanding - she manages the voices of the varied cast of characters - I'll say no more. For fans of Elizabeth George this is an absolute treat - for those who don't know her books - I'd say start at N° 1 and enjoy the whole saga from start to finish.

  • A Spy Among Friends: Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal

  • By: Ben Macintyre
  • Narrated by: Michael Tudor Barnes
  • Length: 12 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 582
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 548
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 545

Kim Philby was the most notorious British defector and Soviet mole in history. Agent, double agent, traitor and enigma, he betrayed every secret of Allied operations to the Russians in the early years of the Cold War. Philby's two closest friends in the intelligence world, Nicholas Elliott of MI6 and James Jesus Angleton, the CIA intelligence chief, thought they knew Philby better than anyone, and then discovered they had not known him at all.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Retold with Gripping Narrative

  • By Avril Sawers on 14-10-14

Fascinating and astonishing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-06-18

There isn't much to say about the story except that it is completely compelling and beautifully narrated and the scandal is well explained. One is shocked again by the depth of Philby's betrayal, but also about the complacency of his friends. But probably the most difficult thing to understand, and Macintyre clearly also has some difficulty understanding, was what prompted Philby to keep on spying after the war. We are dumbfounded at the way he betrayed everybody and everything with apparently no conscience or recognition of the damage he did. A really astonishing read.

  • The Black Friar

  • Damian Seeker 2
  • By: S. G. MacLean
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 11 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 93

London, 1655, and Cromwell's regime is under threat from all sides. Damian Seeker, Captain of Cromwell's Guard, is all too aware of the danger facing Cromwell. Parliament resents his control of the army while the army resents his absolute power. In the East End of London, a group of religious fanatics plots rebellion. In the midst of all this, a stonemason uncovers a perfectly preserved body dressed in the robes of a Dominican friar, bricked up in a wall in the crumbling Black Friars.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So good I was sorry when it ended

  • By Clare on 03-09-17

A brilliant sequel to Seeker

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-01-18

As some may know, the first volume of SG MacLean's new series was poorly read and for myself I returned the audio and read the print book. However, with a change to the excellent Jonathan Keeble we have a real treat. All MacLean's books are fascinating. She focuses very cleverly on the religious and moral dilemmas of the 17th century and this book is particularly interesting on the role of the 5th Monarchists during Cromwell's Protectorship and the problems that Cromwell faced controlling the country in the mid 1650s. My only criticism is that however hard she tries to make the Royalists seem like the bad guys, we know they end up the winners and so the author faces a conundrum - how to make the (finally) good guys look bad. Wisely most of our attention if focused on the truly bad! Her description of the attempts by Cromwell's government to control the media and information are interesting particularly in the context of modern attempts to control both of these slippery aspects of our own everyday lives.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Word Is Murder

  • By: Anthony Horowitz
  • Narrated by: Rory Kinnear
  • Length: 9 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,950
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,830
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,818

A wealthy woman strangled six hours after she's arranged her own funeral. A very private detective uncovering secrets but hiding his own. A reluctant author drawn into a story he can’t control. What do they have in common? Unexpected death, an unsolved mystery and a trail of bloody clues lie at the heart of Anthony Horowitz's new thriller. Spread the word. The word is murder.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Unemployed Detective

  • By Sarah on 30-08-17

A good joke

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-11-17

This is a sort of roman à clef with the key being the author himself - so if you know nothing about him and his books the whole thing might seem a bit odd. It's a sort of literary joke and quite a good story. All in all it's quite funny and a good idea - and one wonders if there will be a sequel and of course, a lot of the book is about writing sequels and how difficult that can be. So if you like books about London and about theatre and literature this is one for you.

  • Black Diamonds

  • The Rise and Fall of an English Dynasty
  • By: Catherine Bailey
  • Narrated by: Gareth Armstrong
  • Length: 15 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 644
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 445
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 444

Wentworth is today a crumbling and forgotten palace in Yorkshire. Yet just 100 years ago it was the ancestral pile of the Fitzwilliams' - an aristocratic clan whose home and life were fuelled by coal mining. This is the story of their spectacular decline: of inheritance fights; rumours of a changeling and of lunacy; philandering earls; illicit love; war heroism: a tragic connection to the Kennedys'; violent deaths: mining poverty and squalor; and a class war that literally ripped apart the local landscape.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant!

  • By Colin on 19-02-09

Interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-10-17

A very interesting account of the problems faced by independent mine owners in the early 20th century - the book is very well researched and gives a fascinating insight into the lives both of the miners and the owners. There is a vague mystery, but the book is chiefly a history book which is both lively and interesting.

  • The Distant Echo

  • By: Val McDermid
  • Narrated by: Tom Cotcher
  • Length: 14 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,827
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,685
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,681

On a freezing morning four drunken students stumble upon the body of a woman in the snow. Rosie has been raped, stabbed and left for dead in a cemetery. The only suspects are the four young men now stained with her blood. Twenty-five years later the police mount a cold-case review of Rosie’s unsolved murder, and the four are still suspects. But when two of them die in suspicious circumstances, it seems that someone is pursuing their own brand of justice....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absorbing story with good characters

  • By Janet on 07-03-17

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-06-17

Like other reviewers I have been wary of Val McDermid's books because they are rather gruesome - but this one is not and the story is gripping. I found the book an excellent and compulsive listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • In This Grave Hour

  • Maisie Dobbs Mysteries, Book 13
  • By: Jacqueline Winspear
  • Narrated by: Julie Teal
  • Length: 9 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 28

Britain is at war. Returned from a dangerous mission onto enemy soil, Maisie Dobbs is fully aware of the gravity of the current situation; her world is on the cusp of great change. One of those changes can be seen in the floods of refugees that are arriving in Britain, desperate for sanctuary. When Maisie stumbles on the deaths of refugees who may have been more than ordinary people, she is drawn into an investigation that requires all her insight and strength.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perhaps the best so far!

  • By Louisa on 16-06-17

Perhaps the best so far!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-06-17

Where does In This Grave Hour rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

I am a huge fan of Jacqueline Winspear so I have enjoyed them all, but this story is particularly good as it is well organised and gripping while including all the usual psychology and good advice.

What was one of the most memorable moments of In This Grave Hour?

You'll have to read it to find out, but there is a very interesting bit at the beginning! And an indication of more stories to come at the end!

Any additional comments?

I recommend all the books, but if you have not read any of them, you should start with the first book as it explains the background to the main characters and how Maisie got to be where she is now.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Girls

  • By: Emma Cline
  • Narrated by: Cady McClain
  • Length: 9 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 572
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 524
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 525

Evie Boyd is desperate to be noticed. In the summer of 1969, empty days stretch out under the California sun. The smell of honeysuckle thickens the air, and the sidewalks radiate heat. Until she sees them. The snatch of cold laughter. Hair long and uncombed. Dirty dresses skimming the tops of thighs. Cheap rings like a second set of knuckles. The girls. And at the centre, Russell. Russell and the ranch, down a long dirt track and deep in the hills. Incense and clumsily strummed chords. Rumours of sex, frenzied gatherings, teen runaways.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The human side...

  • By Mark on 05-01-17

Most unexpected

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-17

I would never have expected to have enjoyed this book - it's about very worrying things like drugs and violence. But the author quite brilliantly evokes late 1960s society in America and, in particular, the world of the cult, or near cult. We are encouraged to sympathise with the main character and the way that her life has been tarnished by a few months when she was very young. The author's portrayal of the way the group of young people descends into crime and and fear is also very evocative. An interesting and somewhat surprising read.

  • The Buried Giant

  • By: Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Narrated by: David Horovitch
  • Length: 11 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 757
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 690
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 691

The Romans have long since departed, and Britain is steadily declining into ruin. But at last the wars that once ravaged the country have ceased.The Buried Giant begins as a couple, Axl and Beatrice, set off across a troubled land of mist and rain in the hope of finding a son they have not seen for years. They expect to face many hazards - some strange and otherworldly - but they cannot yet foresee how their journey will reveal to them dark and forgotten corners of their love for one another.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Can heroes or love survive the truth?

  • By Wras on 05-03-15

Beautiful and evocative

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-17

As with many of Ishiguro's books, there is a strong strand of melancholy, but the book is very beautiful and thought provoking. Most wonderful of all is the way the author evokes the end of the Arthurian dream. He beautifully describes a society in decline - with the characters roaming among Roman and ancient British ruins - and ideas. The appearance of some Arthurian characters places the story in context, but like many of Ishiguro's stories, the genre is taken and wrenched apart to make a new and threatening environment. The fate of the characters is very Ishiguro-ish - but you understand that everybody achieves, or rather is awarded, what they deserve.