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  • reviews
  • 18
  • helpful votes
  • 35
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  • 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,288
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,880
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,867

Sapiens showed us where we came from. Homo Deus looked to the future. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century explores the present. How can we protect ourselves from nuclear war, ecological cataclysms and technological disruptions? What can we do about the epidemic of fake news or the threat of terrorism? What should we teach our children? Yuval Noah Harari takes us on a thrilling journey through today’s most urgent issues.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Grow your mind

  • By Paul Murphy on 07-09-18

It's no Sapiens

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-05-19

A lot more heavy on conjecture and opinion then I would have liked, but there are some interesting ideas. I feel like I've heard almost all of it before in better detail in other books.

  • James Acaster's Classic Scrapes

  • By: James Acaster
  • Narrated by: James Acaster
  • Length: 6 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,935
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,606
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,593

James Acaster has been nominated for the Edinburgh Comedy Award five times and has appeared on prime-time TV shows like Mock the Week, Live at the Apollo and Russell Howard's Stand Up Central. But behind the fame and critical acclaim is a man perpetually getting into trouble. Whether it's disappointing a skydiving instructor midflight or hiding from thugs in a bush wearing a bright red dress, James is always finding new ways to embarrass himself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliantly funny.

  • By Anonymous User on 05-09-17

Was funny enough

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-19

Pretty amusing at times, but I was hoping for based on how good the standup is, but I guess that's different skills

  • Reasons to Stay Alive

  • By: Matt Haig
  • Narrated by: Matt Haig
  • Length: 4 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,408
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,248
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,245

What Does it mean to feel truly alive? Aged 24, Matt Haig's world caved in. He could see no way to go on living. This is the true story of how he came through crisis, triumphed over an illness that almost destroyed him and learned to live again. A moving, funny and joyous exploration of how to live better, love better and feel more alive, Reasons to Stay Alive is more than a memoir. It is a book about making the most of your time on earth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A brave work for which I am so grateful

  • By Camilla Morgan on 26-05-15

Deep insight from an undeniably valid perspective

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-07-18

Writing about mental health is difficult. This book tries very hard and does a pretty good job. In the acknowledgements the author says he doesn't really know what the book is (memoir/information/self-help) and I picked up on that and was a bit confused to begin with, but once I got the hang of the style I found it easier to get on with.

I wanted to list to get some perspective on what people I've been close to and lost to suicide might have been going through and to some extent the book has been helpful. I've always sort of locked their deaths into an inevitability of the illness, something this the author is really against, so I think the most important thing I got from the listen was having that counterargument eloquently expressed, which helped me start to reconcile the two ideas.

Definitely an interesting one.

  • Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race

  • By: Reni Eddo-Lodge
  • Narrated by: Reni Eddo-Lodge
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,325
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,031
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,009

In February 2014, Reni Eddo-Lodge posted an impassioned argument on her blog about her deep-seated frustration with the way discussions of race and racism in Britain were constantly being shut down by those who weren't affected by it. She gave the post the title 'Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race'. Her sharp, fiercely intelligent words hit a nerve, and the post went viral, spawning a huge number of comments from people desperate to speak up about their own similar experiences.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Flagrant Racism Posing as Social Justice

  • By Joaquin on 11-09-18

Challenging but interesting nonetheless

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-18

Like any societal or political book I found myself agreeing with parts of this book (the concepts of privilege and structural racism are really well articulated for example) and disagreeing with others (I found the anti modern feminism and class stuff towards the end a bit was a bit broad strokes in it's criticism while simultaneously advocating the subtlety of it's own argument. Plus seeing as intersectionality was discussed so much I feel like that was then missing from the class chapter).

I guess the big difficulty though is that the book is pitching that as a white person if I disagreeing with some of this stuff it's probably because I'm a bit racist in the way that most to all white people reportedly are. That might be true to an extent and the book certainly helped me see how it might be, but it's hard to know to what extent. I try my best not to be and will redouble my efforts in the future in light of this without being colour blind.

So a tentative recommendation. If nothing else it certainly makes you think and question. Which I guess is mostly the point.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived

  • The Stories in Our Genes
  • By: Adam Rutherford
  • Narrated by: Adam Rutherford
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 426
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 388
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 385

This is a story about you. It is the history of who you are and how you came to be. It is unique to you, as it is for every one of the 100 billion modern humans who has ever drawn breath. But it is also our collective story, because in each of our genomes we carry the history of the whole of our species.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • In depth science that is enjoyable, and sometime mind blowing 👍

  • By Andrew W-B on 26-10-16

So much stuff to learn!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-04-18

Fantastic overview of genetics spanning all of human history. A great mix of in-depth science and illustrative metaphor to given narrative by the transition of history. Highly recommended.

  • Prospero Burns

  • The Horus Heresy, Book 15
  • By: Dan Abnett
  • Narrated by: Gareth Armstrong
  • Length: 12 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 348
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 319
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 318

The Emperor is enraged. Primarch Magnus the Red of the Thousand Sons Legion has made a terrible mistake that endangers the very safety of Terra. With no other choice, the Emperor charges Leman Russ, Primarch of the Space Wolves, with the apprehension of his brother from the Thousand Sons home world of Prospero.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A must for any warhammer 40k fans!

  • By Anonymous User on 08-01-19

Much less Prospero burning than one might expect

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-04-18

Foe those wanting to hear about the bit of Prospero, that happens elsewhere. This was okay, takes a while to get going and all the time hopping is a little confusing due to the reader not breaking at all between what I imagine in the text would be paragraph breaks and spaces

  • The Power

  • By: Naomi Alderman
  • Narrated by: Adjoa Andoh, Naomi Alderman, Thomas Judd, and others
  • Length: 12 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,389
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,139
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,137

'She throws her head back and pushes her chest forward and lets go a huge blast right into the centre of his body. The rivulets and streams of red scarring run across his chest and up around his throat. She'd put her hand on his heart and stopped him dead.' Suddenly - tomorrow or the day after - girls find that with a flick of their fingers, they can inflict agonizing pain and even death.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Visceral, Stirring and Inspirational

  • By Raine on 29-12-16

Yeh, great, all day

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-01-18

What I liked most about this book is the attention to detail, the ground work for the shifting power is laid out so careful over the first half, the more extreme events later not only seem logical but inevitable.
I also loved the introduction/post script between the female editor and man author which frame the whole book so perfectly.
Extremely recommend!

  • I Am Pilgrim

  • By: Terry Hayes
  • Narrated by: Christopher Ragland
  • Length: 22 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,752
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,543
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,537

Pilgrim is the code name for a man who doesn't exist. The adopted son of a wealthy American family, he once headed up a secret espionage unit for US intelligence. Before he disappeared into anonymous retirement, he wrote the definitive book on forensic criminal investigation. But that book will come back to haunt him. It will help NYPD detective Ben Bradley track him down.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Exciting but a bit too full of cliches

  • By Anna on 19-12-16

Not as clever as it thinks it is

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-11-17

I got to the end of this book which I suppose is something, if there is skill to be found I guess it's in making literally everything a cliff hanger.

My main issue was that the book keeps insisting the protagonist is the greatest and for some reason most sexually appealing agent ever but when it comes to it, what does he actually do? With the exception of some very questionably feasible work with mirrors the story is moved almost entirely by coincidences and the uncommonly rare occurrences (the unique five holed flute thing for instance).

This is certainly no Bond or Holmes, but more like whatever that guy from the Da Vinci code was called

  • Fatherland

  • By: Robert Harris
  • Narrated by: Michael Jayston
  • Length: 11 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,299
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,202
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,199

Fatherland is set in an alternative world where Hitler has won the Second World War. It is April 1964 and one week before Hitler's 75th birthday. Xavier March, a detective of the Kriminalpolizei, is called out to investigate the discovery of a dead body in a lake near Berlin's most prestigious suburb. As March discovers the identity of the body, he uncovers signs of a conspiracy that could go to the very top of the German Reich.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thought Provoking

  • By Amazon Customer on 16-02-18

Interesting and well performed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-10-17

Was a bit unsure of where the story was going to begin with but really came together at the end, well worth sticking with

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • It

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Steven Weber
  • Length: 44 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,097
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,726
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,718

To the children, the town was their whole world. To the adults, knowing better, Derry, Maine, was just their hometown: familiar, well ordered for the most part. A good place to live. It was the children who saw - and felt - what made Derry so horribly different. In the storm drains, in the sewers, IT lurked, taking on the shape of every nightmare, each one's deepest dread. Sometimes IT reached up, seizing, tearing, killing....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well worth a read

  • By T. Owen on 19-11-17

That was a bit of an ordeal

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-10-17

there are certainly good bits to this book and the performance is really good, but oh my days it drags on a bit! So much meandering that it was at times a real effort to go back to, took me over a month to get through it. I have listened to long books that have been much more gripping and did not feel such a drag. But then thats what you're getting into with a Stephen king...