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Thomas Kovar

  • 7
  • reviews
  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 42
  • ratings
  • A Legacy of Spies

  • By: John le Carré
  • Narrated by: Tom Hollander
  • Length: 8 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,132
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,032
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,022

Peter Guillam, staunch colleague and disciple of George Smiley of the British Secret Service, is living out his old age on the family farmstead in Brittany when a letter summons him to London. The reason? His Cold War past has come back to claim him. Intelligence operations that were once the toast of secret London and involved such characters as Alec Leamas, Jim Prideaux, George Smiley and Peter Guillam himself are to be scrutinised under disturbing criteria by a generation with no memory of the Cold War.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • New life into a favourite series

  • By nicole on 10-09-17

Superb

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-17

Hollander is fabulous, and the book is one of lecarre's best. Enjoyed it from start to finish and may listen again, which is unusual for me.

  • Lies

  • By: T. M. Logan
  • Narrated by: Leighton Pugh
  • Length: 10 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,419
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,280
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,281

Gripping and packed with twists and turns, this stunning thriller will make you question whether we can ever really trust the ones we love.... What if your whole life was based on lies? When Joe Lynch stumbles across his wife driving into a hotel car park while she's supposed to be at work, he's intrigued enough to follow her in. And when he witnesses her in an angry altercation with family friend Ben, he knows he ought to intervene.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Disturbing brilliant Debut

  • By Laura Prime on 31-05-17

Meh

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-08-17

Dreadful accents and and plot so contrived as to be almost unbearable. A relicensing on technology not insight to solve the problems the characters encounter.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Dissidence

  • The Corporation Wars, Book 1
  • By: Ken MacLeod
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 9 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 120
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 109
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 108

One of SFX magazine's Most Anticipated Books for 2016. An epic vision of man and machine in the far reaches of space. Carlos is dead. A soldier who died for his ideals a 1000 years ago, he's been reincarnated and conscripted to fight an A.I. revolution in deep space. And he's not sure he's fighting for the right side. Seba is alive. By a fluke of nature, a contractual overlap and a loop in its subroutines, this lunar mining robot has gained sentience.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Boring

  • By Mara on 12-09-17

good solid stuff. don't be put off by the title!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-07-17

what was he thinking? really good book. Bloody awful title. MacLeod is filling a Banks shaped hole for me.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Sudden Appearance of Hope

  • By: Claire North
  • Narrated by: Gillian Burke
  • Length: 16 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 369
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 354
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 354

My name is Hope Arden. I am the girl the world forgets. It started when I was 16 years old. A father forgetting to drive me to school. A mother setting the table for three, not four. A friend who looks at me and sees a stranger. No matter what I do, the words I say, the crimes I commit - you will never remember who I am. That makes my life tricky. It also makes me dangerous.... The Sudden Appearance of Hope is the tale of a girl no one remembers, yet her story will stay with you for ever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just wow

  • By Mr. S. Wallace-jones on 18-07-16

difficult second novel. poor reading performance

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-05-17

This is not as well constructed as the nine lives of Harry August, with a distinctly wandering plot. still entertaining but certainly not tight or focused in any way. This is exacerbated by a poor narrative performance which is OK in the majority, punctuated by awful accents, including an attempt at Scottish which meanders as far a Jamaica is its quest for authenticity. Most off-putting.



  • The End of the Day

  • By: Claire North
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 12 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 125
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 118
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 118

Charlie meets everyone - but only once. You might meet him in a hospital, in a war zone, or at the scene of traffic accident. Then again, you might meet him at the North Pole - Charlie gets everywhere. Sometimes he is sent as a courtesy, sometimes as a warning. Either way, this is going to be the most important meeting of your life. The End of the Day is the stunning new story from Richard and Judy Book Club author Claire North: the voice behind the word-of-mouth best-seller The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Such a disappointment

  • By Eugene Oconnell on 14-04-17

surprisingly good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-05-17

enjoyed the story, which managed to resonate beyond it's narrative. Peter Kenny is, as always, excellent.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Stone Man

  • A Science Fiction Horror Novel
  • By: Luke Smitherd
  • Narrated by: Matt Addis
  • Length: 14 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,938
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,826
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,818

Nobody knew where it came from. Nobody knew why it came. When an eight-foot-tall man made of stone appears in the middle of a busy city center one July afternoon, two-bit (and antisocial) reporter Andy Pointer assumes it's just a publicity stunt. Indeed, so does everyone else...until the Stone Man begins to walk, heading silently through the wall of the nearest building, flattening it, and killing several people inside as a result.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Original British SF...absolutely loved it!!

  • By Jude on 12-07-15

Acceptable

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-03-17

The performance reflects the tone of the book and the voice of the central chapters well enough. Unfortunately this voice is both annoying and ultimately unlikeable. The plot is mostly well paced but contains little or no depth in exploring its themes beyond the event of the novel.

Without giving spoilers ; the last section of the book contains a bizarre and unsatisfying narrative shift.

However I listened to the last, so it has the quality of a page turner.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Blackout

  • By: Connie Willis
  • Narrated by: Katherine Kellgren, Connie Willis
  • Length: 18 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 124
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 62

In her first novel since 2002, Nebula and Hugo award-winning author Connie Willis returns with a stunning, enormously entertaining novel of time travel, war, and the deeds - great and small - of ordinary people who shape history. In the hands of this acclaimed storyteller, the past and future collideand the result is at once intriguing, elusive, and frightening.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • First of a great pair of books

  • By PrintersPie on 25-02-11

One to miss

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-01-11

This book, documenting british experience during the second world war, could only have been written by an American. Pejorative, condescending, romanticised and quaint. The sections set in 2060 are almost unlistenable as descriptions of modern people. The narration captures the dire nature of the book completely and compliments it with it's own air of patronising tweeness.

Not for fans of history, literature or dignity.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful