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Simon Evers

UK
  • 37
  • reviews
  • 66
  • helpful votes
  • 74
  • ratings
  • Forever and a Day

  • By: Anthony Horowitz
  • Narrated by: Matthew Goode
  • Length: 7 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 475
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 445
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 445

M laid down his pipe and stared at it tetchily. 'We have no choice. We're just going to bring forward this other chap you've been preparing. But you didn't tell me his name.' 'It's Bond, sir,' the Chief of Staff replied. 'James Bond.' One body. Three bullets. 007 floats in the waters of Marseille, killed by an unknown hand. It's time for a new agent to step up. Time for a new weapon in the war against organised crime. It's time for James Bond to earn his licence to kill.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Iconic Legend is Born

  • By Simon on 02-06-18

A good pastiche

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-06-18

If I'm a little dissatisified, it's because there are one or two details that simply don't ring true. For instance, (spoiler alert) after Bond is severely beaten and has his ribs broken, he finds no problem in swimming for his life in the sea - superhuman! Sixteen seems to me a silly name for the heroine, too.
Also for me the narrator's voice is a bit too 'flat' - almost laconic.
However, Horowitz certainly captures Fleming's way of writing and the details are authentic and timely. The story is typically Bond and there are some nice touches - particularly the revelation of the origin of 'shaken not stirred'!
A fun read, if not out of the top drawer.

  • The Heart's Invisible Furies

  • By: John Boyne
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hogan
  • Length: 21 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,132
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,003
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2,002

Cyril Avery is not a real Avery, or at least that's what his adoptive parents tell him. And he never will be. But if he isn't a real Avery, then who is he? Born out of wedlock to a teenage girl cast out from her rural Irish community and adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple via the intervention of a hunchbacked Redemptorist nun, Cyril is adrift in the world, anchored only tenuously by his heartfelt friendship with the infinitely more glamourous and dangerous Julian Woodbead.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Phenomenal

  • By Kerri on 19-02-17

Engrossing saga

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-06-18

This saga completely draws the listener in. Beautifully written, superbly narrated: what more could one ask for?

  • Silent Child

  • Audible's Thriller of 2017
  • By: Sarah A. Denzil
  • Narrated by: Joanne Froggatt
  • Length: 9 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,584
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,204
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,211

Introducing Audible's Thriller of the Year: Silent Child by Sarah A. Denzil, performed by Joanne Froggatt. In the summer of 2006, Emma Price watched helplessly as her six-year-old son's red coat was fished out of the River Ouse. It was the tragic story of the year - a little boy, Aiden, wandered away from school during a terrible flood, fell into the river, and drowned. His body was never recovered. Ten years later Emma has finally rediscovered the joy in life...until Aiden returns.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing

  • By madison on 06-09-17

Over-hyped

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-09-17

I was expecting far better from the so-called title of the year.
I found the whole story drawn out far too much. The protagonist became just rather annoying and the story line completely beyond any.belief.
I admire Joanne Froggatt as an actress but for me she went over the top with her histronic rendition of the dialogue too often.
What a disappointment.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Prayer for Owen Meany

  • By: John Irving
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 27 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 862
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 661
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 659

Of all of John Irving's books, this is the one that lends itself best to audio. In print, Owen Meany's dialogue is set in capital letters; for this production, Irving himself selected Joe Barrett to deliver Meany's difficult voice as intended. In the summer of 1953, two 11-year-old boys – best friends – are playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire. One of the boys hits a foul ball that kills the other boy's mother. The boy who hits the ball doesn't believe in accidents; Owen Meany believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is extraordinary and terrifying.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An amazing and memorable book

  • By Kirstine on 17-05-14

Lovely story; superb naration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-17

I thorouglhy enjoyed this book - and I really only wanted to say that the superb narration (not least Owen's voice!) made it so.

  • The Road Home

  • By: Rose Tremain
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 7 hrs and 55 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31

Winner of the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction 2008, The Road Home is the best-selling story of Lev, a middle-aged migrant from Eastern Europe, who moves to London in search of work after losing his wife and job. Lev's London is awash with money, celebrity and complacency. The world Tremain creates is both convincing and poignant.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A terrific experience

  • By Jane on 03-05-09

The best audiobook ever?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-04-17

I have listened to many audiobooks and I honestly think it would be almost impossible to better this one. There are two reasons I say this:

Frstly, I have only recently come across Rose Tremain and her books. She makes her characters very real and completely easy to empathise with (which is so important). She is also a comsummate story teller. This book shows both these things in spades.

Secondly, the perormance of this audiobook is quite exceptionally good. Juliet Stevenson is a truly gifted actor and her skill in portraying the different people in the story is quite outstanding. Also, I don't usually like musical interludes in an audiobook but those here somehow add to the narrative rather than detract from it.

The total package is therefore completely satisfying - I was so wrapped up in the book that (almost) everything else was ignored!

Brilliant.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Bloodline

  • Tom Thorne, Book 8
  • By: Mark Billingham
  • Narrated by: Mark Billingham
  • Length: 9 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 118

When a dead body is found in a North London flat, it seems like a straightforward domestic murder until a bloodstained sliver of X-ray is found clutched in the dead woman's fist - and it quickly becomes clear that this case is anything but ordinary. DI Thorne discovers that the victim's mother had herself been murdered 15 years before by infamous serial killer Raymond Garvey. The hunt to catch Garvey was one of the biggest in the history of the Met and ended with seven women dead.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tom Thorne at his best

  • By Patricia on 23-02-17

Not the best in the series

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-02-17

Sadly - but inevitably, i suppose - Mark Billingham has never quite managed to capture the excellence of the first two or three in the Tom Thorne series. This isn't bad and has some good moments.

However, I have to say that I think he is wrong to narrate his books himself - he's a good writer but I find his narration flat and for me it detracts from a proper enjoyment of the book. I honestly think I would have enjoyed this book more if it had been narrated by someone more skilled.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Muse

  • By: Jessie Burton
  • Narrated by: Cathy Tyson
  • Length: 12 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,271
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,165
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,159

On a hot July day in 1967, Odelle Bastien climbs the stone steps of the Skelton gallery in London, knowing that her life is about to change forever. Having struggled to find her place in the city since she arrived from Trinidad five years ago, she has been offered a job as a typist under the tutelage of the glamorous and enigmatic Marjorie Quick. Although Quick takes Odelle into her confidence and unlocks a potential she didn't know she had, she remains a mystery - no more so than when a lost masterpiece with a secret history is delivered to the gallery.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Left me emotionally confused... But I loved it!

  • By Sarah-rose on 26-08-16

Engrossing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-16

This is an engrossing story, full of atmosphere, switching between Spain in the 1930's and London in the 1960's, both of which are evocatively described. There is an intriguing connection between the two - and an interesting twist at the end. The characters are well drawn and well brought to life.

The reading is universally excellent although the various accents employed occasionally slip into caricature.

Overall, I much enjoyed this - even more, I think, than the excellent 'The Minituarist'.

  • The Light Between Oceans

  • By: M L Stedman
  • Narrated by: Noah Taylor
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 724
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 663
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 657

The crying persisted. The door of the lighthouse clanged in the distance, and Tom's tall frame appeared on the gallery as he scanned the island with the binoculars. 'Izzy!' he yelled, 'a boat!' He vanished and re-emerged at ground level. 'It's a boat all right,' Tom declared. 'And – oh cripes! There's a bloke, but –' The figure was motionless, yet the cries still rang out. He hoisted out a woollen bundle: a woman's soft lavender cardigan wrapped around a tiny, screaming infant.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Love

  • By sue on 05-08-14

Sad but beautiful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-09-16

The characters are totally believable and the setting very well described. The internal torment of the two main characters is very well caught.

The reader is excellent.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • You Are Dead

  • Roy Grace, Book 11
  • By: Peter James
  • Narrated by: Daniel Weyman
  • Length: 12 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,225
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,129
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,123

You are Dead is the 11th thrilling crime novel in Peter James' Roy Grace series, narrated by Daniel Weyman. They were marked for death. The last words Jamie Ball hears from his fiancée, Logan Somerville, are in a terrified mobile phone call. She has just driven into the underground car park beneath the block of flats where they live in Brighton. Then she screams and the phone goes dead.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another fantastic read!

  • By Liane on 31-05-15

So implausible to be almost laughable.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-07-15

Oh dear. I like the characters in the series very much and the first three-quarters of the book jogged along nicely as we discovered a bit more about some of them as an intriguing story developed. There is a touching and well-written (and narrated) description of a police funeral - but then -

Once the villain is revealed, the whole plot - and the description of the villain himself and what he says and does - collapses into the completely ludicrous. The scenes set in the villain's house lurch from the ridiculous to something beyond absurd. I can't understand what overcame the author. It all ruins the book - for me, at least.

And other things jar - why can't the ridiculous Sandy saga be finished off, for instance? And as for the cliiff-hanger ending - I groaned at the thought that the Brighton Brander is going to get another outing.

But there we go - no doubt I shall buy the next one in the series - if only to see if Mr James can get back to the real world and write as well and as enjoyably as we know he can from past books in the series,

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Time of Death

  • By: Mark Billingham
  • Narrated by: Mark Billingham
  • Length: 10 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 436
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 395
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 396

Discover one of the two masterful hit novels adapted for the massive new BBC One Drama series In The Dark, featuring brilliant heroine Helen Weeks. Two schoolgirls are abducted in the small, dying Warwickshire town of Polesford, driving a knife into the heart of the community where police officer Helen Weeks grew up. But this is a place full of secrets, where dangerous truths lie buried. When family man Stephen Bates has been arrested, Helen and her partner Tom Thorne head to the flooded town....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Thorne Tour De Force

  • By Ms. L. Chalkley on 27-04-15

Not the best in the series

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-15

Strikes me this one is a bit of a pot-boiler. A slow story and really rather dull, partly because Thorne is off-duty and so the usual procedural details are missing.

And I'm sorry, Mr B, but I don't find your narration of the best! Your voice is a bit flat and your interpretation of Thorne jars with me.

(I shall read / listen to the next one in the hope that it gets back to the standard we are used to.)