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Nanbar3

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  • Vietnam

  • An Epic History of a Divisive War 1945-1975
  • By: Max Hastings
  • Narrated by: Peter Noble, Max Hastings - introduction
  • Length: 33 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 234
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 217
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 215

Vietnam became the Western world’s most divisive modern conflict, precipitating a battlefield humiliation for France in 1954, then a vastly greater one for the United States in 1975. Max Hastings has spent the past three years interviewing scores of participants on both sides, as well as researching a multitude of American and Vietnamese documents and memoirs, to create an epic narrative of an epic struggle. He portrays the set pieces of Dienbienphu, the Tet offensive, the air blitz of North Vietnam and less familiar battles such as the bloodbath at Daido.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Derrick on 20-10-18

Vietnam

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-18

I thoroughly enjoyed the book. We heard personal accounts from all sides, political and historical context for the war . The narrator was excellent. A complex war and geopolitical situation was laid out throughout the narrative in a thought provoking and interesting way.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Wounded

  • By: Emily Mayhew
  • Narrated by: Nigel Anthony
  • Length: 8 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 24

Wounded traces the journey made by a casualty from the battlefield to a hospital in Britain. It is a story told through the testimony of those who cared for him - stretcher bearers and medical officers, surgeons and chaplains, orderlies and nurses - from the aid post in the trenches to the casualty clearing station and the ambulance train back to Blighty. We feel the calloused hands of the stretcher-bearers; we see the bloody dressings and bandages; we smell the nauseating gangrene and, at London’s stations, the gas clinging to the uniforms of the men arriving home.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • atmospheric listen

  • By sarah c turner on 12-04-17

A history of the war that should be more well known

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-02-17

I enjoyed all of the book. The description of injuries are difficult to listen to but it puts into context exactly what everyone was going thorough. The individual stories shone a light on the lives o caring. En and women from all walks of life. Stretcher bearers, padres, nurses, doctors, surgeons, soldiers.

Personally I was willing various characters to get through the war unscathed , who had been so selfless in terms of what they gave to others. Also that even in the midst of all that horror individuals maintained their humanity.
You can understand where medicine learned new skills in reconstructive surgery which found its way in to the day to day medical treatments in hospitals today. Wars move medicine on particularly trauma medicine as we now know following conflicts in Iraq, and Afghanistan.
Would recommend to others.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Holocaust

  • A New History
  • By: Laurence Rees
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 19 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 363
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 333
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 331

Laurence Rees, in his magnum opus, combines largely unpublished testimony with the latest academic research to create the first accessible and authoritative account of the Holocaust in over three decades. Rees argues that whilst hatred of the Jews was always at the epicentre of Nazi thinking - and the Holocaust was the most appalling crime in history - what happened cannot be fully understood without considering the murder of the Jews alongside other Nazi plans to kill millions of non-Jews as well.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Holocaust - A masterly telling

  • By Rathelstan on 28-02-17

History Repeats Itself ?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-17

As I enjoy history books, there isn't anything in particular I dislike about the book. It is a timely reminder of how human beings can allow themselves to believe demagoguery when they benefit from it at someone else's expense ( Jews, Poles, everyone not considered racially superior). It is an extremely well researched book, with accounts from individuals who were there. Even though everyone knows about the extermination of European Jewry, the level of Nazi anti Jewish sentiment made me feel physically sick. The level of collusion
To formulate extermination very frightening indeed. In current times we need to remember for evil to succeed all it takes is people doing nothing.


15 of 17 people found this review helpful