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Katarina Jonssson

  • 9
  • reviews
  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 14
  • ratings
  • The Rottweiler

  • By: Ruth Rendell
  • Narrated by: Nigel Anthony
  • Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 86
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 77

The first girl had a bite mark on her neck, but they traced the DNA to her boyfriend. But the tabloids got hold of the story and called the killer 'The Rottweiler' and the name stuck. The latest murder takes place very near Inez Ferry's antique shop in Marylebone. When the Rottweiler’s trinkets start showing up in the shop, suddenly, everyone Inez knows is a suspect, and the killer feels all too close.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Rottweiler

  • By Susan Random on 28-02-16

A classic Rendell

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-01-19

The Rottweiler is a fairly typical Ruth Rendell story. Psychologically astute it paints a spectrum of more or less dysfunctional human beings in shades that make them utterly believable and when it comes to the killer chillingly real. It is as much a depiction of the vast variety of scheming and manipulating that goes on inside human relationships as it is a murder mystery and overall it is definitely more enjoyable for its colourful cast of characters than for the relatively mundane murder mystery. A very enjoyable read, though not one of her best.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Call of the Cthulhu and Other Stories

  • By: H. P. Lovecraft
  • Narrated by: Gareth David-Lloyd, Ian Fairbairn
  • Length: 1 hr and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 11

The Call of Cthulhu", written in 1926, is probably Lovecraft's best-known work. Discovering notes left by a deceased relative, the narrator pieces together the whole truth and disturbing significance of the Cthulhu cult. This release also contains the shorter tales "The Festival" and "The Hound", in which gravediggers bring home more than they bargained for!

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Surprisingly sophisticated

  • By Katarina Jonssson on 21-01-19

Surprisingly sophisticated

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-01-19

Having tried to read these stories as a teenager and finding them unintelligible I have been reticent to take them on again. After coming into contact with them at work and seeing that they were available read by a favourite actor I was tempted to give them another go. It was well worth it. Having them read out to me broke through the density of the language and made me realise that the stories were intriguingly intertextual and sophisticated. This is not just a collection of bizzare stories of the supernatural but also stories about humanity and the things that frighten us in ourselves and the world around us.

  • Little Dorrit

  • By: Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: Sinead Dixon
  • Length: 36 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9

When Arthur Clennam returns to England after many years abroad, he takes a kindly interest in Amy Dorrit, his mother's seamstress, and in the affairs of Amy's father, William Dorrit, a man of shabby grandeur, long imprisoned for debt in Marshalsea prison. As Arthur soon discovers, the dark shadow of the prison stretches far beyond its walls to affect the lives of many, from the kindly Mr Panks, the reluctant rent-collector of Bleeding Heart Yard, and the tipsily garrulous Flora Finching, to Merdle, an unscrupulous financier, and the bureaucratic Barnacles in the Circumlocution Office.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A slow moving classic

  • By Katarina Jonssson on 21-01-19

A slow moving classic

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-01-19

Like all of Dickens' stories 'Little Dorrit' is a scathing social critique. It does a good job of presenting a highly ironic depiction of Victorian society. The serialization format it was first published in lets the pace of the story down, making it very slow at times. Still the story is despite its cliches and slow pace it is an enjoyable story with vivid characters. I don't think I will listen to it again but I enjoyed listening through.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Buried Giant

  • By: Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Narrated by: David Horovitch
  • Length: 11 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 788
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 720
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 721

The Romans have long since departed, and Britain is steadily declining into ruin. But at last the wars that once ravaged the country have ceased.The Buried Giant begins as a couple, Axl and Beatrice, set off across a troubled land of mist and rain in the hope of finding a son they have not seen for years. They expect to face many hazards - some strange and otherworldly - but they cannot yet foresee how their journey will reveal to them dark and forgotten corners of their love for one another.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Hmmmm

  • By Jenny on 12-03-15

Beautiful but not his best

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-12-18

This is a thrilling story of an old couple who set out to find their departed son but who end up finding their place in history instead, only to realise that knowledge is sometimes as much a curse as it is a blessing.

This is a wonderful exploration of the function of memory, individual and collective, of human relationships and the way that we write both individual and collective history. It is the kind of Novel that makes us see why he was put on the list for a Nobel Prize. Yet as much as it is clever it is not spellbinding.

The Arthurian connection felt a bit shallow and under-explored, and the fact that the characters can barely remember what they had for breakfast, never mind what happened to them a few chapters ago is frustrating and not always in a good way.
The themes of the novel are poignant and interesting... We are confronted with universal questions that affect us all, no matter our historical background... but this lack of specificity sometimes makes it feel too mythological... too lacking in substance.

This is Arthur... turned... not into myth or legend... but into an adult fairytale... It's a beautiful story, elegantly woven but just like fairy tales, it is flightly and hard to get a grasp of. It is beautiful as a fairy slipping through your fingers or a ghost sensed behind your back but it lacks the substance that would make it hit beyond the realm of academia in the years to come.

  • The Storyteller

  • By: Jodi Picoult
  • Narrated by: Mozhan Marno, Jennifer Ikeda, Edoardo Ballerini, and others
  • Length: 18 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 676
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 604
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 608

Jodi Picoult's poignant number one New York Times best-selling novels about family and love tackle hot-button issues head on. In The Storyteller, Sage Singer befriends Josef Weber, a beloved Little League coach and retired teacher. But then Josef asks Sage for a favor she never could have imagined - to kill him. After Josef reveals the heinous act he committed, Sage feels he may deserve that fate. But would his death be murder or justice?

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Ambitiously promises a lot which it can’t quite de

  • By Victoria on 19-07-13

Not a bad story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-12-18

Like most of what I have read of Picoult's writing, this is really not a bad story. She is clever enough to never be entirely predictable even if she never becomes truly groundbreaking. This isn't Nobel Prize-winning (though that price seems to have fallen in esteem lately), or even Booker Prize-winning material but it is enjoyable reading and certainly adept enough to keep you guessing until the end. The Characters are vivid and though the modern love story felt cliche the overall plot was inventive.

Even though I personally did not really like the accent of the narrator she read well and the story had just the right level of suspense combined with predictability to be really well suited to being listened to rather than analyzed.

It is a very good distraction. It will never be 'War and Peace' or 'Hamlet' but it's definitely enjoyable.

  • Sharp Objects

  • By: Gillian Flynn
  • Narrated by: Liza Ross
  • Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 939
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 830
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 831

When two girls are abducted and killed in Missouri, journalist Camille Preaker is sent back to her home town to report on the crimes. Long haunted by a childhood tragedy and estranged from her mother for years, Camille suddenly finds herself installed once again in her family's mansion, reacquainting herself with her distant mother and the half sister she barely knows - a precocious 13-year-old who holds a disquieting grip on the town.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Sinister and exciting

  • By Kim on 23-03-13

A good mystery but not a great novel

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-09-18

The characters in the story are certainly vivid but the plot twists feel a little bit stereotypical... The complete solution to the mystery is not entirely self evident but despite this the plot twists are sadly stereotypical. It is an intense and dramatic story but in its desire to hold our attention it ends up utilising so man dramatic conventions that it ends up feeling like a modern adult fairytale rather than a poignant commentary on small time life.
It's a decently enjoyable mystery but I doubt anyone will remember it for its literary quality in fifty years time.

  • Nutshell

  • By: Ian McEwan
  • Narrated by: Rory Kinnear
  • Length: 5 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 748
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 679
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 675

Nutshell is a classic story of murder and deceit, told by a narrator with a perspective and voice unlike any in recent literature. A bravura performance, it is the finest recent work from a true master. To be bound in a nutshell, see the world in two inches of ivory, in a grain of sand. Why not, when all of literature, all of art, of human endeavour, is just a speck in the universe of possible things?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hamlet From The Womb

  • By Simon on 01-09-16

An educated featus...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-09-18

I don't think I have ever read a bad Ian McEwan novel... that being said this is not one of his best. The story is great... the language is enchanting and I thoroughly enjoyed it throughout. However the concept is a bit silly. The intelligent, educated and fully functioning featus has an opinion, not just on parental morality, but on vintages and poetry. While the story is compelling and well written the premise of the academic mind of the author transposed on to the unborn child of the story is dubious at best. It works because it is so well written but even at it's most eloquent I never felt comfortable with th protagonist.

  • The Sense of an Ending

  • By: Julian Barnes
  • Narrated by: Richard Morant
  • Length: 4 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 872
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 608
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 604

Tony Webster and his clique first met Adrian Finn at school. Sex-hungry and book-hungry, they would navigate the girl-less sixth form together, trading in affectations, in-jokes, rumour, and wit. Maybe Adrian was more serious than the others, certainly more intelligent, but they all swore to stay friends for life. Now Tony is retired.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Sense of an Ending

  • By Carol on 01-09-11

A modest challenge of your point of view.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-09-18

Vivid characters and a plot that keeps you guessing even though it is hardly a mystery novel sets this up to be a spectacular read. Occationally the Booker Prize is handed out for not entirely thought through reasons but not in this case. This novel has the suspence and mystery of an Ian McEwan novel and an emotional depth that ranges from the function of memory to the nature of love... A fantastic read for the modern reader looking for a modest challenge of their point of view.

  • American Gods: The Tenth Anniversary Edition (A Full Cast Production)

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Ron McLarty, Daniel Oreskes, full cast
  • Length: 19 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 57
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 57

Locked behind bars for three years, Shadow did his time, quietly waiting for the day when he could return to Eagle Point, Indiana. A man no longer scared of what tomorrow might bring, all he wanted was to be with Laura, the wife he deeply loved, and start a new life. But just days before his release, Laura and Shadow's best friend are killed in an accident. With his life in pieces and nothing to keep him tethered, Shadow accepts a job from a beguiling stranger he meets on the way home, an enigmatic man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Lots, and lots, and lots of gods...

  • By Katarina Jonssson on 17-08-18

Lots, and lots, and lots of gods...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-08-18

It's wonderfully performed and a really creative story but to be honest at some point along the way the various gods that flitted past for a scene or two started to blend into one another. The wonderful performance made listening enjoyable but the complexity of the story might have lent itself better to reading a physical book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful