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Tout en chantant

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 11
  • ratings
  • Contemplative Prayer

  • Meditation in the Christian Tradition
  • By: James Finley
  • Narrated by: James Finley
  • Length: 25 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3

Since the time of the Desert Fathers in the third century, Christian mystics have practiced meditation as a way of opening to the presence of God in daily life. James Finley, a friend of Thomas Merton and his fellow monk for six years at the Abbey of Gethsemani, introduces us to this direct, mystical form of prayer, an enduring path of communion with the divine that reflects the spirit of Christ's own desert sojourns.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Good meditation BUT

  • By Tout en chantant on 13-08-18

Good meditation BUT

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-08-18

It is a very good meditation but no sooner it has finished that you are given A BIG FRIGHT when the Audible voice shouts AUDIBLE HOPES YOU HAVE ENJOYED THIS PROGRAM! I thought I was going to have a heart attack!

  • Tibetan Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction

  • By: Matthew T. Kapstein
  • Narrated by: Neil Shah
  • Length: 4 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

The Tibetan Buddhist tradition has known over 13 centuries of continuous development. During that time, it has spread among the neighboring peoples - the Mongol, Himalayan, and Siberian peoples, Manchus, and Chinese. At its height is has been practiced in regions as far west as the Volga river and to the east in Beijing. Its capacity for creative adaptation is demonstrated by its recent growth in Europe and America. At the same time, it is at the center of political contestation in ethnically Tibetan regions of China, while its best known exponent, the Dalai Lama, has become one of the most admired religious leaders in the world today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good book, beautifully read.

  • By Jon on 09-01-15

Dreadfully boring

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-01-18

What was most disappointing about Matthew T. Kapstein’s story?

A barrage of dates and strange names with almost no substance in between to flesh them out, how is that supposed to be an introduction to anything??!!

  • Masters of Greek Thought: Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle

  • By: Robert C. Bartlett, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Robert C. Bartlett
  • Length: 18 hrs and 16 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 27

For more than two millennia, philosophers have grappled with life's most profound and "eternal" questions. It is easy to forget, however, that these questions about fundamental issues like justice, injustice, virtue, vice, or happiness were not always eternal. They once had to be asked for the first time.This was a step that could place the inquirer beyond the boundaries of the law. And the Athenian citizen and philosopher who took that courageous step in the 5th century B.C. was Socrates.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • I wanted to hear their philosophy

  • By Steve on 22-09-16

Bland, boring, superficial, poorly presented

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-12-16

What would have made Masters of Greek Thought: Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle better?

In a course entitled Masters of Greek Thought: Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle the field to cover is of course bast and some judicious choices have to be made if you want to bring some depth to treatment and avoid bland superficality, this Professor C Bartlett unfortunately fails to do: his approach is anodyne, dull, repetitive and often very poorly reasoned. I got the impression that he did not spend much time preparing for this course.

What will your next listen be?

I am going straight to the source this time: Plato's Republic

What didn’t you like about Professor Robert C. Bartlett’s performance?

He lacked vigor and mental finesse. His sentences are boring and his treatment of the subject meandering and often inconsistent.

  • The Singing Cure

  • By: Paul Newham
  • Narrated by: Paul Newham
  • Length: 9 hrs and 44 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars 1

When Sigmund Freud developed his revolutionary model for psychological treatment, he called it "the talking cure". Freud embraced the ancient Greek concept of catharsis while ignoring how it was originally practiced: through the expression of extreme vocal sounds, which resembled songs more than words. In The Singing Cure, vocal researcher Paul Newham presents the only professional training course in therapeutic singing.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • What an annoying voice!

  • By Tout en chantant on 15-04-16

What an annoying voice!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-04-16

It is ironic that Payl Newham's voice should sound so contrived, smarmy and plain annoying. As for the content, it is 'me, my voice, my songs, me singing, and singing and singing again, and me reading my stories, and reading them again but a bit louder now and ... ' You get the drift.

  • The Modern Scholar: From Jesus to Christianity: A History of the Early Church

  • By: Thomas F. Madden
  • Narrated by: Thomas F. Madden
  • Length: 8 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

In the first century of its existence, Christianity was both welcomed and vilified throughout the Roman Empire. Many of Christianity's original adherents were martyred. Christians themselves practiced their religion with great diversity, linked as much to local influences as theology. Political intrigue, theological beliefs, and simple misunderstandings created a need for dialogue between the many practitioners of the growing faith.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Just what I hoped it would be!

  • By Amazon Customer on 20-06-15

Rather dull

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-12

I have to disagree with the other review as I find TF Madden speach and ways most off-putting: his tone of voice was monotonous and lifeless as if he was really very tired and bored with the things he was saying, he speaks very slowly and with lost of 'ummmm' and 'ahhh' which meant that it took him for ever to finish a line of thought or story. As a result my attention wondered away constantly and it was a real effort not to get distracted. All in all a very dull experience.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful