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  • The Little Village School

  • By: Gervase Phinn
  • Narrated by: Gervase Phinn
  • Length: 11 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128

She was wearing red shoes! With silver heels! Elisabeth Devine causes quite a stir on her arrival in the village. No one can understand why the head of a big inner city school would want to come to sleepy little Barton-in-the-Dale, to a primary with more problems than school dinners. And that's not even counting the challenges the mysterious Elisabeth herself will face: a bitter former head teacher, a grumpy caretaker and a duplicitous chair of governors, to name but a few. Then there's the gossip.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Gentle and enjoyable, but not riveting

  • By Ann Watson on 01-12-13

A right grand story.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-18

Gradly The story captures village life in Yorkshire. Mr Phinn is a treat to listen to.

  • Notwithstanding

  • By: Louis De Bernieres
  • Narrated by: Mike Grady
  • Length: 8 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44

From the author of Captain Corelli's Mandolin; a heart-warming collection of stories inspired by life in an English village. Casting his mind back to the village where he grew up, Louis de Bernières brings us a forgotten England: where a lady might dress in plus fours, a retired general might give up wearing clothes and a spiritualist might live with her sister and the ghost of her husband. Here we find the atmosphere of those times as it was in the countryside, and the people whose lives are worth celebrating.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • If you like Correlli...

  • By Peeler on 23-12-12

Notwithstanding

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-17

This is a funny and thought provoking story which I have read in print twice before. Sadly the voice doesn't do it justice, too pofaced. However it was a description of the life in a small I can identify with.

  • The Wood for the Trees

  • The Long View of Nature from a Small Wood
  • By: Richard Fortey
  • Narrated by: Mike Grady
  • Length: 11 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 59
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 55
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54

Drawing upon a lifetime of scientific expertise and an abiding love of nature, Richard Fortey uses his small wood to tell a wider story of the ever-changing British landscape, human influence on the countryside over many centuries and the vital interactions between flora, fauna and fungi. The trees provide a majestic stage for woodland animals and plants to reveal their own stories.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Nike on 25-06-16

The wood for the trees

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-10-16

Richard Fortey bought a wood and he gives a concise and highly interesting review of the Natural History and social history of the region lying in the Chilterns. It moves seamlessly through the seasons. He was obviously fortunate in drawing on the expertise of the NHM in London where he worked for many years. I thought that the narration was rather stilted and forced. Dr Fortey would have been better reading it himself. I think his sense of humour was missed.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Dust That Falls from Dreams

  • By: Louis de Bernières
  • Narrated by: Avita Jay, David Sibley
  • Length: 17 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 158
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 147
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 146

In the brief golden years of King Edward VII’s reign, Rosie McCosh and her three very different sisters are growing up in an eccentric household in Kent, with their neighbours the Pitt boys on one side and the Pendennis boys on the other. But their days of childhood adventure are shadowed by the approach of war that will engulf them on the cusp of adulthood. When the boys end up scattered along the Western Front, Rosie faces the challenges of life for those left behind.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Edwardian England painted in a romantic canvas

  • By Wras on 29-07-15

The dust that falls from dreams

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-10-16

A rather morbid book concerning an middle-class family and the tragedy of the Great War and the related problems of love and disappointment in the following years. I thought that it plodded along and didn't have the flow of other devices Bernieres stories I have read previously.

19 of 22 people found this review helpful