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P. D. Smith

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  • 155
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Not bad

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-14

I'm actually enjoying the story, and I will probably get the sequels. It's quite enjoyable in itself.

The problems are:

- Ralph Lister's narration is absolutely fine - when he's reading the descriptive text. However, when he starts acting as the characters it all goes wrong. and he .. talks .. like .. this. He annunciates every word precisely, rather than as people actually talk. It's strange because he reads the rest of the book absolutely fine.

- I've been spoiled by Jack Campbell's Lost Fleet books. In those, he shows us the vastness of space, and the problems that combat in that environment would have. In Ark Royal, it's a bit more Star Wars-y, and space is very small. So, their ship jumps into a star system, and they get immediate communication from the planets asking who they are. Then, a bit later, an enemy ship arrives from a different direction, and a few minutes later they're in combat. Either they've discovered a way to have FTL travel, sensors and communication within a star system, or space has shrunk a bit.

- Also, there's a few scientific impossibilities (ignoring the normal Sci-fi ones, like FTL travel, etc) - eg the ship was 'orbiting a beacon' - that just can't work, unless the beacon is HUGE.

Apart from those little annoyances, it's not that bad a book. It could do with a bit of editing, and the voice acting is annoying, but, to me, the story's good enough to override that.

17 people found this helpful

Awesome

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-09-13

This is an amazing book. I loved the first book in the series, and I was a bit concerned by some of the reviews I'd read about the second book, but I needn't have worried.

This second book was more 'political' and 'scholarly' than the first book, with less emphasis on allomancy than the first one, but it was just as gripping and exciting, while giving us more insight into the characters and the nature of the landscape of the Final Empire.

Michael Kramer reads the books wonderfully and is totally captivating.

I also love the fact that it's child friendly, and hasn't turned into soft porn like some other sequels I've read recently... While it's not aimed at younger children, you could listen to it with them around without worrying. It's a great book for teens and adults.

2 people found this helpful

Very good

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-04-10

Great book by a great author. I like all L E Modesitt's books, so I was expecting good things from this new series. I wasn't disappointed.

I must admit that at the start, I wasn't too keen on the narrator's accent, but after a few chapters, I got used to it, and I now hope he narrates the rest of the series as well

I'm downloading the second book in the series now.

If you like Modesitt's Recluse series, you'll love this new series as well.

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-09

This is a very, very good thriller. It does start a bit slow, as others have said, but now I don't want to stop listening. I'll certainly be getting the sequels.

The only thing I would say is - don't listen to it with children around. There are some sex (rape, in fact) scenes described - not in a pornographic or gratuitous way, but I wouldn't want children to hear them by mistake...

Not great

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-06-09

I get the feeling I didn't quite 'get' this book. There were a couple of different threads going on in the story, and they seemed to be totally unrelated, so I'm not sure why they were in the same book...

I didn't like the narrator, and found that she didn't differentiate between the lead characters well, so I lost track of who was doing what.

Maybe I should have read/listened to the other Women's Murder Club books first, and this may have made more sense then, but after listening to this one, I'm not tempted to get the others.

1 person found this helpful

What a lovely book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-08

I really enjoyed this book, and so did the kids. 11 year old Charlie gets sent back in time from 2007 to 1952 where there's a case of mistaken identity and she finds herself enrolled in an open-air school (for delicate children), and meets up with Jack who is the only person who believes she's from the future.

The book was a good education on recent history for the children, (without them realising they were being educated!) It was excellently narrated and exciting enough that the kids kept asking to listen to more of it.

1 person found this helpful

Very enjoyable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-10-08

This book wasn't quite what I expected, but it was very good. It wasn't so much 'sci-fi' as an object lesson on the problems of breakthrough scientific discoveries etc.

Our two kids loved it though, and even asked for more books by the same author. I think this was because it was very good at looking at the issues from a child's perspective, with reactions from school-friends and so on, coming into it. It also gave the chance to talk about what 'extinction' was, and to talk about some of the currently endangered species which had become extinct by the time-frame of the book (which is set about 20 years in the future from now).

1 person found this helpful

Fun!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-10-08

What a fun book. My 7 year old son loved it as well (I just hope he doesn't get any ideas...)

2 people found this helpful

Very enjoyable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-10-08

What can I say, I really enjoyed this book. People will obviously draw comparisons between this and the DaVinci Code, but I liked this much more. I must admit that I really liked the fact that this book was based around a myth other than the Holy Grail or similar.

Great book.

3 people found this helpful

Nice historical fiction

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-10-08

I've not heard/read anything by C.J.Sansom before, but I will certainly get more of his books in the future.

I was a bit confused at the start by the references to 'Cromwell' at the same time as Henry VIII, but then I worked out it was Thomas Cromwell (not Oliver, but his great-great-uncle).

There were the usual gruesome murders that you can expect from this genre of fiction, and, I'll have to admit, that it was only near the end that I worked out who did it. There was also lots of interesting background about life in the Tudor period, and the dissolution of the monasteries and the Reformation.

2 people found this helpful