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Christian

Koebenhavn V, Denmark
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  • The Cuckoo's Calling

  • Cormoran Strike, Book 1
  • By: Robert Galbraith
  • Narrated by: Robert Glenister
  • Length: 15 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,231
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,457
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,435

When a troubled model falls to her death from a snow-covered Mayfair balcony, it is assumed that she has committed suicide. However, her brother has his doubts, and calls in private investigator Cormoran Strike to look into the case.Strike is a war veteran - wounded both physically and psychologically - and his life is in disarray. The case gives him a financial lifeline, but it comes at a personal cost: the more he delves into the young model's complex world, the darker things get - and the closer he gets to terrible danger...

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining and likeable

  • By Dragon on 06-05-13

Brilliant performance and above average narrative

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-13

With a brilliant performance by reader Robert Glenister, The Cuckoo's Calling really springs into life: Accents, emotions and shifts between characters is conveyed expertly and the editing is absolutely seamless. The narrative itself is almost cinematic in scope, allowing the listener to easily create very vivid mental pictures, for example at the absolute beginning of the book; Luna falling to her death from a tall building, the upwards rush of wind lifting her hair and sculpting her dress, a pool of red on newly fallen snow, innocent even, as lights flicker on and people rush the street. A surprised scream and moment of rushing, beautiful silence before the chaos.

This will be one book where, in two years time, you'll be glad you read the book before you saw the film. While the book does, I suppose, "go on a bit", the performance by the reader sees you through any narrative downturn to the point where you hardly notice.

I doubt anyone would regret this purchase.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls

  • By: David Sedaris
  • Narrated by: David Sedaris
  • Length: 6 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 600
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 551
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 551

A guy walks into a bar.From here, the story could take many turns. A guy walks into a bar and meets the love of his life. A guy walks into a bar and finds no one else is there. When this guy is David Sedaris, the possibilities are endless, but the result is always the same: he will both delight you with twists of humour and intelligence and leave you deeply moved. In Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, Sedaris remembers his father's dinnertime attire (shirtsleeves and underpants), his first colonoscopy (remarkably pleasant), and the time he considered buying the skeleton of a murdered Pygmy. The common thread? Sedaris masterfully turns each episode into a love story: how it feels to be in a relationship where one loves and is loved over many years, what it means to be part of a family, and how it's possible, through all of life's absurdities, to accept oneself. With Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, David Sedaris shows once again why he has been called 'A humorist par excellence, he can make Woody Allen appear ham-tongued, Oscar Wilde a drag' (Observer).

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • funny and often disturbing

  • By Marcus on 17-07-13

I'm quite the fan of Mr. Sedaris

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-13

This book has been out for a while, but I thought I'd review it just the same, even if I'm just adding another voice to the choir.

I thought his last book, Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary, was a bit of a misstep, but with Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls David Sedaris is to back to form. Form, of course, being the wry comedic essays in which he excels above any other. If you enjoyed any of his other books, you'll like this one too. It's that simple. If you know about David Sedaris from listening to the BBC Radio 4 specials he did, you'll be sad to know that quite a few of the stories from those sessions are also included in this book. However, his stories and his performance deserves at least a second listen, if not a third or even a fourth and fifth, so don't let that put you off.

If you enjoy David Sedaris, you might also like David Rakoff and the CBS radioprogram Wiretap with Jonathan Goldstein.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Midnight in Peking

  • The Murder That Haunted the Last Days of Old China
  • By: Paul French
  • Narrated by: Crawford Logan
  • Length: 8 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 141
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 116

Who killed Pamela Werner? On a frozen night in January 1937, in the dying days of colonial Peking, a body was found under the haunted watchtower. It was Pamela Werner, the teenage daughter of the city’s former British consul, Edward Werner. Her heart had been removed. A horrified world followed the hunt for Pamela’s killer, with a Chinese-British detective team pursuing suspects including a blood-soaked rickshaw puller, the Triads, and a lascivious grammar school headmaster. But the case was soon forgotten amid the carnage of the Japanese invasion...by all but Edward Werner.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible story

  • By Caroline on 09-02-13

Exciting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-13

Without a doubt one of the better audiobooks in my audible library. The subject matter, the setting, the narrative pace and the extraordinarily gifted reader all blend together to form an unforgettable listening experience.



This is one of the few audiobooks that I know I'll return to in a year or so. My experience was enhanced by having read other historical documents from this era of Peking, but the political inner turmoil as documented here through the lens of a suspicious murder, corrupt officials and chinese folklore was just tremendously enjoyable.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Rivers of London

  • Rivers of London, Book 1
  • By: Ben Aaronovitch
  • Narrated by: Kobna Holdbrook-Smith
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,334
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,033
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,023

My name is Peter Grant and until January, I was just probationary constable in that mighty army for justice known to all right-thinking people as the Metropolitan Police Service (and as the Filth to everybody else). My only concerns in life were how to avoid a transfer to the Case Progression Unit - we do paperwork so real coppers don't have to - and finding a way to climb into the panties of the outrageously perky WPC Leslie May. Then one night, in pursuance of a murder inquiry, I tried to take a witness statement from someone who was dead but disturbingly voluble....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • brilliant original story great narrator

  • By valb on 05-08-11

Not my cup of tea (I'm not even sure that was tea)

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-03-13

I realize I'm in the minority here, but this book isn’t working for me. At first I thought it was the reader as, like others, I was at first put off by his reading style, but later I learned to accept it or at least ignore it. Then I came to a scene set inside a cinema and the sheer amount of inane details in the straight up banal description finally made me delete the book (incidentally, the cinema scene ends with “that’s three hours of my life I’ll never get back”). It’s not that the reader pauses frequently to catch his breath, sigh or have a drink of water off-mic, it’s the text. The text is awful. The British comedian Stewart Lee once mocked Dan Brown as a man who writes sentences such as “The famous man looked at the red cup”, had the author of Rivers of London written the same sentence, it would probably have been "applying my trained coppers eye behind my newly purchased wayfarer sunglasses, which I purchased online, from sunglasshut for 80 hard-earned British Pound Sterling, using a station-anchored personal computer terminal in the lobby of the Cromwell police station, I fixed my gaze upon the man, five-foot-seven in height and with a weight above the average Londoner, this man, known for his work of historical fiction of a fantastic or supernatural bent, and observed how he, wearing a brown leather coat one or two sizes too small for a man of his heft, suspiciously eyed the red goblet in an unusual manner only recognised by a copper."

My review may seem harsh in the light of the other reviews, proving that many people do enjoy the book, it’s just that I didn’t. The book seems completely unedited. Thank God for audible’s return policy.

141 of 170 people found this review helpful