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Greg Gauthier

London, UK
  • 29
  • reviews
  • 21
  • helpful votes
  • 43
  • ratings
  • The Physicist and the Philosopher

  • Einstein, Bergson, and the Debate That Changed Our Understanding of Time
  • By: Jimena Canales
  • Narrated by: Kevin Free
  • Length: 14 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 3

Jimena Canales introduces listeners to the revolutionary ideas of Einstein and Bergson, describes how they dramatically collided in Paris, and traces how this clash of worldviews reverberated across the twentieth century. She shows how it provoked responses from figures such as Bertrand Russell and Martin Heidegger and carried repercussions for American pragmatism, logical positivism, phenomenology, and quantum mechanics.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Incredibly engrossing, despite uneven reading

  • By Greg Gauthier on 18-01-19

Incredibly engrossing, despite uneven reading

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-01-19

The author's treatment of the subject was mind blowing, covering everything from the personal psychology of these two men, to the social history of the debate, to the global politics, and finally the science and metaphysics involved in the questions swirling around the debate. What debate? The nature of space and time, and how we come to know that nature. It's a debate as old as Parmenides and Heraclitus, and thier names even pop up in the later chapters.

The reader was clear and well paced, but there were a number of bad edits, and the reader really struggled with German pronunciations. Which is unfortunate, since he had to read the titles of numerous scientific publications by Einstein, Reichenbach, and others, as well as the names of several German newspapers and organizations.

Despite this, I would still strongly recommend the book to the layman looking for clarity on one of western civilization's most pressing and enduring philosophical questions.

  • Science and Spiritual Practices

  • Reconnecting Through Direct Experience
  • By: Rupert Sheldrake
  • Narrated by: Rupert Sheldrake
  • Length: 8 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63

By the author of The Science Delusion, a detailed account of how science can authenticate spirituality. In this pioneering audiobook, Rupert Sheldrake shows how science helps validate seven practices on which all religions are built and which are part of our common human heritage. The effects of spiritual practices are now being investigated scientifically as never before, and many studies have shown that religious and spiritual practices generally make people happier and healthier.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • brilliant

  • By Anonymous User on 30-04-18

I wanted more, but it was interesting still...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-08-18

Sheldrake reads with a soporifically rhythmic drone. His arguments are superficial and easily disputable. Though, he does score at least three good insights: first, Contra Peterson, he points out that dragon myths regularly involve the voluntary surrender of an innocent, for the sake of the group; second, spiritual practice, while often demonstrating positive health effects, tend to do so more profoundly in actual believers rather than secular practitioners; third, that panpsychists may have the easiest of all the hypotheses to prove, in postulating a property common to all matter, rather than the alternative of dualism or the materialist denial of consciousness altogether. Probably, his previous book would provide better arguments on all three counts than this one, if you're a critical reader.

  • Maps of Meaning

  • By: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 30 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 352
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 321
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 318

From the author of 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos comes a provocative hypothesis that explores the connection between what modern neuropsychology tells us about the brain and what rituals, myths, and religious stories have long narrated. A cutting-edge work that brings together neuropsychology, cognitive science, and Freudian and Jungian approaches to mythology and narrative, Maps of Meaning presents a rich theory that makes the wisdom and meaning of myth accessible to the critical modern mind.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don't hesitate. Just buy it.

  • By Jonathan on 13-06-18

Insightful to the point of prophetic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-08-18

As an amateur philosopher, I have had occasion to read Nietzsche and Kirkegaard, and have long pondered the problem of value, and the problem of evil. For all my study, I have never come across quite so comprehensive a response to these problems, as I found in this book (also nicely summarized in chapters 8, 9 and 10 of Petersons new book). Though his answer is not definitive, it is thorough and authoritative, covering areas of study as diverse as clinical psychology, folk wisdom, analytical and continental philosophy, dream analysis, neuropsychology, anthropology, and of course religion. It took me nearly two months to finish this book, and it was well worth the slog. I have a dramatically deeper appreciation for the mytho-poetic view of life, an improved awareness of the significance of symbolic interpretation of phenomenal experience, and even a new way to look at Jamesian Pragmatism. If Catholic priests and lay-teachers were as adept at explaining the significance of Catholic doctrine and myth, as Peterson is of explication of the Augustinian view, I might still be a Catholic (albeit, agnostic). If you can summon the will to read this book, please do yourself and the world a favor, and do it.

  • The Long Shadow of the Ancient Greek World

  • By: The Great Courses, Ian Worthington
  • Narrated by: Ian Worthington
  • Length: 25 hrs
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26

Immerse yourself in this comprehensive survey of ancient Greece from 750 to 323 B.C.-from the emergence of Greece at the end of the Dark Ages to the final disintegration of Greek autonomy through the Macedonian kings Philip II and Alexander the Great.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good

  • By mr on 18-03-14

Thorough, entertaining, and insightful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-18

Professor Worthington's lectures are a treasure trove of insight into the early history of Western Civilization, and what we see when we peer into that ancient cradle, is that this baby is as ugly as it is beautiful. One thing I have always appreciated about good lecturers, is their ability to spin a narrative that is both self-critical and self-affirming, and Worthington does a masterful job of it.

  • Plato's Phaedo

  • By: Plato
  • Narrated by: Ray Childs
  • Length: 2 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3

Socrates is in prison, sentenced to die when the sun sets. In this final conversation, he asks what will become of him once he drinks the poison prescribed for his execution. Socrates and his friends examine several arguments designed to prove that the soul is immortal. This quest leads him to the broader topic of the nature of mind and its connection not only to human existence but also to the cosmos itself. What could be a better way to pass the time between now and the sunset?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Well performed, but weak translation and editing

  • By Greg Gauthier on 12-04-18

Well performed, but weak translation and editing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-18

I really enjoy the performances of the troupe that did this series of recordings of the Dialogues, but the translations are odd, only vaguely follow the Jowett, and are often edited so as to remove entire passages. Sadly, there is no better version of the Phaedo.

  • An Introduction to Greek Philosophy

  • By: David Roochnik, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: David Roochnik
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21

More than 2,500 years later, the fundamental questions asked by the ancient Greeks continue to challenge, fascinate, and instruct us. Is reality stable and permanent or is it always changing? Are ethical values like justice and courage relative? What is justice? What is happiness? How shall we best live our lives?In this series of 24 lectures, Professor Roochnik invites you to join this eternal discussion.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent introduction to Greek philosophy

  • By Gery Lynch on 26-03-14

Engaging, coherent, and thought provoking

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-17

Dr. Roochnick is a well versed and engaging lecturer on the Greeks. Though his style isn't quite as entertaining as Dr. Robinson, his ability to bind the threads of the presocratics together within the looms of Plato and Aristotle make these lectures well worth the effort.

  • Plato's Republic

  • By: The Great Courses, David Roochnik
  • Narrated by: Professor David Roochnik Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 92
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 92

More than 2,000 years later, Plato's Republic remains astonishingly relevant to our everyday lives. It poses one question after another that might well have been drawn from the headlines and debates of our nation's recent history: What sort of person should rule the state? Are all citizens equal before the law? Should everyone have equal access to health care? Plato's greater inquiry, however, was into the question of defining justice itself and the reasons why a person would choose a life aligned with that virtue.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Heartily recommended if you are new to Plato

  • By Mr. P. A. Gower on 02-01-14

Thorough, competent, somewhat insightful

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-08-17

The lecturer is difficult to listen to, at times. Occasionally, his analysis is shallow and perhaps a little off the mark, but there were a few really important insights that made listening well worth the effort. For example, looking at the republic not as a model city, but as a model soul.

  • Freedom Regained

  • The Possibility of Free Will
  • By: Julian Baggini
  • Narrated by: Barnaby Edwards
  • Length: 8 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9

Do we have free will? It's a question that has puzzled philosophers and theologians for centuries and feeds into numerous political, social, and personal concerns. Are we products of our culture or free agents within it? How much responsibility should we take for our actions? Are our neural pathways fixed early on by a mixture of nature and nurture, or is the possibility of comprehensive, intentional psychological change always open to us?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Better than the pig book

  • By Mr Chops on 21-07-15

Beware false dichotomies

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-17

Baggini does a fantastic job of dismantling the black-and-white dilemma of freedom versus determinism, and makes a strong case for thinking about the problem in terms of degrees (as a problem of 'vagueness', as it's called in traditional analytical circles). The more I study philosophy, the apparent it is to me that all philosophical problems are problems of vagueness: freedom, beauty, truth, goodness, happiness, and knowledge all involve layers of complex vagueness. One might argue that it is precisely the job of the philosopher to suss out the objects of clarity from this fog. I am inclined to be sympathetic to such an argument. But Baggini says that some things like freedom are inherently gray, and attempting to impose a black-and-white regime on the idea is a mistake. He doesn't reference this explicitly, but I am reminded of a famous Christian prayer that sums the final chapter of this book nicely: Lord, give me the courage to change the things I can, the patience to suffer the things I cannot, and the wisdom to know the difference...

  • Freedom Evolves

  • By: Daniel C. Dennett
  • Narrated by: Robert Blumenfeld
  • Length: 11 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12

Can there be freedom and free will in a deterministic world? Renowned philosopher Daniel Dennett emphatically answers "yes!" Using an array of provocative formulations, Dennett sets out to show how we alone among the animals have evolved minds that give us free will and morality. Weaving a richly detailed narrative, Dennett explains in a series of strikingly original arguments - drawing upon evolutionary biology, cognitive neuroscience, economics, and philosophy - that far from being an enemy of traditional explorations of freedom, morality, and meaning, the evolutionary perspective can be an indispensable ally.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, but deflationary...

  • By Greg Gauthier on 26-06-17

Brilliant, but deflationary...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-06-17

There are some great and insightful arguments for compatibilism in this book. A few, I plan to deploy in my own way. But I wish someone would just come out and say explicitly, that there is simply no such thing as freedom OR determinism, and therefore, there is nothing to make "compatibile". Dennett gets very close to this, a few times, but never quite gets there. We simply don't quite understand what we're talking about, with regard to human action and intention, and these categories of "free will" and "determinism" are like the difference between Ptolemy and Kepler. As Copernicus showed, they were BOTH wrong.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Age of Genius

  • The Seventeenth Century and the Birth of the Modern Mind
  • By: A. C. Grayling
  • Narrated by: Ric Jerrom
  • Length: 14 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 29

The Age of Genius explores the eventful intertwining of outward event and inner intellectual life to tell, in all its richness and depth, the story of the 17th century in Europe. It was a time of creativity unparalleled in history before or since, from science to the arts, from philosophy to politics. Acclaimed philosopher and historian A. C. Grayling points to three primary factors that led to the rise of vernacular (popular) languages in philosophy, theology, science, and literature.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enlightening and inspiring.

  • By Anthony Christie on 28-04-16

Impeccable research, choppy narrative

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-06-17

Grayling is the go-to resource, in my view, for a careful and nuanced understanding of any subject. This book is no exception. But I would recommend reading it rather than listening to it, because at times, you will get lost in a maze of complex character interactions and philosophical musings, that would be easier to cope with, if one could stop on certain passages to reflect.