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Exarabia

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Author 3 - 0 Narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-15

Would you try another book written by Rosamund Lupton or narrated by Rachel Atkins and Harriet Carmichael ?

Having thoroughly enjoyed Sister and Afterwards I was looking forward to The Quality of Silence, and the plot was of interest to me as I have a very young close relative who is profoundly deaf. Untenable for me was the performance of Yasmin's narrator. The writing is good, the Alaskan landscape is well drawn, but some of the vocabulary obviously was new to the narrator. Surely in that situation the narrator should find out how to pronounce those words rather than just have a stab in the dark? Notable were 'mitochondria', 'proton', and napalm'. I really don't know how you can get those wrong. 'Lichen' waxed and waned sometimes 'lich' and at other times 'like'. I know the jury is still out on this one but the majority would go with 'liken' I'm sure. We had Bescherelle mangled, and the Seine, it is Sen, not Sain, ask any Frenchman. These are just a few I can quickly recall. And don't get me started on 'lieutenant'... I liked the characters, and the description was up to conjuring images in the mind's eye, but the whole story was incredibly far-fetched and I found myself asking time and time again, 'would one really do that?' It was overall a disappointing experience.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

A grating experience

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-15

What disappointed you about The Lake House?

Another supposedly easy listen ruined by dreadful narration. Why, oh why, does this narrator insist on attempting regional accents of which she is so blatantly uninformed? In this recording we have efforts at Scottish (I know only because the character's origin is detailed), what I imagine is meant to be the West Country, and London, all mangled, often mixed, and with some of the most excruciating mauling of vowels I have ever heard. All this with undertones of an Australian lilt. If the story warranted it I would buy the print version instead. Alas, it doesn't.

34 of 35 people found this review helpful

Buy the print version

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-04-13

I was lucky enough to hear Dr Steve Peters speak recently and was totally taken in by the simplicity and logic of his chimp theory. I loved the analogy of chimp behaviour versus human behaviour, and the sense it suddenly made of previously inexplicable, random and bizarre behaviour, not only in myself but in those around me.

However, I would have to recommend that people buy the print version and read it for themselves. If I hadn't actually seen the man and heard him speak I would probably have abandoned the audio version after five minutes. The narration is flat, dull and repetitive. Dr Peters knows his stuff, in person he can deliver it well and doesn't need prompts. Sadly he read this as if the content were completely new to him. There was no warmth or humour in the delivery of the recording which had been so evident in the man in person. Such a shame...

42 of 49 people found this review helpful

Nothing but praise

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-04-13

This is a powerful story of family ties, betrayal, enduring love, and unfathomable hope. Boyden portrays the vast northern wilderness, the conflict between 'progress' and 'the old ways', the attitudes of the young, and the battlefield of drink and drug abuse with a compassion that brings tears to one's eyes. He writes beautifully.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Disappointing

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-13

I do not often go into print over such matters, and I do not often download an audio book that I CANNOT listen too. However I feel compelled to comment on the dreadful narration of this novel by Caroline Lee. Whilst I can accept an Australian accent narrating an Australian author's work I cannot for the life of me think why she had to attempt a Geordie accent (at least that's what I assume it is supposed to be) for part of the novel. I have lost all interest in any plot there may have been as all I can hear is the appalling narration. I am two hours into a twenty hour tale, and alas I can tolerate it no longer.

Whilst warming to my theme I ask also why it is that narrators, if unsure, do not check the correct pronunciation of words in a reliable dictionary rather than unleashing their errors on an unsuspecting public? Also why oh why do many ignore the noun verb rule for syllable stress? One may be a REsearch scientist (noun) who carries out reSEARCH (verb). I for one proTEST loudly (verb) when narrators, or newsreaders for that matter, do not adhere to this simple rule. Perhaps I should summon a PROtest rally (noun).

All I can say is buy the paper version or don't bother...

31 of 33 people found this review helpful