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Dror Speiser

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 7
  • helpful votes
  • 10
  • ratings
  • The Darwinian Revolution

  • By: Frederick Gregory, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Frederick Gregory
  • Length: 12 hrs and 8 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6

Published 150 years ago, Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species - the text that introduced the world to natural selection - is among a handful of books that have changed the world. But the route to that status has been surprisingly circuitous and uncertain. Now, in 24 absorbing lectures by an award-winning teacher, you'll learn the remarkable story of Darwin's ideas, how scientists and religious leaders reacted to them, and the sea change in human thought that resulted.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Modern Scientific Cosmos

  • By Alistair on 16-10-15

great lengthy history tale of evolution

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-06-15

history, evolution, politics, science, theology, lots of ideas, findings, bones and stuff that's really interesting.

  • How We Learn

  • By: Monisha Pasupathi, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Monisha Pasupathi
  • Length: 11 hrs and 42 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82

Learning is a lifelong adventure.It starts in your mother's womb, accelerates to high speed in infancy and childhood, and continues through every age. Whether you're actively engaged in mastering a new skill, intuitively discovering an unfamiliar place, or even sleeping-which is fundamental to helping you consolidate and hold on to what you've learned-you are truly born to learn around the clock.But few of us know how we learn, which is the key to learning and studying more effectively.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • great for scientist minds

  • By Dror Speiser on 27-05-15

great for scientist minds

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-05-15

the lectures are mostly a long list of experiments, contemplations on their results, and some interesting suggestions here and there.
for an inquisitive mind, that needs data as well as thought, this is great.
people who want to be told how to learn better, are looking in the wrong place.
I really liked the format and the super interesting content. it really goes over a lot of stuff in learning theory.
the lecturer is mostly ok, engaging and positive. but, a bit slow for me. also, there are a lot of pauses in the audio - complete silent seconds. as in a second here, a second there. I found this very annoying, and it makes the experience not so good.
BUT! I solved both my problems by listening to lectures at 1.25 speed (as I do for most Great Courses products anyway).
And I already feel like I could listen to this again.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • This Explains Everything

  • Deep, Beautiful, and Elegant Theories of How the World Works
  • By: John Brockman
  • Narrated by: Ann Marie Lee, Michelle Ford, Peter Berkrot, and others
  • Length: 12 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 18

In This Explains Everything, John Brockman, founder and publisher of Edge.org, asked experts in numerous fields and disciplines to come up with their favorite explanations for everyday occurrences. Why do we recognize patterns? Is there such a thing as positive stress? Are we genetically programmed to be in conflict with each other? Those are just some of the 150 questions that the world's best scientific minds answer with elegant simplicity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • great short stories from the greatest minds

  • By Dror Speiser on 06-05-15

great short stories from the greatest minds

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-15

this book is good for drives, waiting in line, bathroom, falling asleep and maybe even regular reading.

every answer is a gem.
every answer can be read many times over.

but don't fooled. you need serious concentration to understand most answers. which makes it all the more fun.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Einstein's Relativity and the Quantum Revolution: Modern Physics for Non-Scientists, 2nd Edition

  • By: Richard Wolfson, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Richard Wolfson
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 344
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 308
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 301

"It doesn't take an Einstein to understand modern physics," says Professor Wolfson at the outset of these 24 lectures on what may be the most important subjects in the universe: relativity and quantum physics. Both have reputations for complexity. But the basic ideas behind them are, in fact, simple and comprehensible by anyone. These dynamic and illuminating lectures begin with a brief overview of theories of physical reality starting with Aristotle and culminating in Newtonian or "classical" physics. After that, you'll follow along as Professor Wolfson outlines the logic that led to Einstein's profound theory of special relativity and the simple yet far-reaching insight on which it rests. With that insight in mind, you'll move on to consider Einstein's theory of general relativity and its interpretation of gravitation in terms of the curvature of space and time.From there, you'll embark on a dazzling exploration of how inquiry into matter at the atomic and subatomic scales led to quandaries that are resolved-or at least clarified-by quantum mechanics, a vision of physical reality so profound and so at odds with our experience that it nearly defies language.By bringing relativity and quantum mechanics into the same picture, you'll chart the development of fascinating hypotheses about the origin, development, and possible futures of the entire universe, as well as the possibility that physics can produce a "theory of everything" to account for all aspects of the physical world. But the goal throughout these lectures remains the same: to present the key ideas of modern physics in a way that makes them clear to the interested layperson.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyable and informative, but...

  • By Sparding on 08-04-15

mostly nice material

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-15

after listening to this, I now understand the essence of relatively, special and general, and quantum physics.

I am a mathematician by trade.
this means I could understand everything without much effort, but I can't judge how it would be for others. it also means that I found the repetitions boring, and they happen a lot.

the biggest problem by far is the lecturer's tone, attitude, and style. he is way too loud. he tends to repeat those statements that he shouts. drilling his point on relativity really feels like a drill after the umpteenth repetition. sometimes he'll ask a question, go silent for one second, then bark a prelude to the answer. I got a jolt every time.

all in all, I came out more knowledgeable and wise, but somewhat shell shocked.

  • How Music Works

  • The Science and Psychology of Beautiful Sounds, from Beethoven to the Beatles and Beyond
  • By: John Powell
  • Narrated by: Walter Dixon
  • Length: 8 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 80
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 40
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 41

Have you ever wondered how off-key you are while singing in the shower? Or if your Bob Dylan albums really sound better on vinyl? Or why certain songs make you cry? Now, scientist and musician John Powell invites you on an entertaining journey through the world of music. Discover what distinguishes music from plain old noise, how scales help you memorize songs, what the humble recorder teaches you about timbre (assuming your suffering listeners don’t break it first), and more.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Music is my business

  • By M. Russell on 24-03-11

Nice book about music

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-15

the book gives details on the history and making of music, in more senses than one.
anyone who hasn't studied history or the mathematics behind music will find this book rewarding. this will include most musicians.

hearing the discussions on strings and organ tubes organized ideas in my head that I might have had before, but not well stored.

the author's and narrator's pace are good, humor is mostly funny, and the narrator does a good job signing sometimes.

the additional excerpts by the author are very informative. I would suspect most people, including musicians, haven't heard notes from an instrument without the begining of the note, and most will not be able to identify the instrument the author plays in one of his examples . this excerpt, and others like it, really make you think, and understand, how music works.

I do wish there was more about the history of instruments and pitches and so on, and also more audio excerpts of actual music to really bring home some of the points.

I have also listened to The Great Courses lectures on music, and I think they complement each other well, even if overlapping by quite a bit.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful