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Christoph Fischer

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  • 28
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Mixed feelings

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-12-17

Started off really interesting but unfortunately it seemed too much of the same. Characters and stories seemed a little too anglicised to be convincing as Greek Myths
I'm sure plenty of people will enjoy this as it's - as everything by Stephen Fry - clever and neat. I studied Ancient Greek at school and loved being reminded of the stories but I didn't quite feel it all came together for me

8 of 10 people found this review helpful

Great writing but a long wait for the action

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-10-17

The narrative voice of the protagonist is intense and compelling, the sense of an important message, unbelievable crime and a revelation that is to come runs through the entire book.
Eileen is shown with a raw honesty and an amazing ability of self-reflection and analysis, which makes her a marvellous character you want to know more about.
We learn more and more about her childhood, her current predicament and her job at the prison.
The story, however, tends to drag on, with long stretched with little action and a growing repetitiveness in the monologue as Eileen shares her inner thoughts and retells the story of one week before Christmas, when the arrival of Rebecca awakens something in her that had been dormant.
Many passages that seemed to be leading to the big crime and drama didn't go anywhere and I felt disappointed.
The long build-up evetually led to a let-down of sorts for me, I expected something different or more.
However, I must say I'm really glad I did read the story as the writing in many places is truly superb and Eileen and Rebecca are two characters I won't forget.
So judge for yourself. This is a book that cannot be dismissed, despite what I felt were weaknesses.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Some good information but many missed chances

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-10-17

Memoirs will always be a personal account of a life and therefor naturally miss out areas of lesser interest. That's the author's prerogative.
I missed more insights into the youth of the author, spent in WW2 Hungary. Later on there is far too much detail about his life in Communist Hungary, a truly terrible period in his life and so I can appreciate the unbalance. At the same time, I was beginning to skip forward suring that section,
I would have liked to learn more about the WW2 part and felt the general statements about how Hungarian knew little about what Hitler stood for difficult to comprehend, equally the passage about the homosexual communist party official, whose 'perversions' gave the author an advantage.
I found it hard to listen to a female voice narrating a man's story in the first person, which kept me at a distance to the story often.
All that said, there are great passages and informative and thought-provoking snippets.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

A voice of reason in utterly mad times

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-10-17

An absolute delight and a much-needed infusion of reason in an era of utterly mad politics. All that Clegg says makes so much sense: His assessment of the referendum, it's legitimacy, it's results and mostly, it's consequences and validity.
As the referendum has been over a year ago and evidence mounts on false promises and seriously damaging consequences we need to reassess the situation, not stick by our guns in a false sense of loyalty to a narrow once-pff snapshot of the electorate.
Regardless of your opinion on Brexit, there is a lot of political wisdom and analysis of errors in our thinking. It's brilliant.
While I;m not sure a movement, such as Momentum was for Labour, could stop Brexit via Conservative Party channels, I feel that the template letters at the end are an excellent tool.
Clegg remains one of the greatest political minds.

8 of 17 people found this review helpful

Rather surprised just how much I enjoyed this

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-10-17

This came highly recommended by a fellow blogger, so when I saw this as an audio book it was the perfect choice for me.
This is the story of a disgruntled astronaut who can't wait to leave earth behind but then gets entangled - via phone calls - with a family and their unique problems. At times I found it too far-fetched maybe and implausible, yet, I couldn't stop listening. The narrator does an excellent job at various accents and at a lively impersonation of the odd characters. While you kind of figure there might be a happy ending somewhere lurking for us, you are kept on tender hooks and the way things work out are not quite what I had expected, for sure.
Likeable characters, feel-good moments a la "A wonderful life", humour, qitty observations of human behaviour and a few nice surprises await those who are ready to launch into this story.
I was surprised how much I missed Gladys, Tom and Claudia when the recording had ended. Definitely an author I'll be watching. Highly recommended.

Amazing food for thought

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-08-17

This is a rather comprehensive and detailed account of our concept of freedom, how there is more a delusion of freedom in modern society and lastly how to create freedom.
Well, to be honest, I don't know whether the title was chosen wisely. It implies an easy step-by-step guide, which I'm not sure we're getting here.
But what we're getting is brilliant. There are too many chapters to mention specifically all that is contained here. Highlights include myth-busting of the banking crisis, of euphemistic rhetoric, of mass manipulation, corporate greed and how all these things contribute to take more freedom from the many and give it to the few.
While this may sound like a conspiracy theory and left-wing anti-capitalism, it's far from it. Regardless of ideology, those mechanisms work and serve those in power.
Ultimately, it provides information with credible facts and data, only trying to give us the knowledge and understanding so we can make more informed decisions and stop being lied to and manipulated.
I think in times of Trump and Media moguls we all know how truth can become a commodity, as much as humans and nature have become commodities.
This book was an eye-opener for me, re-inforced some believes and taught me new things.
The message goes far beyond the political and I can only urge you to read this.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Rough Music cover art

Gay 'cult' classic read by the author

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-07-17

Beautiful and touching family drama
Loved the book when it first came out but had forgot a lot of it. I found myself returning to the awestruck wonder as I was getting back into it. Gale 's performance is excellent and I got to appreciate the story on a different level as through the acting some parts became clearer to me
Great story about family , secrets identity and moving on. My dogs are grateful for the extra long walks I took them on so I could listen to another chapter

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Hugely enjoyable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-04-17

Really enjoyable as family drama with strong romantic component that will appeal largely but not exclusively to female readers. The changing viewpoints provide depth to the unexpected separation of Daniel and Nesta. It affects their daughter Seren, too, who tries to find dirt on her father's new mistress, only to find surprises.
Quite slowly burning suspense builds up and comes to a crescendo.
I really enjoyed the characters in this novel and the impersonations by the narrator. Although I started this book in a busy period of my life, I raced through it, taking every opportunity to listen.
Most, I enjoyed the profound goodness of some of the characters and their admirable way to deal with bad situations in the right way. In our time of suing culture and increased self-involvement I found this book a refreshing reminder of human values, a cosy refuge with some amazing role models.
Pace and plotting are well handled and the narrator is making this a pleasure to read. Hugely enjoyable

Powerful and thought provoking

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-02-17

A moving and thoughtful account of a man training and working to save lives, only to be struck down by a statistically unlikely diagnosis of cancer himself. Incredibly well written for a man of science rather than poetry this shows an incredibly intellectual and moral man, explaining the big issues on the mind of a doctor while 'dancing with death and life'.
Very powerful reading and much food for thought.

Good and bad

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-02-17

The book depicts the history of this house near Berlin which saw inhabitants from the mid 1800s whose lives together make up a history lesson about Germany. German society and politics under the Kaiser, before and after WW1 and WW2 are illustrated through the series of owners and inhabitants of the house, including the author's ancestors.
Especially the early parts of the book were interesting, although much of the personal details of the inhabitants seemed unnecessary and the descriptive details were too concise to keep my attention all of the times.
The stories about the house after WW2 began to be more interesting again, with a variety of information about life in Eastern Germany that were impressive. Again, I felt uncomfortable knowing some of the more personal details of the inhanitants, thinking that I would not have that kind of information out there about me and my family.
At that point the book lost me again, as I wondered how ethical is was to document such information for the purpose of the book. It dawned on me that this was going to be a literary museum ratehr than an edited story.
The main point about the house is that many parties lay claim to it, due to changes of laws and misappropriations at various stages in history.
The house has become somewhat of a symbol of the history of Germany. Like I would in a museum, I wanted to skip the parts that weren't of interest to me and that contained too many details.
The ending made up for it with a rather moving last chapter and epilogue. Definitely recommended for people interested in European history and probably better read, as it is easier to skip parts and to benefit from the illustrations.