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MissyVBizzy

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  • The Stephen K Amos Talk Show (Series 2)

  • By: Stephen K Amos
  • Length: 4 hrs and 30 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12

Recorded live at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, comedian Stephen K Amos is back for another series of his talk show. As ever, Stephen invites some of his favourite stand ups to sit down for a chat about life, comedy and all the funny stuff in between. This is the closest you can get to being an insider at the world’s biggest comedy festival, via the banter of some of the funniest people on the planet. Expect deep insights, hilarious admissions, and outrageous anecdotes from the titans of comedy as well as the stars of the future. Each show also features an exclusive comedy performance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thoroughly enjoyable

  • By MissyVBizzy on 02-03-19

Thoroughly enjoyable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-03-19

Listening to this show is an uplifting treat, Great guests, funny and enlightening, Stephen K Amos is an excellent host.

  • Stephen Fry's Victorian Secrets

  • By: Stephen Fry
  • Length: 7 hrs and 40 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 544
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 512
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 512

On the surface, the Victorian age is one of propriety, industry, prudishness and piety. But scratch the surface and you’ll find scandal, sadism, sex, madness, malice and murder. Presented by Stephen Fry, this series delves deep into a period of time we think we know, to discover an altogether darker reality. The stories we’re told offer a different perspective on an era which underwent massive social change. As education, trade, technology and culture blossomed, why was there an undercurrent of the ‘forbidden’ festering beneath Victorian society?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Quintessential Englishman!

  • By Simon on 21-10-18

Entertaining and enlightening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-02-19

I’ve grown very fond of this series of audible essays in the secretive victorians. The first chapter wasn’t so hot but the subsequent chapters are a delight and not only enlighten my understanding of Victorian Britain but it gives great insight into modern times and our current society.

Steph Fry is even more witty and engaging than usual and I’ve become a real fan of his narration style, he’s a born narrator and teller of bedtime stories.

  • The Winter of the Witch

  • Winternight Trilogy, Book 3
  • By: Katherine Arden
  • Narrated by: Kathleen Gati
  • Length: 14 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 45

Moscow is in flames, leaving its people searching for answers - and someone to blame. Vasilisa, a girl with extraordinary gifts, must flee for her life, pursued by those who blame their misfortune on her magic. Then a vengeful demon returns, stronger than ever. Determined to engulf the world in chaos, he finds allies among men and spirits. Mankind and magical creatures alike find their fates resting on Vasya's shoulders. But she may not be able to save them all.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfect ending<br />

  • By Mrs U on 12-01-19

Magical

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-01-19

Finishing this was like losing a dear friend. I have come to adore Vaslisa Petrovna. One of the most magical series of books I’ve read/listened to in a long time. Wonderful characters and stories within the story

  • The Bear and the Nightingale

  • Winternight, Book 1
  • By: Katherine Arden
  • Narrated by: Kathleen Gati
  • Length: 11 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 375
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 343
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 341

In a village at the edge of the wilderness of Northern Russia, where the winds blow cold and the snow falls many months of the year, a stranger with piercing blue eyes presents a new father with a gift - a precious jewel on a delicate chain, intended for his young daughter. Uncertain of its meaning, the father hides the gift away, and his daughter, Vasya, grows up a wild, willful girl, to the chagrin of her family. But when mysterious forces threaten the happiness of their village, Vasya discovers that she may be the only one who can keep the darkness at bay.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Shades of good and bored

  • By S on 19-03-17

A Perfect Winter’s Tale

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-12-18

This is a truly wonderful magical story set in the Russian Forrest. I was absorbed and enthralled. Beautiful writing with really strong characters. Arden is a true master of storytelling. In Vasilisa Petrovka she creates a real heroine fighting on all fronts, not only does she have to fight against supernatural forces she has to fight convention and the strictures enforced on women of her era, she has the powers of the old world, yes she’s a witch with witch’s powers but she’s also a witch fighting for her place in the world. A young woman, gathering wisdom and courage Vasilisa is a memorable heroine I have completely falleyin love with. I’m about to start the second book in the trilogy and I cannot wait to see how Vasilisa naviagates the world.

The only detractor for me is Kate Gati’s narration. It took quite a while to get used to as she has a light voice and as a European it’s a big odd to listen to an American reading an East European narrative and her faux Russian accent, but I did get used to it and I really enjoyed the book, but yes as someone of Polish origin, I found it a bit weird, I grew up on these sorts of stories, so yes I do feel a bit of sadness about cultural appropriation and there’s an absence of the real Russian humour, (yes Russians do have a good and unique sense of humour), but having read the authors opening words, I know that she’s aware that she’s a non-Russian writing about old Russia, and she pays respect to that, and she’s obviously a Russian scholar, her writing is wonderful all the same and she did transport me to the old world so much so I was on Wikipedia searching flights to my family’s part of the world and yearning for the deep winter.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful