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Tristan

  • 6
  • reviews
  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 42
  • ratings
  • 48 Laws of Power

  • By: Robert Greene
  • Narrated by: Richard Poe
  • Length: 23 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 996
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 871
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 874

Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this piercing work distills 3,000 years of the history of power into 48 well-explicated laws. This bold volume outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, Carl von Clausewitz, and other infamous strategists. The 48 Laws of Power will fascinate any listener interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Too little nuance

  • By Santiago on 17-10-16

A great book to listen to and refer back to later

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-16

I was really impressed by the quality of lessons in this book. It's a long one, and while it can feel repetitive sometimes as a few of the hostorical characters and stories used to illustrate are appear a number of times the overall effect is a good one. Each story comes with an analysis, further examples and notes on possible reversals to each situation. Well thought out and a great book.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • This Idea Must Die

  • Scientific Theories That Are Blocking Progress
  • By: John Brockman
  • Narrated by: David Colacci, Susan Ericksen
  • Length: 16 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15

Each year,John Brockman, publisher of Edge.org, challenges some of the world's greatest scientists, artists, and philosophers to answer a provocative question crucial to our time. In 2014 he asked 175 brilliant minds to ponder: What scientific idea needs to be put aside in order to make room for new ideas to advance? The answers are as surprising as they are illuminating.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Very informative but a tough listen

  • By Tristan on 13-03-15

Very informative but a tough listen

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-03-15

This book contains some excellent concepts and good insight into improving scientific processes in the future.

On the downside however is that these are grouped together in very similar themes which quickly can become monotonous. You may, as I did, find you have inadvertently switched off and missed listening for several minutes at a time.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Icarus Deception

  • How High Will You Fly?
  • By: Seth Godin
  • Narrated by: Seth Godin
  • Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 255
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 201

In his bravest and most challenging book yet, Seth Godin shows how we can thrive in an economy that rewards art, not compliance. He explains why true innovators focus on trust, remarkability, leadership, and stories that spread. And he makes a passionate argument for why you should be treating your work as art. Art is not a gene or a specific talent. It's an attitude, available to anyone who has a vision that others don't, and the guts to do something about it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The connection economy

  • By Neil on 12-07-13

Classic Seth if a little underwhelming

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-15

This is a worthwhile book with an argument which will help any reader understand the merits of initiative if they weren't believers before.

Personally I prefer Godins blog posts which, while covering topics in less detail get to the heart of their topics quickly.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The (Honest) Truth about Dishonesty

  • How We Lie to Everyone - Especially Ourselves
  • By: Dan Ariely
  • Narrated by: Simon Jones
  • Length: 8 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 105
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 78

Fascinating and provocative, Dan Ariely’s The (Honest) Truth about Dishonesty is an insightful and brilliantly researched take on cheating, deception, and willpower. The internationally best-selling author pulls no punches when it comes to home truths. His previous titles Predictably Irrational and The Upside of Irrationality have become classics in their field, revealing astonishing traits that run through modern humankind. Now acclaimed behavioural economist Dan Ariely delves deeper into psychology.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It's yourself you have to fool!

  • By Jim Vaughan on 15-05-13

Overall solid but fairly unsurprising research.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-01-15

This was an enjoyable listen and well performed.

The bonus interviews included at the end were a nice surprise.

  • Pay Attention!

  • How to Listen, Respond, and Profit from Customer Feedback
  • By: Ann Thomas, Jill Applegate
  • Narrated by: Tara Ochs
  • Length: 6 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars 1

Customers are speaking loud and clear through a miriad of mediums. Evidence shows that customers will no longer stand for the hurried and complacent service that has become the norm. They are looking for a positive, memorable experience. Organizations that provide that level of service will earn their loyalty. Customers base their decisions on nothing more than a positive or negative review of your product and/or service. Pay Attention! paves the way.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Very disappointing. Please don't buy this book

  • By Tristan on 10-10-14

Very disappointing. Please don't buy this book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-14

Would you try another book written by Ann Thomas and Jill Applegate or narrated by Tara Ochs?

I would not.

What was most disappointing about Ann Thomas and Jill Applegate ’s story?

The book is a collection of vaguely defined 'real life' examples of where businesses have had successes and failures with customer feedback predominantly based around social media. What frustrated me most was the extremely basic and repetitive nature in which these cases were presented. There is a prevailing attitude of 'this is so obvious' advice throughout the title which all the while is at odds with the severe lack of genuine content which would entitle the authors to dispense such an opinion.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The narrator (although not to be blamed for the books content) reads each passage from what should probably have been titled as the 'customer feedback social media bloopers' section with irritating glee. Incidentally these bloopers make up the majority of the material so strap yourselves in.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

I was overwhelmed by the image of two middle aged women crowing (probably over a few glasses of wine) to one another about how modern and techy savvy they are regarding modern forms of customer feedback. Imagine these women lecturing you using jargon ridden language and a literary style similar to newsagents cheap gossip magazines.

Any additional comments?

My overriding ambition is that no one accidentally purchase this book on the false premise that there may be some content of value within it. This false bounty will instead lead the reader to discover this couldn't be further from the truth. I hope for them to avoid how I felt, duty bound to find a scrap of worth somewhere to make the journey worthwhile.

  • The Year Without Pants

  • WordPress.com and the Future of Work
  • By: Scott Berkun
  • Narrated by: Chris Kayser
  • Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 22

50 million websites, or 20 percent of the entire web, use WordPress software. The force behind WordPress.com is a convention-defying company called Automattic, Inc., whose 120 employees work from anywhere in the world they wish, barely use email, and launch improvements to their products dozens of times a day. With a fraction of the resources of Google, Amazon, or Facebook, they have a similar impact on the future of the Internet. How is this possible? What's different about how they work, and what can other companies learn from their methods? Find out....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting insight into how they work remotely

  • By Rad on 08-01-17

Disappointing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-14

Would you try another book written by Scott Berkun or narrated by Chris Kayser?

If they were written in a similar style to this? Then no

What will your next listen be?

MoneyBall

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Year Without Pants?

I would have cut all the meaningless drawl and scene setting from in between the genuinely useful information about working styles, company ideology and team structure. He goes on and on about useless information like details about the furniture in the room or something mildly amusing about a team night out or character quirk... None of these are of any interest or the least bit funny.