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clive

  • 28
  • reviews
  • 88
  • helpful votes
  • 192
  • ratings
  • Manhattan Beach

  • By: Jennifer Egan
  • Narrated by: Heather Lind, Norbert Leo Butz, Vincent Piazza
  • Length: 15 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 142
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 132

Anna Kerrigan, nearly 12 years old, accompanies her father to the house of a man who, she gleans, is crucial to the survival of her father and her family. Anna observes the uniformed servants, the lavishing of toys on the children and some secret pact between her father and Dexter Styles. Years later her father has disappeared, and the country is at war. Anna works at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, where women are allowed to hold jobs that had always belonged to men.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A clever and intriguing novel

  • By Marie on 08-04-18

Gripping and beautifully written

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-17

Another great novel from Jennifer Egan. Gripping and beautifully written - with a strong evocation of wartime New York and some fantastic set piece scenes. It's more linear and careful than 'A Visit From The Goon Squad' - if that novel was 'Pulp Fiction' this one is 'Jackie Brown' but highly recommended.

  • Missing Out

  • In Praise of the Unlived Life
  • By: Adam Phillips
  • Narrated by: Simon Shepherd
  • Length: 5 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11

We all have two lives - the life we live and the life of our fantasies. But it is the life unlived - the person we have failed to be - that can trouble and even haunt us. In Missing Out acclaimed psychoanalyst Adam Phillips delves into the gap between who we are and who we are not, to discover whether not getting what we want may be the unlikely key to the fully lived life. Adam Phillips is a psychoanalyst and the author of several previous books, all widely acclaimed.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyed but not really understood

  • By clive on 13-09-17

Enjoyed but not really understood

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-09-17

Listening to this was like trying to climb up a slippery pole. One second's inattention and I was at the bottom again. There were moments when I think I might have got to the top and the view was lovely but generally I let it wash over me. Ironic really as the first chapter is about the frustrations and hidden pleasures of 'not getting it'. What I could understand was thought provoking and very intelligent. I should have known as I've got one of his books and never got past page 10. Don't let me put you off but if you haven't got some understanding of psychoanalysis be prepared to get pleasantly lost.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Room of His Own

  • A Literary-Cultural Study of Victorian Clubland
  • By: Barbara Black
  • Narrated by: Leonard Nelson
  • Length: 10 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 2

A Room of His Own sheds light on the mysterious ways of male associational culture as it examines such topics as fraternity, sophistication, nostalgia, social capital, celebrity, gossip, and male professionalism. The story of clubland (and the literature it generated) begins with Britain's military heroes home from the Napoleonic campaign and quickly turns to Dickens's and Thackeray's acrimonious Garrick Club Affair.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting scholarly study

  • By clive on 08-09-17

Interesting scholarly study

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-09-17

I really like Victorian novels, particularly Trollope and especially the parts set in Clubs. This book is a really interesting study of the nature and attraction of clubs and the intersection between clubs, literature and society in Victorian London. It's quite dense and scholarly and has a small target audience but I really enjoyed it. I have an English degree and it took me right back.

  • Some Luck

  • Last Hundred Years Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Jane Smiley
  • Narrated by: Lorelei King
  • Length: 14 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41

1920: After his return from the battlefields in France, Walter Langdon and his wife Rosanna begin their life together on a remote farm in Iowa. As time passes, their little family will grow: from Frank, the handsome, willful first-born, to Joe, whose love of animals and the land sustains him; from Lillian, beloved by her mother, to Henry who craves only the world of his books; and Claire, the surprise baby, who earns a special place in her father's heart.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A really pleasant listen

  • By Mikey on 13-11-14

Another great listen from Jane Smiley

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-06-17

I've been putting off starting this trilogy. I thought it might be a bit too long, a bit linear, maybe a bit slow. I was wrong. It's a page turner and immerses you in a family story told by multiple characters. A remarkable feat of story telling. I can't wait to listen to book 2.

  • Birds Art Life Death

  • A Field Guide to the Small and Significant
  • By: Kyo Maclear
  • Narrated by: Laurel Lefkow
  • Length: 4 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 17

In 2012 Kyo Maclear met a musician with a passion for birds. Curious about what had prompted a young urban artist to suddenly embrace nature, she decided to follow him for a year to find out.

Observing two artists through seasonal shifts and migrations, Birds Art Life Death celebrates the particular madness of chasing after birds in a big city and explores what happens when the principles of birdwatching are applied to other aspects of art and life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply beautiful

  • By Shakaroo on 09-07-18

Insubstantial but enjoyable

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-17

I'm on a bit of a run of these kind of books. My favorites so far are 'H is for Hawk' and 'Hidden Nature'. I'd recommend either ahead of this which for me seemed a bit insubstantial and self absorbed at times. I did enjoy it though - particularly her thoughts on small works of art.

  • Hidden Nature

  • A Voyage of Discovery
  • By: Alys Fowler
  • Narrated by: Miranda Cook
  • Length: 7 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 29
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 30

Leaving her garden to the mercy of the slugs, award-winning writer Alys Fowler set out in an inflatable kayak to explore Birmingham's canal network, full of little-used waterways where huge pike skulk and kingfishers dart. Her book is about noticing the wild everywhere and what it means to see beauty where you least expect it. What happens when someone who has learned to observe her external world in such detail decides to examine her internal world with the same care?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A small beautiful journey of discovery

  • By clive on 19-04-17

A small beautiful journey of discovery

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-04-17

An honest book about a difficult decision. It's a memoir about coming out, about making difficult decisions and hurting people without meaning to and about finding joy in the scrappy edges of nature down on the canals of Birmingham. That makes it sound odd but it's really good and makes you appreciate look things you'd never noticed . After I'd read it I went out and bought a gardening book and one about wild flowers - it's that kind of book

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Path to Power

  • The Years of Lyndon Johnson
  • By: Robert A. Caro
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 40 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 94

This is the story of the rise to national power of a desperately poor young man from the Texas Hill Country. The Path to Power reveals in extraordinary detail the genesis of the almost superhuman drive, energy, and ambition that set LBJ apart. It follows him from the Hill Country to New Deal Washington, from his boyhood through the years of the Depression to his debut as Congressman, his heartbreaking defeat in his first race for the Senate, and his attainment, nonetheless, at age 31, of the national power for which he hungered.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Compelling story of a complex man

  • By PauseToThink on 14-10-15

Mesmerizing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-17

The first volume of the greatest political biography (and social history) I've ever read. Like LBJ himself Caro takes care of every detail and does absolutely everything to bring us the most compelling portrait of this frantically ambitious, ruthless man. Hard to listen to and mesmerizing at the same time. Highly recommended.

  • Heartburn

  • By: Nora Ephron
  • Narrated by: Meryl Streep
  • Length: 5 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 416
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 373
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 367

Is it possible to write a sidesplitting novel about the breakup of the perfect marriage? If the writer is Nora Ephron, the answer is a resounding yes. For in this inspired confection of adultery, revenge, group therapy, and pot roast, the creator of Sleepless in Seattle reminds us that comedy depends on anguish as surely as a proper gravy depends on flour and butter.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So great!! I don't want it to end!

  • By Heather on 05-09-13

Sparkling

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-01-17

There's a bit in Steel Magnolias where Dolly Parton says 'laughter through tears is my favorite emotion'. If you agree this is your book. Let's all give thanks for Nora Ephron. And Meryl Streep. Enjoy.

  • The Essex Serpent

  • By: Sarah Perry
  • Narrated by: Juanita McMahon
  • Length: 14 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 912
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 846
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 847

London 1893: When Cora Seaborne and her son Francis reach Essex, rumours spread from further up the estuary that the mythical Essex Serpent, once said to roam the marshes claiming lives, has returned to the coastal parish of Aldwinter. Cora, a keen amateur naturalist is enthralled, convinced that it may be a previously undiscovered species. As she sets out on its trail she meets William Ransome, Aldwinter's vicar.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Authentic Voice

  • By Christina on 20-09-16

Beautifully written and not at all grim

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-10-16

A great novel. I was expecting worthy but a bit grim but actually it was beautifully written and life affirming. Highly recommended.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Maisky Diaries

  • Red Ambassador to the Court of St James's, 1932-1943
  • By: Gabriel Gorodetsky
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 24 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23

The terror and purges of Stalin's Russia in the 1930s discouraged Soviet officials from leaving documentary records, let alone keeping personal diaries. A remarkable exception is the unique diary assiduously kept by Ivan Maisky, the Soviet ambassador to London between 1932 and 1943. This selection from Maisky's diary grippingly documents Britain's drift to war during the 1930s, appeasement in the Munich era, negotiations leading to the signature of the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By Lord Peridot on 25-06-17

A fascinating new perspective

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-16

Fascinating, detailed and beautifully written. A fresh perspective which made me rethink my ingrained view of Britain's role in WW2. Reading this you experience something of how the war felt in real time, before it settled into history. Would make a brilliant accompaniment to William Manchester's biography of Churchill - also on audible.