LISTENER

Hello

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 11
  • helpful votes
  • 6
  • ratings

Marred by over-fast narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-11-19

I was looking forward to this, but I'm sorry to say that I'm having trouble finishing it, for one reason: the performer goes through the text at such a rapid clip that it's quite tiring to listen to. You don't get time to absorb the story, or to get a sense of atmosphere; you just feel rushed. It's quite disappointing; I'd like to know what happens, but every time I think of listening to it again, I just don't feel like it.

5 people found this helpful

Good book, terrible narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-12-17

Is there anything you would change about this book?

It’s very disappointing that the ever-excellent prose of Emma Donoghue was given to a reader who can’t do an Irish accent. For a recording of a book set in Ireland. In which every character but one is Irish.

Lock wouldn’t be a bad reader if she was reading a book set in England, but she’s a terrible choice for The Wonder: her fluting faith-and-begorra voices make every Irish character sound like leprechauns, not people, which kills the book. I’m actually returning this, it’s so bad.

Sorry, Ms Lock, I’m sure you’ll be fine if you stick to books that don’t demand accents beyind your range. But if the publishers are reading this: please do another version. Irish actresses who learned to speak RP English are not hard to come by, and that’s what you need. I would like to listen to this book, but this recording is unlistenable.

The perfect performance of an amazing book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-01-17

What made the experience of listening to Moby Dick the most enjoyable?

Moby-Dick is the wildest, weirdest wonderful book; reading or listening to it is really a life experience. William Hootkins does a terrific job with this: he has a lovely, sonorous voice with the kind of classic accent and diction that perfectly suits the material, and he's able to convey both the grandeur and the humour of Melville's veering tone. I think I'm going to find it hard not to hear the book in Hootkins's voice from now on - which is a positive thing, because he gets it so right. Really good!

Nicely performed, terribly edited

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-05-15

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Emily Dickinson's poems have no titles, and they range over a wide span of thoughts, often making surprising leaps from verse to verse. That's what's wonderful about them: they're both meditative and unpredictable.

The problem with this recording is that they don't announce the poems - which they could do by number - and it's mixed so that one follows immediately on another. Result: it's very easy to get lost and be unclear on which poem is which. There's no announcement or pause to separate them: they all run together, and unless you happen to already know them all (all 1800-odd of them), it's actually pretty hard to be sure when one poem ends and the next begins.

This is just poor judgement on a technical issue, but they really should have broken them up somehow. As it is I hardly listen to this because it's just too confusing.

5 people found this helpful

Very attractive reading

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-14

What made the experience of listening to Pride and Prejudice the most enjoyable?

I'm a devotee of Juliet Stevenson's Austen readings and was disappointed she hadn't done Pride and Prejudice, until I came across this version. Duncan's voice is pleasant and measured throughout and she strikes an excellent balance between performing the characters and obtrusively 'doing the voices'. Austen is harder to read that she sounds, but Duncan's performance is effortless and lovely to listen to.