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Fibri

Belgium
  • 14
  • reviews
  • 14
  • helpful votes
  • 99
  • ratings
  • Good Girls Don't Die

  • By: Isabelle Grey
  • Narrated by: Melody Grove
  • Length: 12 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 933
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 856
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 850

Accused of grassing up a fellow officer and driven brutally out of home and job, DI Grace Fisher is thankful to survive some dark times and find haven with the Major Investigation Team in Essex. Any hopes of a quiet start to her new life are dashed by the discovery of the body of a female student, last seen at a popular bar in Colchester. Grace has her first case. When a second student, also out drinking, is murdered and left grotesquely posed, the case becomes headline news. Someone is leaking disturbing details to a tabloid crime reporter. Is it the killer? Or a detective close to the case?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By Victoria Burton on 17-01-15

Formulaic and rather tedious

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-08-16

I listened to the end, so it wasn't the worst, but I didn't enjoy it. I found the story rather clichéed - writing by numbers, if you'll pardon the cliché - and figured out the solution very early on. I won't be buying the sequels.

  • The Paying Guests

  • By: Sarah Waters
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 21 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,043
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 969
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 966

Frances had been picturing her lodgers in purely mercenary terms - as something like two great waddling shillings. But this, she thought, was what it really meant to have paying guests: this odd, unintimate proximity, this rather peeled-back moment, where the only thing between herself and a naked Mrs Barber was a few feet of kitchen and a thin scullery door. An image sprang into her head: that round flesh, crimsoning in the heat.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Stressful............

  • By Karen on 04-09-14

Disappointed - slow and boring

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-15

I've loved several of Sarah Waters' novels and I've been saving this as a special treat but I just couldn't get on with this one. It's oh so slow to get started and once the core of the story does start I had lost all will to continue. I gave up after 5 hours.... but it felt a lot longer. Sheer drudgery.
I do recommend that you try Fingersmith or The Little Stranger instead. I found those totally enthralling.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Last Summer

  • By: Judith Kinghorn
  • Narrated by: Jane Wymark
  • Length: 13 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 244
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 136
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 132

A sweeping debut, perfect for reading groups and fans of Kate Morton and Downton Abbey - a beautiful and haunting story of lost innocence and a powerful, enduring love.Clarissa is almost seventeen when the spell of her childhood is broken. It is 1914, the beginning of a blissful, golden summer - and the end of an era. Deyning Park is in its heyday, the large country house filled with the laughter and excitement of privileged youth preparing for a weekend party.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Last Summer, by Judith Kinghorn

  • By Mrs on 10-06-12

Gave up on this one

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-05-14

I've struggled to get even half way through this but I give up. I can't stand Clarissa. She is characterless, just doing what others get her to do without asserting herself. If it were a better book, her being a doormat might have been a theme and the author would have been using this to say something about the role/position of women at the time. But I didn't get any of that. I just saw weakness of character and lack of any depth. People worth writing about - in any period of history - have a vibrancy of character, even if they behave submissively. Maybe this one would work better as a film, where her stunning beauty would make her stand out as exceptional, albeit superficially. As for Tom, the object of her great love, I just don't get it. I've rarely read about a more boring, blank character.

It's a shame. There was possibly a good book in there somewhere. A better editor might have been able to draw it out.

The reading was the best of it, but not enough to make me want to continue.

  • Mud, Muck and Dead Things

  • By: Ann Granger
  • Narrated by: Judith Boyd
  • Length: 9 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 125
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 80
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 79

A Campbell and Cater mystery. Crime in the Cotswolds just got deadly. When Lucas Burton arrives at a deserted farm, hoping to conduct a business deal, he stumbles across the body of a girl. And that's just the start of his problems. Penny Gower, from the local stables, spots his car leaving the crime scene, and when her friend Andrew Ferris calls the police it's only a matter of time before Lucas gets a visit from someone he'd rather not see...

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • disappointing

  • By Shipp on 12-10-12

Rather dull

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-14

I loved Ann Granger's Fran Varady series. Tried a few Mitchell and Markby, didn't like them much so I tried this. Didn't do it for me either. It's a very ordinary, humourless classic British police procedural. I couldn't really manage to care much about any of the characters, or what happened to whom or when... which sort of defeats the purpose of reading this type of fiction. Very flat characters and a rather unlikely plot. I won't be bothering with more of these.
But if you haven't read Gtranger's Fran Varady series, try that. It has an engaging, quirky protagonist and plenty of humour.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Twins

  • By: Tessa De Loo
  • Narrated by: Edwina Wren
  • Length: 15 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 4

Originally published in the Netherlands in 1993, De Loo's first novel to be translated into English explores the enmity that existed between Germans and the rest of Europe after World War II. This moving tale addresses notions of guilt and responsibility in a sensitive, thought-provoking manner, without exonerating or condemning.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • A worthy subject but terribly dull in the telling

  • By Fibri on 11-03-14

A worthy subject but terribly dull in the telling

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-03-14

Don't judge the book just by this review because I gave up less than half way through.

First, the narration. It's narration is irritating. Everyone is read with a very poor version of a German accent. Even the Dutch characters have German accents, which makes no sense (The Dutch accent speaking English is totally different to a German accent.) Why it had to be done with accents at all is a mystery to me.

The story should have been fascinating ... WWII from the perspectives of twins raised separately in Germany and Holland - what a great premise! But I failed to engage with or sympathise with either main character, and kept getting lost and confused in the story. I don't like writing bad reviews (the author and narrator have worked hard on this), but hey, that's the value of reviews - they have to be honest and helpful. I was bored, bored, bored.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • City of Women

  • By: David R. Gillham
  • Narrated by: Suzanne Bertish
  • Length: 13 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 54
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 48

It is 1943 - the height of the Second World War. With the men taken by the army, Berlin has become a city of women. And while her husband fights on the Eastern Front, Sigrid Schröder is, for all intents and purposes, the model soldier's wife: She goes to work every day, does as much with her rations as she can, and dutifully cares for her meddling mother-in-law, all the while ignoring the horrific immoralities of the regime. But behind this façade is an entirely different Sigrid, a woman who dreams of her former Jewish lover.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My favourite listen of 2013

  • By Fibri on 10-12-13

My favourite listen of 2013

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-13

I bought this on impulse without much research (I'm wary of debut novels usually)... and what a find it turned out to be. This had me glued to my seat throughout.

Beautifully narrated, it is a moving and compelling story of - mostly - women in Berlin during WWII. The story revolves mainly around women helping Jews escape capture by the Gestapo. The range of characters includes nazis, resistance heros and heroines, soldiers and ordinary women - and various mixtures thereof. It puts you face to face with moral complexity and ethical dilemmas. It's a moving love story and an even more moving story of an unlikely friendship. It is all shades of grey; no black and white, no right and wrong. Good guys behaving badly and bad guys behaving heroically. Fallible individuals facing extreme situations in different ways.

It's well written, psychologically insightful and atmospheric. I can't wait to see if David Gillham has further novels in the pipeline.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Death at the President's Lodging cover art
  • Death at the President's Lodging

  • An Inspector Appleby Mystery
  • By: Michael Innes
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hogan
  • Length: 9 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 89
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 32

Inspector Appleby is called to St Anthony's College, where the president has been murdered in his lodging. Scandal abounds when it becomes clear that the only people with any motive to murder him are the only people who had the opportunity - because the President's Lodging opens off Orchard Ground, which is locked at night, and only the Fellows of the College have keys.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More from this author, please

  • By John on 07-07-10

Disappointing and dull

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-07-13

I've been working my way through a load of Agatha Christie's novels recently (again....) and enjoying each and every one. So I thought I'd try something different from one of the classics, and picked out Innes largely based on the great reviews here. But I was very disappointed in this one.

I found it plodding, tedious and insular. Soon I was mixing up the different characters (none of them stood out in any memorable way) and losing track of the plot (I think I may have dozed off while listening once or twice) and by half way through the second part none of it was making any sense anymore. I struggled to get to the end - and then wondered why I'd bothered. I won't be reading more of Innes' books. What I will be reading is more from Edmund Crispin. Check out Glimpses of the Moon. This was another classic I also tried and it was a delight from start to finish.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • In the Company of the Courtesan

  • By: Sarah Dunant
  • Narrated by: Daniel Philpott
  • Length: 14 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29

The year is 1527. While the Papal city of Rome burns, two of her most interesting and wily citizens slip away. Though almost as damaged as their beloved city, Fiammetta Bianchini and Bucino Teodoldi, a fabulous courtesan and her dwarf companion, are already planning their future. They head for the shimmering beauty of Venice, a honey pot of wealth and trade where they start to rebuild their business. As a partnership they are invincible. Venice, however, is a city that holds its own temptations.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very enjoyable plunge into 16th C Venice

  • By Fibri on 31-07-13

Very enjoyable plunge into 16th C Venice

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-07-13

This is a very enjoyable listen. The characters and places come to life as if you were there with them. My only complaint is that the story dragged a bit towards the middle but then it picked up again. I enjoyed Sacred Hearts more, as the convent environment and the insights into the roles of women in convents vs the outside world was fascinating. This one is still an enjoyable historical tale but since it is a more intimate story about one courtesan and her close friend/business partner, you don't get quite the same feeling of insight into society.

Dunant writes well and intelligently, and with obvious authority regarding the historical details. The reading is excellent too.

I have also bought Blood and Beauty and I'm looking forward to reading it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The First Days

  • As the World Dies, Book 1
  • By: Rhiannon Frater
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 11 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 84
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 48

The morning that the world ends, Katie is getting ready for court and housewife Jenni is taking care of her family. Less than two hours later, they are fleeing for their lives from a zombie horde. Thrown together by circumstance, Jenni and Katie become a powerful zombie-killing partnership, mowing down zombies as they rescue Jenni's stepson, Jason, from an infected campground.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-01-12

Fantastic trilogy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-04-13

From the opening lines, this novel had me hooked. It haunts me still. I listened to this book about a year ago, and have read many zombie novels since. This one (and the two more in the trilogy) remain my favourites. World War Z has - justifiably - the reputation of being the best zombie novel, but this trilogy isn't far behind. It has engaging, powerful characters, a good storyline, and an excellent balance of character-driven and action-driven interest. I strongly recommend it if you're a zombie fan. If you're not - yet - start with World War Z. And the reading is excellent.

  • An Accomplished Woman

  • By: Jude Morgan
  • Narrated by: Phyllida Nash
  • Length: 14 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25

1817. As a young woman, clever, self-reliant Lydia Templeton scandalised society by rejecting Lewis Durrant, the county's most eligible batchelor.

Ten years later, Lydia has no regrets and, having concluded that matters of the heart need no longer trouble her, she is quite happy to remain unwed. But others still seek Lydia's advice on their love lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An Accomplished Woman

  • By Marie-Clare on 24-04-11

A good listen but not as good as A Little Folly

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-13

This was an entertaining listen but I enjoyed it less than A Little Folly. I'd recommend that instead. An Accomplished Woman had a good story, good characterisation, but it was just a little slow.