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Dean

High Halden, United Kingdom
  • 11
  • reviews
  • 4
  • helpful votes
  • 261
  • ratings
  • Dungeon Born

  • Divine Dungeon Series, Book 1
  • By: Dakota Krout
  • Narrated by: Vikas Adam
  • Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 468
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 446
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 444

For eons, conquering dungeons has been the most efficient way to become a strong adventurer. Although not everything is as straightforward as it seems. Several questions have always plagued the minds of those who enter these mythical places of power: why are there so many monsters? Where do the amazing weaponry and heavy gold coins come from? Why does the very air fill with life-giving energies? Cal has all of the answers to these age-old questions, for a very simple reason. He is a Dungeon Heart.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • loved it

  • By Dan Wright on 05-05-17

Just awful.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-01-19

The narrator was perfect for this book; he was awful too.

There might have been a germ of creativity in the original concept, but it has been buried under a big heap of cliché, smaltz and padding.

And the narrator couldn't have over-identified with the text more if he'd been the author.

Couldn't finish it, so no danger of spoilers.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Darkly Dreaming Dexter

  • Dexter Book 1
  • By: Jeff Lindsay
  • Narrated by: Jeff Lindsay
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 498
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 477
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 474

Dexter Morgan isn't exactly the kind of man you'd bring home to your mum. At heart he's the perfect gentleman: He has a shy girlfriend and seems to lead a quiet, normal life bordering on the mundane. Despite the fact that he can't stand the sight of blood, he works as a blood-spatter analyst for the Miami police. But Dexter also has a secret hobby: He is an accomplished serial killer. So far he's killed 36 people and has never been caught because he knows exactly how to hide the evidence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Delicious Downloaded Dexter

  • By Norma Miles on 22-07-15

Authors shouldn't narrate their own work.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-06-18

It's one thing to be proud if your work, but it's another thing entirely to demonstrate how proud you are. This guy's ego gets between his work and his audience.

  • Will Save the Galaxy for Food

  • By: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Narrated by: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,464
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,309
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,307

Space travel just isn't what it used to be. With the invention of Quantum Teleportation, space heroes aren't needed anymore. When one particularly unlucky ex-adventurer masquerades as famous pilot and hate figure Jacques McKeown, he's sucked into an ever-deepening corporate and political intrigue. Between space pirates, adorable deadly creatures, and a missing fortune in royalties, saving the universe was never this difficult!

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Stumbled across this 'plying' beauty

  • By M.Brad on 11-04-17

Inexplicable pronunciation

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-18

Unapologetic pulp fiction, which moves along well enough. However, the narrator pronounces several words oddly, for example, cush in cushion is rhymed with mush as in mushroom. Unfortunately cushion & cushioning are common in the text.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Provenance

  • By: Ann Leckie
  • Narrated by: Adjoa Andoh
  • Length: 12 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 213
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 201
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 201

A power-driven young woman has just one chance to secure the status she craves and regain priceless lost artefacts prized by her people. She must free their thief from a prison planet from which no one has ever returned. Ingray and her charge will return to their home world to find their planet in political turmoil, at the heart of an escalating interstellar conflict. Together they must make a new plan to salvage Ingray's future, her family and her world before they are lost to her for good.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ann Leckie has done it again. Another great story

  • By Kindle Customer on 03-10-17

A complex, nuanced vision.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-10-17

The author's subtle humour is delivered by this accomplished narrator with a deadpan style and a twinkle in her voice.
Initially, I worried the various different pronouns were likely to get tiresome, but it never happened, the story took over and I spent more time listening to the dialogue for the humour. You do have to listen for it, it is never signalled.
While it will be described by some as politically correct and even a feminist novel, these labels are irrelevant to what is a sci-fi novel of political intrigue and a range of characters displaying a great deal of panache.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Closed and Common Orbit

  • Wayfarers, Book 2
  • By: Becky Chambers
  • Narrated by: Patricia Rodriguez
  • Length: 13 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 580
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 534
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 532

Lovelace was once merely a ship's artificial intelligence. When she wakes up in an new body following a total system shutdown and reboot, she has to start over in a synthetic body, in a world where her kind are illegal. She's never felt so alone. But she's not alone, not really. Pepper, one of the engineers who risked life and limb to reinstall Lovelace, is determined to help her adjust to her new world. Because Pepper knows a thing or two about starting over.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful story wonderfully read!

  • By Dario Persechino on 24-12-16

Not suitable for adults

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-10-16

Pre-ordered so felt obliged to listen, hated the word real by the end. Sloppy writing.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Hospital: The FREE Short Story: The First Mountain man Story

  • By: Keith C. Blackmore
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 1 hr and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,738
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,533
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,539

"Mountain Man" Augustus Berry is a survivor in undead suburbia. He scavenges what he can from what's left over. He is very careful in what he does and where he goes, taking no chances, no unnecessary risks, and weighing every choice... until he decides to visit the hospital at the edge of town, and experiences terror the likes he's never encountered before. A short story of approximately 9500 words. The first story of the "Mountain Man" series. Contains language and graphic violence. If you enjoy this, check out the rest of the series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lovely freebie!

  • By NC on 08-04-14

Torture porn

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-04-15

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

A storyline

Has The Hospital: The FREE Short Story: The First Mountain man Story put you off other books in this genre?

Wouldn't touch this author, series or narrator (by association) with a bargepole.

How could the performance have been better?

Some shred of story or concept to hang my willing suspension of disbelief on. Some class would help.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Revulsion

Any additional comments?

This is such low grade entertainment that I am considering whether Audible is worth the subscription.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Baby's Coming

  • A Story of Dedication by an Independent Midwife
  • By: Virginia Howes
  • Narrated by: Julie Maisey
  • Length: 10 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33

Virginia Howes was a mother of four doing the ironing when she had a revelation. Still broody, but not really wanting to add to her family, she realised that becoming a midwife was her true vocation. It was a long journey to get the education and qualifications she needed, especially with a young family, but she was determined and never doubted her decision. Following her training, she spent three years working within the NHS, but her naturally independent spirit fought against the constraints of the system and 12 years ago she decided to set up on her own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I wish I had know then ....

  • By jane joensen on 26-10-14

Catalogue of self-aggrandising nonsense

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-02-15

Supposedly a guide for self employed midwives this emotionally incontinent autobiography contains a sparse smattering of technical information much of which is misleading, some of which is positively dangerous.

  • The Girl with No Name

  • By: Marina Chapman
  • Narrated by: Pam Ward
  • Length: 9 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 74
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 56
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 56

In 1954, in a remote South American village, a four-year-old girl was abducted and then abandoned deep in the Colombian rainforest. So begins the incredible true story of Marina Chapman, who went on to spend several years alone in the jungle, her only family a troop of capuchin monkeys. Using instinct to guide her, she copied everything they did and soon learned to fend for herself. At around 10 years old, a completely feral Marina was returned to civilisation by hunters, who sold her as a slave to a brothel. Beaten daily and groomed to be a prostitute, she escaped - to live the perilous existence of a Colombian city street kid.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • girl with no name

  • By Mr. John Harris on 22-05-13

Melodrama doesn't work for me.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-13

If this book wasn’t for you, who do you think might enjoy it more?

If you like dramatic and inspirational tales of children overcoming hardships this story will float your boat.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

I am fascinated by stories of feral children. An amazing array of animals have been credited with the adoptive instincts to raise a human child including wolves, bears, apes, monkeys and even ostriches.
Many of the so-called feral children of history were possibly autistic and the 'raised by animals' angle is an imaginative attempt to create a back story to explain their lack of social graces, recognisable language and sense of human connection.

As an exercise in playing with the audience's uncertainty over whether this is fiction, autobiographical semi-fiction or reportage, this works very well.

The least interesting aspect of the book is the time in the jungle. A young child, living in one smallish area, with a resident troupe of monkeys, with plenty to eat all year round is implausible at best.

What aspect of Pam Ward’s performance might you have changed?

The clipped pronunciation and declining tone at the end of almost sentence exacerbates the melodrama and produces an emotional overload. More performance than was really needed, made the book tiring listening.

What character would you cut from The Girl with No Name?

The fictional characters - unfortunately that is probably most of them.

Any additional comments?

To the best of my knowledge, although I'm still looking, there are no verified cases of children raised by animals in the wild. In zoology and biology cases of cross-species adoption are surpassing rare outside of domesticated animals in an artificial context.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Whispers Under Ground

  • Rivers of London, Book 3
  • By: Ben Aaronovitch
  • Narrated by: Kobna Holdbrook-Smith
  • Length: 10 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,367
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,730
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,711

Peter Grant is learning magic fast. And it’s just as well - he's already had run-ins with the deadly supernatural children of the Thames and a terrifying killer in Soho. Progression in the police force is less easy, especially when you work in a department of two. A department that doesn't even officially exist. A department that if you did describe it to most people would get you laughed at.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful story, wonderful narration

  • By Jane on 04-07-12

A wonderful, experience.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-07-12

No other combination of writer & narrator gives me quite so much of a thrill of anticipation as this one. The black humour of policemen, the obsession with health, safety and political correctness and the London banter are all very British and very funny. The jokes are not so continuous that these novels are mere comedy, there are elements of fantasy mixed with police procedure and a genuine affection for the city and its multi-layered history.

  • The Long Earth

  • By: Terry Pratchett, Stephen Baxter
  • Narrated by: Michael Fenton Stevens
  • Length: 11 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,968
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,635
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,639

The Western Front, 1916. Private Percy Blakeney wakes up. He is lying on fresh spring grass. He can hear birdsong, and the wind in the leaves in the trees. Where have the mud, blood, and blasted landscape of No Man's Land gone? Madison, Wisconsin, 2015. Cop Monica Jansson is exploring the burned-out home of a reclusive - some said mad, others dangerous - scientist when she finds a curious gadget: a box containing some wiring, a three-way switch and a potato. It is the prototype of a life-changing invention....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Engrossing.

  • By Martin on 10-03-13

Clang! The sound of a dropped baton.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-12

With all of humanity, infinite new habitable worlds and few technical limitations Baxter and Pratchett had the ultimate storyboard within their grasp, all that was left to do was light the blue touchpaper, cue the music and pass on the baton. And so it all begins with Joshua...
Except that Joshua is easily the dullest central character since Wally was found. There is more depth and differentiation in a string of paper dollies than in the rest of the cast put together. The plot gets lost as soon as it is revealed and the drama is scattered across a number unconnected events. Oh, and there is a very clumsy cliffhanger. Cue the tumbleweed.