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Je suis Charlie

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iunno I think it's pretty gay.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-03-19

iunno I think it's pretty gay.

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Great book, but don't read this version.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-03-19

Great book, but don't read this version unless you want to help fund the government propaganda machine that is the BBC.

1 person found this helpful

Yet another

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-02-19

Yet another author that can't help shoving their lefty politics into their writing. Perhaps I'm being too harsh, but I'm just so sick of the mainstream narrative, and most authors throughout history are left leaning compared to the general population. I suppose right leaning people prefer to own a book shop :) At this point I'm getting pretty desperate to make a start on Robert A. Heinleins books just to read something from somebody with a different perspective on things. Apart from that it's a very good and interesting book, written about the weird and wonderful by someone with a skeptical perspective. It did contain the best argument I have ever heard in favor of left wing politics: "A reasonable man will change themselves to suit the world, whereas an unreasonable man will change the world to suit themselves. So progress depends upon unreasonable men." It seems to me that the political left are certainly unreasonable, and becoming more and more so in recent years. It never occurred to me that the very thing that frustrates me about the left is actually a necessary evil. So the political left is evil, but necessary. But the left needs the right to hold it in check. I think I heard a similar argument before now that I think about it. An analogy where civilization is an airplane. The left is the thrust, and the right is the wings, keeping it up in the air, keeping it from crashing. Without the thrust of the left, no progress is made. Without the stabilizing wings of the right, you will crash and burn.

Peace✌🏻

Attack of the THOTS

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-02-19

We see the return of a theme that was central to the first book in the series.
There is a certain kind of woman which in modern parlance is not too politely referred to as a THOT.

This is a woman who has learned to take the wealth of men not by having sex with them, but by not having sex with them. Once a man gets what he wanted he often does lose interest, but if you can dangle the carrot (or should that be the cherry?) without ever giving it to him, you can take him for everything he has. Women that learn this art make far more money than prostitutes and porn stars. It is arguable that they are the female version of a womanizer. A womanizer being a man who uses his wealth and power to exploit women's bodies. A THOT is a woman who uses her body to exploit men for wealth and power. In both cases they are people who one cannot have a meaningful relationship with, since they are not interested in partnership, but in exploitation.

Although some women in modern times still play this game, if Marcel Proust is to be believed, the THOTs of olden times where on a whole other level. These women were intelligent, manipulative, and very, very, dangerous.

In encouraging women to be more like men, feminism has, I think, to some extent, de-fanged the female sex, by encouraging women to play to their weaknesses, rather than their strengths.

I actually have some admiration for these women. Possessed of "Dragon Energy", they are invariably very intelligent (but often quite good at hiding it), and I have sympathy, as in many cases it has been a way out of poverty for them, or, having been exploited by men in the past, they have learned to turn the tables in their favor. Men should avoid such women like the plague.

✌🏻Peace.

Would you like to know more?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02QTsHvYKHs

Difficult book to recommend

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-12-18

I think this would be impossible to recommend to anybody who is not interested in philosophy or French history or culture, or reading books simply because they are regarded as classics. The unusual writing style might be of interest to aspiring authors, or those studying literature, but that's about it. It's a very difficult book to recommend on it's own merits.

My opinion might change

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-09-18

My opinion might change after I have read the whole series, but at the moment I am not sure what all the fuss is about. This book is famous for not being read, and also for being recommended by teachers to their students, who almost invariably do not read it. Which is hardly surprising since all volumes in the series combined produce a mammoth text.

There are interesting things about it. The author uses a stream of consciousness style, which is quite unusual. What is also unusual is the way he seems to insert himself into a story that must at least in part be pure fiction, and you do very much feel that he is writing about himself, since the authors stream of consciousness often carries him to the innermost thoughts of other people, the narrative flowing seamlessly from one characters stream of consciousness to another's. This created a dreamlike effect.

Unfortunately it is a rather boring dream. However, the book does serve as a window. People writing in their own time and place have created time capsules, time machines, that let you visit a different mind. Other than that there does not seem to be much reason to recommend this book to anybody.

Mixed feelings about this.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-18

On one level this is the story of a mean old man that talked an impressionable young one into murdering his own family. The guru worship that causes so much suffering in eastern religion is clearly baked in to this text, it is quite central to it, and it pushes the supposed virtues of this ancient version of celebrity culture hard. Hare Krishna comes across as a sinister Rasputin, a grand vizier, egging the young prince on to war. That being said there is also a good deal of wisdom in here I think, and I like that it offers a path of spiritual practice that does not involve complete renunciation or asceticism, much like the "middle way" of the Buddha, neither completely renouncing materialism, or completely giving in to it. It takes a negative view of abandoning your family and responsibilities in the selfish pursuit personal spiritual fulfilment, which I think is reasonable. It contains the sentence "You have the right to work, but not to the fruits of your work." I think I can see the point it's trying to make. There is a kind of mindfulness that comes from simply focusing on what one is doing rather than counting down the hours and minuets to the end of your shift, wanting only to be somewhere else and taking no joy in your work, simply being in it for the money. The problem with phrasing it as this book does, is that a farmer who literally renounces the fruits of his labour will surely starve, and I can see this phrasing being used to justify slavery, or worse, Communism.

This book also claims that an atheist cannot be a good person. If you are interested in hearing the counter argument to such a claim feel free to google "Hitchens", "Sam Harris" and "Richard Dawkins".

14 people found this helpful

God was pretty bad ass back in the day.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-04-18

If the "Horrible Histories" series ever did the bible this would be the end result. It's literally that. "Horrible Israelites" perhaps? No? OK then...

1 person found this helpful

Too much feminism.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-18

Because any amount of feminism is too much feminism. There are points when I feel like the author has merely exchanged one puritanical faith for another.

meh

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-18

page 222
"In general, the world would be a better place if people shared more truths and believed fewer falsehoods. That's why we have education and public-information campaigns and newspapers and so forth. There are exceptions—strategic secrets, for instance, cases where I believe something and am grateful that nobody else shares my belief."

page 202
"The physicist Paul Davies (2004) has recently defended the view that belief in free will is so important that it may be "a fiction worth maintaining." It is interesting that he doesn't seem to think that his own discovery of the awful truth (what he takes to be the awful truth) incapacitates him morally, but believes that others, more fragile than he, will need to be protected from it."