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Jonathan

LondonUnited Kingdom
  • 48
  • reviews
  • 163
  • helpful votes
  • 54
  • ratings
  • The Long Sunset

  • By: Jack McDevitt
  • Narrated by: Alyssa Bresnahan
  • Length: 13 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8

Priscilla “Hutch” Hutchins discovers an interstellar message from a highly advanced race that could be her last chance for a mission before the program is shut down for good. Hutch has been the academy’s best pilot for decades. She’s had numerous first contact encounters and even became a minor celebrity. But world politics have shifted from exploration to a growing fear that the program will run into an extraterrestrial race more advanced than humanity and war.  

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Grown up sci fi

  • By Jonathan on 18-02-19

Grown up sci fi

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-02-19

Compared to some sci fi's I've listened to recently this is slow and wonderful. Mcdevitt is a mature storyteller and puts more depth into his minor subplots than others have in their main plotline. But it helps if you've read the previous novels in the series to get the context. One difficulty is the characters which are not as cleanly defined as they could be, and tend to do rather stupid things. That's part of the 'world', with humanity dumbing down and spending much of their in entertainments, rather than knowledge, so its in keeping, but difficult none the less.

  • Unearthed

  • By: Amie Kaufman, Meagan Spooner
  • Narrated by: Steve West, Alex McKenna
  • Length: 12 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13

When Earth intercepts a message from a long-extinct alien race, it seems like the solution humanity has been waiting for. The Undying's advanced technology has the potential to undo environmental damage and turn lives around, and their message leads to the planet Gaia, a treasure trove waiting to be explored. For Jules Addison and his fellow scholars, the discovery of an ancient alien culture offers unprecedented opportunity for study...as long as scavengers like Amelia Radcliffe don't loot everything first.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • For younger teens only

  • By Jonathan on 07-02-19

For younger teens only

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-19

This is a rather embarrassing listen to anyone who's read sci fi or been around long enough to have seen a few movies, it's so naively plotted that you are left shaking your head. Two teens go to a alien world, survive hardship, out wit professional soldiers and mercenaries, break in to alien temples and solve tomb raider style puzzles. The cliffhanger ending made me cross as it literally finishes mid scene. The 'twists' might surprise some, but you'd have to have quite a limited reading experience. The story structure is incredibly simple, especially in the characters back stories and the story arc itself is poorly thought through, could have been written in the early fifties, as a children's space adventure, or as a script for a newspaper cartoon, were it not for the swearing. For younger teenagers perhaps this works, but anyone older is going to have to play it at a increased speed to get through it.

  • Quiller KGB

  • Quiller, Book 13
  • By: Adam Hall
  • Narrated by: Antony Ferguson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 4

Quiller is asked by London's Bureau to accept a mission with a completely new twist: To work with Russia's formidable and ruthless KGB. The Soviet Union's charismatic leader is headed for a diplomatic visit to East Berlin at a time when tensions surrounding the hated Berlin Wall are at their height. Quiller uncovers more than one conspiracy as he tries to stop a highly sophisticated assassin from killing Russia's General-Secretary.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just love old spy thrillers

  • By Jonathan on 26-11-18

Just love old spy thrillers

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-18

So beautifully written, tight and razor sharp, really wish modern authors could learn some of this precision.

  • The Mighty Boosh

  • The Complete Radio Series
  • By: Noel Fielding, Julian Barratt
  • Narrated by: Noel Fielding, Julian Barratt
  • Length: 3 hrs
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 423
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 283
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 281

The Mighty Boosh is unlike any show you are ever likely to hear, and one that defies description; the closest you could get to the unique style of Julian Barratt and Noel Fielding would be in the early days of Reeves and Mortimer, with their cardboard props and men with sticks.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful nonsense from my favourite duo

  • By Tanya K. on 14-03-18

Nothing better

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-18

Gives such pleasure, listened to this multiple times, ever time it's just so joyous and silly and light, like a ear marshmallow.

  • The Eyes of Darkness

  • By: Dean Koontz
  • Narrated by: Tanya Eby
  • Length: 9 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

A year had passed since little Danny's death - A year since his mother began the painful process of acceptance. But Tina Evans could have sworn she just saw her Danny in a stranger's car...Then she dreamed that Danny was alive. And when she awoke, she found a message waiting for her in Danny's bedroom - Two disturbing words scrawled on his chalkboard: NOT DEAD.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • loved it!

  • By munky on 22-09-16

Dated, ridiculous and predictable

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-18

Back in the early eighties this probably worked, in an early Stephen King way, (firestarter), but its barely listenable now, even though it's apparently been polished up by Koontz for reissue. The characters are impossibility fake, the dialogue dreadful. The narration doesn't help, brings no gravitas, just breathy cheap emoting.

  • Only Human

  • Themis Files, Book 3
  • By: Sylvain Neuvel
  • Narrated by: Sylvain Neuvel, William Hope, Charlie Anson, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 461
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 430
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 429

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of Only Human by Sylvain Neuvel, read by a returning cast. We always thought the biggest threat to humanity would come from the outside. We were wrong. As the human race picks up the pieces of destruction left behind, a new world order emerges. New alliances are formed. Old divisions are strengthened. And, with a power struggle fuelled by the threat of mutually assured destruction, nothing is certain.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing ending to an excellent series

  • By Mr on 01-06-18

Parts 1 & 2 are great, part 3 not so much

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-18

It's been a brilliant ride listening to this story, parts 1 & 2 are original and fresh and a real pleasure to listen to, excellent narration, engaging characters. Part 3 is a disappointment, mainly due to a shifting of focus to a minor teenage character who never seems real, behaves ridiculously and I'm sorry to say is narrated annoyingly. Takes the whole book into teen fiction territory that is really hard to get through, kind of wish I'd stopped at number 2.

  • Mogworld

  • By: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Narrated by: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Length: 13 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,580
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,436
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,430

In a world full to bursting with would-be heroes, Jim couldn't be less interested in saving the day. His fireballs fizzle. He's awfully grumpy. Plus, he's been dead for about 60 years. When a renegade necromancer wrenches him from eternal slumber and into a world gone terribly, bizarrely wrong, all Jim wants is to find a way to die properly, once and for all. On his side, he's got a few shambling corpses, an inept thief, and a powerful death wish. But he's up against tough odds....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic story and narration after first hour.

  • By Kieran on 17-11-12

Enjoyable romp

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-18

Shades of Pratchett in this story, light of heart yet with dark moments and a thoughtful subtext. Worthy of a credit.

  • Differently Morphous

  • By: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Narrated by: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Length: 10 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,422
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,338
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,337

A magical serial killer is on the loose, and gelatinous, otherworldly creatures are infesting the English countryside. Which is making life for the Ministry of Occultism difficult, because magic is supposed to be their best kept secret. After centuries in the shadows, the Ministry is forced to unmask, exposing the country's magical history - and magical citizens - to a brave new world of social media, government scrutiny, and public relations.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Half Supernatural thriller, half Yes Minister

  • By Anonymous User on 16-03-18

Easily the most fun I've had all year

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-09-18

Quirky and humorous, sarcastic and bitter look at our PC world through lovecraft/Rowling mash up.... Very enjoyable, could I have some more please?

  • The Aeronaut's Windlass

  • The Cinder Spires, Book One
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: Euan Morton
  • Length: 21 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 521
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 494
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 497

Since time immemorial, the Spires have sheltered humanity, towering for miles over the mist-shrouded surface of the world. Within their halls, aristocratic houses have ruled for generations, developing scientific marvels, fostering trade alliances, and building fleets of airships to keep the peace. Captain Grimm commands the merchant ship Predator. Fiercely loyal to Spire Albion, he has taken their side in the cold war with Spire Aurora, disrupting the enemy's shipping lines by attacking their cargo vessels.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fun

  • By Robyn on 08-06-16

Stick with it past the confusion of the first hour

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-17

This is complex new world building and absolutely no time is spent explaining the world's 'rules' or background, the reader is just thrown in the deep end. For the first hour I was just listening to random elements that I struggled to fit into a bigger picture. But once the story gets rolling it's a surprisingly simple one, dramatically told and easy to follow. It's just that the author doesn't want to spend time explaining the world to the reader, he wants you to get to know it through the events that take place. It's an enjoyable 'pirate romp', and I'll happily read the second one when it comes out. But there is a surprisingly unquestioning quality to the loyalty to the leader, and rigidity to the 'born into power, or born into service' philosophy that is increasingly uncomfortable to go along with from American writers in a Trumpian world. It's a militaristic society where the young from the well off families join the 'guard' and are trained to kill, and we're supposed to see them as heroic. We need to believe that our protagonists are the 'good guys' and although the story is clear in its black and white morality we surprisingly begin to doubt whether we are following the right people, and I really don't think that the author wanted that doubt. Looking for a bit more grey between the black and white next time. Listened at 1:20 speed which sounded right.

  • The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.

  • By: Neal Stephenson, Nicole Galland
  • Narrated by: Laurence Bouvard, Shelley Atkinson, Laural Merlington, and others
  • Length: 24 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 434
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 403
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 404

You think you know how the world works? Think again. From best-selling author Neal Stephenson and critically acclaimed historical and contemporary novelist Nicole Galland comes a captivating and complex near-future thriller that questions the very foundations of the modern world. Magic has faded from the minds of mankind, until an encounter between Melisande Stokes, linguistics expert at Harvard, and Tristan Lyons, shadowy agent of government, leads to the uncovering of a distant past.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • started good but got quite boring <br />

  • By gemma dawe on 17-07-17

Difficult to like when expectations were so high

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-17

Stephenson is a brilliant writer and I respect his intelligence, his last few books went straight into my top ten. But something is off here, and I'm going to summarise it into two points. 1: one of the writers must have read the 'chronicles of st Mary's' books but forgotten that fact, as some plot points are carried over wholesale, but handled here with less flair and humour and by using far more words. 2: this kind of American centred story is all very well but the non American characters are handled very badly by the story, abused, imprisoned, pushed into selling their bodies for the good of the American government.... Really uncomfortable to read something so quietly persistent in its jingoism - it must be a clever 'doubled back on itself' author idea, but it just made me really dislike the 'hero' as self serving and disrespectful of other cultures. The American protagonists are strangely vacuous, are we supposed to be engaged by their 'will they won't they' relationship? The ultimate oddness in the story is that the approach to time travel is so dangerous and blind to consequence that from the first you are just angry at the US government for allowing something to be run so stupidly that it's obviously going to go wrong. It's as if the book has been written as a warning to not terribly bright teens that time travel is surprisingly dangerous... No shinola sherlock.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful