LISTENER

weasal

Scotland
  • 8
  • reviews
  • 30
  • helpful votes
  • 36
  • ratings
  • Circe

  • By: Madeline Miller
  • Narrated by: Perdita Weeks
  • Length: 12 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 705
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 656
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 653

From the Orange Prize-winning, internationally best-selling author of The Song of Achilles comes the powerful story of the mythological witch Circe, inspired by Homer's Odyssey. In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe has neither the look nor the voice of divinity and is scorned and rejected by her kin. Increasingly isolated, she turns to mortals for companionship, leading her to discover a power forbidden to the gods: witchcraft.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By madeleine davitt on 06-05-18

Very well written but lacks in character strength

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-18

This is excellently written. The story flows beautifully and you learn so much of Greek mythology. I had however hoped to read of a strong, more feminist leaning Circe. Instead the author has her constantly controlled and dominated by males. In fact mostly all of Circe's thoughts are solely about obsessing over all the males that cross her path, whether it's her father, her lovers, and then her son. It was a bit tiresome and it would have been nice to see a different twist on the mythology.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • The Book of the Unnamed Midwife

  • The Road to Nowhere, Book 1
  • By: Meg Elison
  • Narrated by: Angela Dawe
  • Length: 9 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 74
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 74

When she fell asleep, the world was doomed. When she awoke, it was dead. In the wake of a fever that decimated the earth's population - killing women and children and making childbirth deadly for the mother and infant - the midwife must pick her way through the bones of the world she once knew to find her place in this dangerous new one. Gone are the pillars of civilization. All that remains is power - and the strong who possess it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Yessss

  • By vicki on 13-11-16

A lot of potential but ultimately fell a bit flat

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-18

Hmm, what to say about this one. As a big fan of post-apocalyptic fare, I'm always excited to see stories written by women, about women. There were lots of elements to this that had potential, but it just never seemed to come together as one captivating piece overall. The protagonist (unnamed as the title suggests) is fairly fleshed out in the beginning, but the writing style means I never felt fully connected to her. It jumps really quickly between her journal entries to then a narrator, and it just ends up being a bit jarring. It was also reeeeeally annoying, particularly with the audio version to hear her saying "something equals something equals something" over and over. If I had to hear that one more time I was going to turn it off! It would have been so much more engaging if the journal entries had been written out in proper long-form prose. I don't get why you wouldn't utilise that narrative tool to achieve that. I also groaned a lot at the whole section where she's living in unbliss in the Mormon triangle. To have a queer woman represented in a story like this was initially great, but then to have her queerness more or less erased by having her sleep with some completely lame religious zealot was disappointing and a little bizarre. Of all the things the author could have chosen to have her do in this difficult new world, she has her shack up with the two dullest people left on earth. I mean, why? I would have liked to have spent more time with her in the very last part, at Fort Nowhere. But that felt rushed and a little pointless, and we didn't get much more character development. All in all, I enjoyed parts of this but was basically left disappointed.

  • Commune

  • Commune, Book 1
  • By: Joshua Gayou
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 348
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 332
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 331

For dinosaurs, it was a big rock. For humans: Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). When the Earth is hit by the greatest CME in recorded history (several times larger than the Carrington Event of 1859), the combined societies of the planet's most developed nations struggle to adapt to a life thrust back into the Dark Ages. In the United States, the military scrambles to speed the nation's recovery on multiple fronts including putting down riots, establishing relief camps, delivering medical aid, and bringing communication and travel back on line. Just as a real foothold is established in retaking the skies (utilizing existing commercial aircraft supplemented by military resources and ground control systems), a mysterious virus takes hold of the population, spreading globally over the very flight routes that the survivors fought so hard to rebuild.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story. R C Bray awesome as always

  • By Matthew B. on 23-11-17

So confused why this book gets so much love

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-06-18

I've had to give up listening and I'm only at chapter 7. I was already fairly bored and unimpressed with the strange talking heads narration style. Why not just tell the story as it happened instead of reducing it to some kind of journal-entry blow by blow? From the get-go I was holding on to some fairly hefty side-eye towards the sole female character, Amanda. Did she really have to be a single mother, pregnant at 19 and widowed at twenty-something? It is so yawn-worthy to see this tired old trope of women always having to be mothers and wives when the men just get to be the infinitely capable, silent lone-wolf types with no familial responsibilities to burden them. Anyway, I was willing to overlook it and see how she evolved and where her story went. Well imagine my surprise (not) when only 7 chapters in we find her square in the middle of that old favourite, the post-apocalyptic gang rape fantasy. I mean seriously. Why do so many male storytellers feel the overwhelming desire to put their female characters through degrading and traumatic sexual violence in order for them to emerge as that "STRONG FEMALE CHARACTER" they can then have a wank over. Balls to that.. Pretty sure this little gem of a line is what really sealed the deal for me - "What he was describing (being raped every night for the rest of time by four men while your soon-to-be-at-risk-too daughter sleeps near by) didn't actually sound like the worst thing that could happen. Our culture has it all built up like rape is the absolute worst thing that could happen to a woman. But it's really not." Umm ok, pal. Thanks so much for the enlightenment! Listen up ladies! Rape's ok! No need to make a fuss about it. Just "roll over" and do your bit for mankind. They have needs you know. And listen, if you're lucky then a couple of 'nice guys' will come along and save you and you can feel like a regular damsel in distress. Then they can teach your pretty little head how to use guns and survive. Gee, what would you ever have done without all these men. So yeah...I'm out. There are far far better post-apoc stories out there with nuanced, well-rounded characters that also don't go on about bullet diameters for paragraphs upon paragraphs. Joshua - your rape and gun fetishes are showing. Might wanna tuck those in.

16 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • The Immortalists

  • By: Chloe Benjamin
  • Narrated by: Maggie Hoffman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 198
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 182
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 182

It's 1969, and holed up in a grimy tenement building in New York's Lower East Side is a travelling psychic who claims to be able to tell anyone the date they will die. Four siblings, too young for what they are about to hear, sneak out to hear their fortunes. We then follow the intertwined paths the siblings take over the course of five decades and, in particular, how they choose to live with the supposed knowledge the fortune-teller gave them that day. This is a story about life, mortality and the choices we make.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good beginning, weak second half

  • By weasal on 12-06-18

Good beginning, weak second half

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-06-18

I’m just not sure what this book is meant to be. I was enjoying it for Simon and Clara’s stories, then it all kind of fell apart for Daniel and Varia’s. I suppose it didn’t help that I didn’t enjoy their characters at all. I really don’t get what the whole point was of making the death predictions a crucial part of the story when we got no resolution or answers to that at all. And I’ll never enjoy hearing about animal cruelty so that really tainted things for me. Overall I’d say it’s a strange book indeed. But still well written.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • All the Stars in the Sky

  • Until the End of the World, Book 3
  • By: Sarah Lyons Fleming
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 12 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 253
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 239
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 238

Cassie Forrest has sworn she'll never let the world get the best of her again. She's chosen to believe everything will be all right. But on a journey filled with heartbreak and madness and zombies, Cassie and her friends must struggle to stay alive - and it's hard to believe in a future when survival seems unlikely.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • prepare the tissues... to mop-up the sadness.

  • By NormaCenva on 29-11-15

Third and best of the series - rich storytelling

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-01-17

I really enjoyed listening to this trilogy, but none more so than this final instalment. I found that by this point I was so invested in these characters and their plight. You follow along on their journey and are rooting for them and crying for them. I was surprised at how connected I had become with the whole thing and how emotional I was at many different moments. My favourite aspect is Cassy's evolution and the way that her character is drawn so realistically. She is a complete bad-ass in so many ways, but she's also REAL and flawed and so funny and is willing to die for any of the people she loves. She is a true hero and an inspiration. You'd definitely want her on your team during any apocalyptic situation! It was great to have a woman be the protagonist in this genre, and there is also loads of other diversity amongst the characters. Her best friend is a gay man (and he's the anti-stereotype being a big strapping Texan), and there are people of all shapes, sizes, colour and types who feature prominently. The narrator Julia Whelan is EXCELLENT at all the voices. Every voice, even the men's, were all so unique that you immediately knew which character it was. She's really talented to the point that sometimes it felt like I was listening to a play being performed by a whole cast of people.

  • Until the End of the World

  • By: Sarah Lyons Fleming
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 13 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 423
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 395
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 392

Cassie Forrest isn't surprised to learn that the day she’s decided to get her life together is also the day the world ends. After all, she’s been on a self-imposed losing streak since her survivalist parents died: she’s stopped painting, broken off her engagement to Adrian and dated a real jerk. Rectifying her mistakes has to wait, however, because Cassie and her friends have just enough time to escape Brooklyn for her parents’ cabin before Bornavirus LX turns them into zombies, too.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just wonderful

  • By captainsjo on 09-03-15

Enjoyable take on the zombie apocalypse told from a woman's POV

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-16

It started off quite annoying as the focus was too much on the protagonist's love life. I did enjoy it more as things got going though and found myself being caught up in their journey. It's not going down as the most memorable listen in the world but I still enjoyed it and looked forward to finding out what was going to happen next.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • I See You

  • By: Clare Mackintosh
  • Narrated by: Rachel Atkins
  • Length: 10 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,773
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,454
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,452

When Zoe Walker sees her photo in the classifieds section of a London newspaper, she is determined to find out why it's there. There's no explanation, no website - just a grainy image and a phone number. She takes it home to her family, who are convinced it's just someone who looks like Zoe. But the next day the advert shows a photo of a different woman, and another the day after that.Is it a mistake? A coincidence? Or is someone keeping track of every move they make?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I See Something Very, Very Impressive Here!

  • By Simon on 28-07-16

Had to turn it off

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-11-16

So generic and dull. Not much was happening and the lack of strong women was doing my head in.

  • The Last Tribe

  • By: Brad Manuel
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 22 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 788
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 736
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 726

Fourteen-year-old Greg Dixon is living a nightmare. Attending boarding school outside of Boston, he is separated from his family when a pandemic strikes. His classmates and teachers are dead, rotting in a dormitory-turned-morgue steps from his room. The nights are getting colder, and his food has run out. The last message from his father is to get away from the city and to meet at his grandparents' town in remote New Hampshire.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I need more

  • By max on 04-07-16

Ok to listen to but I probably would have ditched it had I been reading it

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-16

As above, it was alright to listen to in the car to pass the time, but I don't think there would have been enough there for me to finish reading it. I ended up really wanting to know how it ended but the ending was a tad disappointing. Nothing really happened in the whole book to be honest! My main gripe is that it was all a bit twee. Everyone got on far too well with each other, were way too jovial for it being post apocalyptic, and it seemed a bit unrealistic how nothing particularly happened to any of the survivors. Bit of a rose tinted glasses version to the end of the world.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful