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herethereandnowhere

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  • Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends On It

  • By: Kamal Ravikant
  • Narrated by: Kamal Ravikant
  • Length: 1 hr and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 387
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 319
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 314

In December of 2011, I gave a talk to an audience of scientists, Pentagon officials, politicians, and CEOs on the secret of life and how I'd figured it out the previous summer. Afterward, people came up individually and told me how much what I'd shared meant to them. This book is based on the truth I spoke about. It's something I learned from within myself, something I believed saved me. And more than that, the way I set about to do it. This is a collection of thoughts on what I learned, what worked, what didn't. Where I succeed and importantly, where I fail daily.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Can't believe I wasted my time and money

  • By D. Fenton on 20-11-16

Major flaws

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-12-18

great book in many respects because it's true to a certain extent your self image is influenced by your thoughts and teaching your neural pathways to love yourself and act from a place of love is great BUT I hate the whole 'you are your thoughts' cult he espoused (an issue with many books). Yes your thoughts shape your reality to an extent but sometimes circumstances are so dire no 'I love myself' will change them or make your life 'magic' as he mentions. For example your family is dying of Ebola no amount of thinking will make things better, you may try and accept it to comfort yourself but they could be dying because aid workers were not deployed in time. It is then the political system that hurt you and your family not your thoughts. inequality, abuse etc. is not a figment of people's imagination and these people should not be gaslighted by the rest of society that has no actual serious problems. The problem here is the remaininh family member could get revenge or get very bitter or get angry (understandably so). If possible non violent resistance seems the right choice. call out the system for it's unjust powerstructure like Martin Luther King or Ghandi . Love needs to win the day not just through thought but action too.

  • Parent Yourself Again

  • Love Yourself the Way You Have Always Wanted to Be Loved
  • By: Yong Kang Chan
  • Narrated by: Scott R. Smith
  • Length: 2 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7

If you are constantly longing for love from someone else such as your parents, partner, or friends, you might want to revisit your childhood. As children, we didn’t receive the love we desire from our parents. So we are still seeking someone to fulfill this void in us. The truth is we have the capacity to love ourselves. The purpose of this book is to help you learn how to love yourself and be your own parent. What your parents failed to do for you in the past, you can do it for yourself now.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Don't waste your money or time.

  • By Gavin McInerney on 20-02-19

great book but some flaws

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-12-18

great advice wonderfully written and narrated BUT this is not great advice for everyone. This is for people who have had mild to moderate trouble with their parents. Apart from the inner work described here which I would highly recommend many people ALSO need to establish firm boundaries (boundaries are not discussed in this book) if the parents keep hurting, intereferring or bullying them or even cut them out completely if they are a really destructive force for your own sanity. The book advises that cutting parents out completely will only make you bitter. Not necessarily so, for many people it's the only way to move on, then they are no subjected to the abuse particularly if the abuse was that bad. Moreover, it is up to the individual to make the right choice for themselves. Clearly the author has only experienced a certain level of abuse if he can conclude breaking away is not an option at all. I don't believe in black and white thinking either you should or shouldn't do something, it's up to the individual or their circumstances.

  • Loving What Is

  • Four Questions That Can Change Your Life
  • By: Byron Katie, Stephen Mitchell
  • Narrated by: Byron Katie, Stephen Mitchell
  • Length: 6 hrs and 47 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 305
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 224
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 222

Out of nowhere, like a fresh breeze in a marketplace crowded with advice on what to believe, comes Byron Katie and what she calls "The Work". In the midst of a normal life, Katie became increasingly depressed. Then one morning, she woke up in a state of absolute joy, filled with the realization of how her own suffering had ended. The freedom of that realization has never left her, and now, in Loving What Is, you can discover the same freedom through The Work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Being ok with the now

  • By Emily on 22-10-10

victim blaming

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-18

apalling dialogue with abuse victim - her methods have limits you cannot apply them to everything some things are just the person's fault and abuse is not am 8year olds fault