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Elizabeth

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  • Kingdom by the Sea

  • A Journey Around the Coast of Britian
  • By: Paul Theroux
  • Narrated by: Ron Keith
  • Length: 14 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12

American-born Paul Theroux had lived in England for 11 years when he realized he'd explored dozens of exotic locations without discovering anything about his adopted home. So, with a knapsack on his back, he set out to explore by walking and by short train trips. The result is a witty, observant and often acerbic look at an ever eccentric assortments of Brits in all shapes and sizes.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Truly terrible narration

  • By S. Collis on 26-07-12

Understated

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-13

This book was interesting but could not be described as uplifting. Partly this is due to the period that the author went on his journey, the Falklands war and the country in recession but also the writing style. Paul Theroux is very good at portraying sadness, neglect etc but not so good at portraying those parts of the coast that he found beautiful, uplifting and enjoyable. I also think that making up fictional names for the people he met along the way allowed him to stereo type them and this was clumsy and detracted from the journey. This also added to the negative feel of the book. I have downloaded another book by the same author but I'm not sure if I am brave enough to listen to it.

  • Hope and Glory

  • The Days That Made Britain
  • By: Stuart Maconie
  • Narrated by: Stuart Maconie
  • Length: 12 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 161
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 103
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 102

In Hope and Glory, Stuart goes in search of the places, people and events of the century we have just left behind that have shaped the look and character of modern Britain. From the death of Victoria to the demise of New Labour, he takes a single event from each decade of the 20th century that offers up a defining moment in our history and then goes in search of its legacy today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely brilliant

  • By Claire Mills on 30-10-11

Brilliant

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-13

This was a fantastic book. I much enjoyed the narration by the author and felt that his reading his own words made them all the more powerful. I think it helps that I am of the same generation as Stuart Maconie and therefore many of the cultural references were relevant to me particularly the sections on the1997 general election and on trade unions and the miners' strike. I was left with the feeling that when I am on a day out I would like to take the author along with me as be finds out the most interesting facts.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Whisky Galore cover art
  • Whisky Galore

  • By: Compton Mackenzie
  • Narrated by: Ken Stott
  • Length: 8 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

Love makes the world go 'round? Not at all. Whisky makes it go 'round twice as fast. This is the hilarious story of wartime bootlegging in the Scottish islands.

Wartime food rationing is bad enough, but when the whisky supplies run out on the Hebridean islands of Great and Little Todday, nothing seems to go right. Then the fifty-thousand-bottle cargo of the shipwrecked S.S. Cabinet Minister brings salvation - in its most giddily intoxicating form.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Glorious

  • By Elizabeth on 07-04-13

Glorious

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-13

This is a book which I think is best appreciated by listening to it rather than by reading it. I would not have picked up on the nuances of the religious differences between the two close knit but nevertheless separate island communities. It was a relaxing gentle read reminiscent of a much earlier time. Woman appear to play a supportive role in the tale but in reality they are the driving force for the narrative. It was also interesting that the boat carrying the cargo of whiskey to America does not make an appearance until quite late in the book.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful