LISTENER

M.RAYN

  • 6
  • reviews
  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 15
  • ratings

A necessary listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-20

I was sceptical as an accredited CBT practitioner I was sceptical about ACT. In my opinion ACT includes interventions that good CBT practitioners use anyway. If thought challenging is not working then moving towards a more acceptance based approach for instance.

I have to say that there is more to it than that. There is something very “open source” about the ACT approach which I like. CBT has been commercialised and the Beck’s have a lot to answer for in that regard.

I still feel that ACT is closer to CBT than it likes to admit but I see the necessity of creating a therapy in itself. So that research and progress in the field can continue.

Psychological or cognitive flexibility will always be at the forefront of my mind when Treating My patients. It always has. I did not need ACT to tell me that. But I did need this book and the work related to it to formalise it so that I’m not just taking shots in the dark or even worse, brute forcing interventions that aren’t helping.

Read with a willingness. Open up to your experience and most of all be flexible my friends.

This is one of the most important books

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-10-19

Please just go for it! Read it! I will leave it at that. An important enquiry into one of the most life changing and fundamental ideas we are are yet to explicitly adopt as a society.

It’s ok and worth a read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-19

As a CBT practitioner I found this book interesting at times and there is some sound advice. It just so happens I was beaten with a belt as a child when ever I broke one of my parents made up rules of the time/they were not bad parents but were following a style of parenting passed on to them by their parents and so on.

I have to say the performance was bad. I found it almost intolerable when she flips into a child’s voice. She also does not use a child’s vocabulary or style and so the message is somewhat lost by this. If anything she just replicates and adult with emotionally unstable personality disorder.

But I can’t disagree with some of her main points. When your child has a tantrum they are not doing it to get at you, they are distressed, even if it is over a chocolate bar. Be patient help them feel what they are experiencing and teach them how to soothe themselves. From my own experience it was not the beatings or the shouting or rewards or threats or presents that helped me moderate my emotions, it was one experience with my grandfather when I became upset age 5/6. He asked me if I wanted to go for a walk, I said yes. We went and watched the sun setting and he told me that there is always a sun. You just have to look, when you see it know that you are loved and that whatever is happening at that time you will be ok in the end and if you’re not ok, it’s just not the end yet.

Another thing. There is no evidence that the way you feel when your child acts up is what you felt when you were their age, this is psychobabble in my view and there is plenty of better evidence for working in the here and now rather than bringing up all the mental guff from our past. I’m not saying don’t explore it or try to understand it but know that you may never understand and that’s ok because it’s not that necessary to.

Give it a read. I think their are some psychotherapeutic insights that could help your child to feel more worthwhile and valued, treat others the same and see the world for what it is, OK

A real life changing text

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-19

I can’t begin to describe how fantastic this book is. It has completely changed my view of the world. I was, before reading this, somewhat xenophobic. I could not think of anything worse than traveling to a “level 1/2/3” country. I am ashamed to say I was ignorant. I am still ignorant but I am able to become less ignorant thanks to this book. My only thought is the very critical thinking tools this book advocates somewhat leads you to challenge the concepts in the very book that provides them but I feel this is a subtly purpose.

Please read this!

For therapists and layman alike

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-19

As a cognitive behavioural therapist myself I have found this book useful for my own practice as well as recommending it to my patients. As an audiobook it takes the sting out of reading and for someone with depression this can be useful. Please check national guidelines and new developments in the field of CBT as this book is old now and can be dated in some cases.

You’ve got to read this

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-05-18

Wordy but brilliant theory. Really brings home the true meaning of compassion-and it’s not all airy fairy, it’s hard. This will challenge you to tap into brain systems within yourself, you will find some benefit from the exercises contained. Don’t be too hard on yourself, it’s counterproductive.

5 people found this helpful