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The Wolf

Glasgow
  • 27
  • reviews
  • 65
  • helpful votes
  • 89
  • ratings
  • Wuthering Heights

  • By: Emily Brontë
  • Narrated by: Janet Paulson
  • Length: 14 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 51
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 49

"Wuthering Heights" is Emily Brontë's only novel. It was first published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, and a posthumous second edition was edited by her sister Charlotte. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the story centers (as an adjective, "wuthering" is a Yorkshire word referring to turbulent weather). The narrative tells the tale of the all-encompassing and passionate, yet thwarted, love between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Suicide

  • By Mrs EM on 11-09-17

Bargain

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-02-18

I only paid 78p for this, and it was well worth it for hours of entertainment. Yes, the narrator is a little dreary, but so is the whole book!
I've posted a more detailed review on my website, but in general I recommend this version of the audiobook. The narrator is pretty good at the different voices and accents and my main issue with it is how depressing the story itself is. Everyone in this book is a grade a git, and they spend all their time pretty much being horrible to one another.
It's a good listen but I much prefer Jane Eyre as the ending was less bleak.

  • A Christmas Carol

  • By: Charles Dickens, R. D. Carstairs - adaptation
  • Narrated by: Sir Derek Jacobi, Kenneth Cranham, Miriam Margolyes, and others
  • Length: 3 hrs and 31 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,397
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,025
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,030

'If I had my way, every idiot who goes around with Merry Christmas on his lips, would be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart. Merry Christmas? Bah humbug!' Charles Dickens’ ghostly tale of sour and stingy miser Ebenezer Scrooge has captivated readers, listeners and audiences for over 150 years. This Christmas, Audible Studios brings this story to life in an audio drama featuring an all-star cast.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • THANK YOU 🎄🤶🏻🎄& Merry Christmas

  • By Highlight on 14-12-16

classic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-12-17

Poor Tiny Tim!
Don't mind admitting I had tears in my eyes at this brilliant performance.
Highly recommended.
Merry Christmas one and all!

  • The Cross and the Curse

  • The Bernicia Chronicles, Book 2
  • By: Matthew Harffy
  • Narrated by: Barnaby Edwards
  • Length: 14 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 107
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 96
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 97

Warlords battle across Britain to become the first king of the English. After a stunning victory against the native Waelisc, Beobrand returns a hero. His valour is rewarded with wealth and land by Oswald, king of Northumbria. He retires to his new estate with his bride only to find himself surrounded by enemies old and new. With treachery and death on all sides, Beobrand fears he will lose all he holds dear. On a quest for revenge and redemption, he accepts the mantle of lord, leading his men into the darkest of nights and the bloodiest of battles.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great listen!

  • By The Wolf on 02-02-17

Great listen!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-17

Longtime friends and followers of mine might know that I endorsed Harffy’s debut novel, The Serpent Sword. That was a self-published affair which garnered enough interest and sales that Matthew was taken on by a major publisher, Aria, and this is the resultant sequel.

The tale is quite straightforward with love, action and beautifully written prose aplenty and, combined with a really good narrator, makes for a great listen. It gets especially nasty (in a good way!) about two-thirds in and things really start to come together there.

I felt a little as if this was a bridge between the first book and the next, setting things up for what’s to come for the rest of the series. That’s no bad thing and there is enough to keep your interest up throughout although I did miss a bit of humour. The events are dark and gritty and the characters know it – but it would have been nice to have a bit of childish banter between the men just to lighten things. As it is, the word I kept thinking of as I listened was “earnest”. The dialogue is earnest, the characters are earnest and the prose is too. I was wishing someone would fart or stand in a dog turd but sadly there’s no slapstick silliness here!

This series has been compared to Bernard Cornwell’s Uhtred stories (by me, actually, in that previously-mentioned endorsement!) but, although settings and time period are similar, the writing is completely different in The Cross and the Curse. Fans of one author will enjoy the other I’m sure, as both are absolutely brilliant.

Steven A. McKay, author of the Forest Lord series

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Eagles at War

  • By: Ben Kane
  • Narrated by: David Rintoul
  • Length: 13 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 166
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 159
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158

Based on real historical events. A time for vengeance AD 9, German frontier: Close to the Rhine, a Roman centurion, Lucius Tullus, prepares to take his soldiers on patrol. On the opposite side of the river, German tribes are resentful of the harsh taxes about to be imposed upon them. Suspicious that there might be unrest, Tullus knows that his men's survival will be determined not just by their training and discipline, but by his leadership.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Read

  • By Ben on 21-08-15

Blood and thunder - literally!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-16

I've been a big fan of Ben Kane's since his very first Forgotten Legion series, and I was reading his first Spartacus novel in the hospital just after my son was born. I really wanted to check out this new series of his, but I don't have much time to read these days so the Audible version was downloaded as soon as I had a spare credit.
The narrator is excellent, really putting himself into the tale and acting rather than simply reading which I really enjoy.
The tale, based on a true story, is a good one, with a few nice twists and turns, some good characters and an ending that sets up the rest of the series very nicely.
I liked the way the author made me wonder who I should be rooting for - who was the "goodie" and who was the "baddie"? In most books that is very clear cut but here you empathise with both sides and that elevates this work above the usual run-of-the-mill action romp.
If I have a criticism it's the fact that a certain character was blind to what was coming, even when it was pointed out to him on more than one occasion. It seemed so obvious that it made the guy in question come across as a bit of a fool but I suppose this is something authors must deal with when they choose to write about true events and people.

Overall, another great book by Ben Kane, although I personally liked the Spartacus novel better and will be downloading the second in that series next.

Steven A. McKay, author of "Wolf's Head"

  • Azure Bonds

  • Forgotten Realms: Finder's Stone, Book 1
  • By: Kate Novak, Jeff Grubb
  • Narrated by: Kristin Kalbli
  • Length: 14 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26

Her name is Alias, and she is in big trouble. She is a sell-sword, a warrior-for-hire, and an adventuress. She awoke with a series of twisting, magical blue sigils inscribed on her arms and no memory of where she got them. Determined to learn the nature of the mysterious tattoo, Alias joins forces with an unlikely group of companions: the halfling bard, Ruskettle, the southern mage, Akabar, and the oddly silent lizard-man, Dragonbait.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Just as good as I remember

  • By C. H. Ford on 11-10-16

Fun fantasy tale.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-16

I first read this book a long time ago when I was a teenager. So, probably about 25 years or so ago. At the time I thought it was great, so when I saw it listed on Audible I thought it'd be worth a listen.
This is one of the old-school, 80's American fantasy novels a la Dragonlance and, as such, it's aimed more at young adults than the likes of Game of Thrones. This is no bad thing in itself but some fantasy fans new to the genre might find this kind of book a little twee.
I was happy to find myself enjoying the tale, which is a good one no matter what age you are, and the characters and events were interesting enough to keep me listening right to the end. I'll buy the second book in the series too at some point, no doubt.
Dragons, magic, sword fights, friendship, a dangerous quest - it's all here and the fact it's aimed at teens means there's some light humour and nothing gets too dark or depressing.
The narrator is okay without being either brilliant or annoying.

Heartily recommended.

Steven A. McKay, author of "Knight of the Cross"

  • Empire

  • The Novel of Imperial Rome
  • By: Steven Saylor
  • Narrated by: James Langton
  • Length: 23 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21

The Pinarii witness the machinations of Tiberius, the madness of Caligula, and the decadence of Nero. The deadly paranoia of Domitian gives way to the Golden Age of Trajan and Hadrian - but even the most enlightened emperors wield the power to destroy their subjects on a whim.Empire is filled with the dramatic, defining moments of the age, including the Great Fire of 64 A.D, Nero’s persecution of the Christians, and the astounding opening games of the Colosseum.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Epic listen, mostly really good

  • By The Wolf on 02-05-16

Epic listen, mostly really good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-16

I've read some of Saylor's stuff in the past and enjoyed it so when I saw this very long audiobook for the princely sum of one credit I knew it would be good value.
And it is! It lasts for a long time so will keep you going until the next credit rolls in. But is it any good?
Yes, for the most part it's well written, has interesting characters and is almost a history lesson without becoming boring or dry.
It follows one family, from generation to generation, as they deal with the various emperors and great events that shaped the mighty Rome. It's all set within Rome itself and it's mainly about people and political events, so don't expect battles or heroic centurions. This is no Ben Kane or Douglas Jackson book but it works, mostly, just as well as something more action oriented as it's so interesting and so well read - the narrator really does a fine job.
The one downside for me was the fact a) everything is rather bleak and depressing, with lots of descriptions of people being tortured for fun while the people lap it up like rabid dogs and b) there's too much emphasis on the sexual appetites of everyone. It seems like everyone in Rome was either a sadist or a nymphomaniac which might be true for all I know, but it doesn't make for the most exciting book. At times I felt like it was too depressing and I just longed to listen to some throwaway, light fantasy or something fun by the likes of Terry Pratchett.
But, overall, this is a fine audiobook - great value for your credit, with a nice performance by the narrator James Langton, and, in general an interesting and nicely structured tale.
Give it a try!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Comrades at Odds

  • A Tale from The Legend of Drizzt
  • By: R. A. Salvatore
  • Narrated by: Ice-T
  • Length: 1 hr and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 13

Actor and musician Ice-T is the Dungeon Master for this emotional, anguished tale. In Comrades at Odds, Tos'un is faced with a difficult decision as Drizzt comes to odds with his grief and guilt over the tragic fate of Ellifain.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Weird combination that ALMOST works.

  • By The Wolf on 02-05-16

Weird combination that ALMOST works.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-16

I've read a few of Salvatore's Drizzt books and thought they were pretty good. I'm also a big fan of Ice-T, either in Law and Order:SVU or his metal band Bodycount - the guy just has a great voice!
So I saw this short story read by him and I thought it was just such a strange combination that it HAD to be cool.
And it kind of is, but ultimately isn't the best book you'll listen to this year.
The story is okay, presumably setting up a new character for later full length novels, but not a lot happens and I felt like this was probably aimed more at fans who are familiar with this era of the stories.
Ice-T's reading is quite good, but it IS reading. He doesn't try to act any of the parts and never varies his voice when it comes to different characters. He reads a woman's lines in the same voice as he reads any of the men's. To be fair, Ice-T putting on a girly voice would have seemed pretty hilarious so it's not surprising he avoided it, but it does mean the performance is lacking something.
It doesn't cost much due to the short running time, and it's overall a decent listen, so I can recommend it - just don't expect too much.

Steven A. McKay, author of "Wolf's Head"

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Macbeth: A Novel

  • By: A. J. Hartley, David Hewson
  • Narrated by: Alan Cumming
  • Length: 9 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 253
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 201
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 201

Macbeth: A Novel brings the intricacy and grit of the historical thriller to Shakespeare’s tale of political intrigue, treachery, and murder. In this full-length novel written exclusively for audio, authors A. J. Hartley and David Hewson rethink literature’s most infamous married couple, grounding them in a medieval Scotland whose military and political upheavals are as stark and dramatic as the landscape in which they are played.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful

  • By Russ on 09-07-12

Good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-03-16

Narration was good and overall I enjoyed this audiobook. A bit light though, it seemed to flick between scenes without much character development. I've never seen the play so thought this would be a good introduction but now I'm not fussed about ever seeing it.
Feels a bit like a wasted opportunity, I think the bones of the story could have been turned into a better modern novel.

  • Nineteen Eighty-Four

  • By: George Orwell
  • Narrated by: Andrew Wincott
  • Length: 12 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,825
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,554
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,547

Big Brother is watching you.... 1984 is the year in which it happens. The world is divided into three superstates. In Oceania, the Party’s power is absolute. Every action, word, gesture and thought is monitored under the watchful eye of Big Brother and the Thought Police. In the Ministry of Truth, the Party’s department for propaganda, Winston Smith’s job is to edit the past. Over time, the impulse to escape the machine and live independently takes hold of him and he embarks on a secret and forbidden love affair.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • excellent narration.

  • By Chris on 20-12-16

Depressing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-16

i understand this is a classic but I found it rather boring. The characters act like robots and the narrator reads in a similar fashion.
The whole idea seems to be that everyone in this future is insane, and the ones in power sadistically so. It all seemed too far fetched to me and the unrelenting horridness of the start soon turns to all out mental and physical torture.
I read Ayn Rand's " Anthem " a couple of weeks before this and that was similar in its Dystopian theme, but much better and a lot less depressing!

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Magicians of the Gods

  • The Forgotten Wisdom of Earth's Lost Civilisation – the sequel to Fingerprints of the Gods
  • By: Graham Hancock
  • Narrated by: Graham Hancock
  • Length: 14 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 749
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 689
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 687

Graham Hancock's multimillion best seller Fingerprints of the Gods remains an astonishing, deeply controversial, wide-ranging investigation of the mysteries of our past and the evidence for Earth's lost civilization. Twenty years on, Hancock returns with the sequel to his seminal work filled with completely new scientific and archaeological evidence which has only recently come to light.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • great

  • By A on 14-12-15

Fascinating stuff!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-02-16

I, of course, read Hancock's earlier book, Fingerprints of the Gods, years ago and it led me onto his other work and more by the likes of Robert Bauval, Graham Phillips, Christopher Dunn etc so I was interested to read this one. Since I don't have much time to read books these days I decided to try the audio version.
I'm glad I did, BUT, it must be said, audio for a book like this has its downside.
First of all, Graham has an entertaining, engaging voice. Yes, he has a slight accent, but who doesn't? It never once annoyed me and, overall, he reads excellently, with a passion and knowledge of the writing that only the author could bring.

However, with a book like this I really like to a) see photos of the things being described and b) research some of the places and themes that are covered.

With a physical book both of these are not a problem, but with audio there are no pictures and on more than one occasion I had no idea how to research something Graham was talking about. These places are in foreign lands, so the spelling isn't always obvious and there's stuff I'd like to have found out more about but I've forgotten what they were now since listening to this while driving around at work made it impossible to take notes!
Still, I got the overall gist of what the book was about and much of it was utterly captivating (that seed bank hidden somewhere underground really captured my attention - I just wish I knew how to spell its name!).
In terms of value for money, this is a really long book so well worth your monthly credit.

These books sell millions, yet they're still viewed by the mainstream as somehow crackpot, which probably puts many people off them.

If you find yourself even remotely interested in the ideas in the book's synopsis I recommend you give this a listen. Maybe try and borrow a copy of the hardback from your local library though, so you can dig deeper yourself!

Recommended.

Steven A. McKay, author of "Wolf's Head".

3 of 4 people found this review helpful