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Glyn Williams

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  • 11
  • helpful votes
  • 11
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  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,807
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,168
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,104

What are the most valuable things that everyone should know? Acclaimed clinical psychologist Jordan Peterson has influenced the modern understanding of personality, and now he has become one of the world's most popular public thinkers. In this book, he provides 12 profound and practical principles for how to live a meaningful life, from setting your house in order before criticising others to comparing yourself to who you were yesterday, not someone else today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Hitchhikers Guide to Heaven

  • By Matthew on 04-02-18

A love story between a man and his own voice

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-09-18

This is a book where Jordan talks a lot.

He tells us about how clever he is. And illustrates it with charming anecdotes about lobsters and chaotic femininity, and a bit of supernaturalism sprinkled on top.

This is not “ popular science” or science of any kind. There is no scientific rigour. There is no peer review. No statistical basis. Just opinions.

It’s is a collection of excuses for mystical faith-based thinking, dressed-up as psychological insight. Bias cosplaying as wisdom.

We should avoid faith-based thinking. It’s dangerous and rendered the past a horrid, cruel and misogynistic place.

( But Jordan thinks the past was much better, so no surprise there.)

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Mind Is Flat

  • By: Nick Chater
  • Narrated by: Nick Chater
  • Length: 7 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of The Mind Is Flat, written and read by Nick Chater. Most of us assume that our thoughts, desires and behaviour arise from the murky depths of our minds, and if only we could access this inner world we could truly understand ourselves. For more than a century, psychologists, psychiatrists and neuroscientists have struggled, using methods from psychotherapy to brain scans, to discover what lies below the surface of our minds. In a profound reappraisal of how the mind works, preeminent behavioural scientist Nick Chater reveals that this entire enterprise is misguided: that we have no mental depths to plumb.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • That thing you didn't think in the first is wrong!

  • By Rich on 22-08-18

This book blew my mind*

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-07-18

* But the resultant explosion was disappointingly small.

This book forces us all to reconsider long-standing myths about the mind. Ideas which have been accepted and unchallenged for centuries are dismantled. The dismantling is done with research and evidence.


2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Three-Body Problem

  • By: Cixin Liu
  • Narrated by: Bruno Roubicek
  • Length: 14 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 599
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 557
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 557

Set against the backdrop of China's Cultural Revolution, a secret military project sends signals into space to establish contact with aliens. An alien civilisation on the brink of destruction captures the signal and plans to invade Earth. Meanwhile, on Earth, different camps start forming, planning to either welcome the superior beings and help them or to fight against the invasion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dont be put off by the science!!

  • By Thomas on 07-03-18

Novel ideas but clunky construction.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-07-18

I tried very hard to like this book. I was delighted to hear science fiction from a point of view other than the US/UK mainstream. And this book is very definitely from a Chinese perspective.

But it never really worked for me. I didn't find the characters compelling. I thought the science was silly. And the core story didn't hold together. In great storytelling we have to see a the predicament of characters and understand why they are motivated to do what they do. I never bought into the motivation of these characters.

This was not helped by the narration, which was often read in a flat robotic monotone.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Black Man

  • By: Richard Morgan
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 22 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60

One hundred years from now, and against all the odds, Earth has found a new stability; the political order has reached some sort of balance, and the new colony on Mars is growing. But the fraught years of the 21st century have left an uneasy legacy.... Genetically engineered alpha males designed to fight the century's wars have no wars to fight and are surplus to requirements. And a man bred and designed to fight is a dangerous man to have around in peacetime....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tricky but good

  • By Christian on 09-11-18

Dark and prescient.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-06-18

One of the most interesting inventions of this book is "Jesusland". The nickname for a country which emerges from a future United States which has divided itself. Jesusland is a theocratic state made up from the "red states", a place where the institutions are racist, and religious indoctrination is enforced.

When the book came out, some critics cited this idea as extreme and unrealistic.
But reading the book today, in the light of Trump, detention centres for children and everything that has happened, it seems all too plausible.

This book does what great science fiction should do. Uses a plausible what-if scenario as a lens to examine the world today.
It's also a pretty thrilling detective yarn.

Was not thrilled by the narration, which had the (anti) hero, Marsalis sound like a London cab driver, and some of the South Americans sound like they were auditioning for the role of Count Dracula.

  • Cibola Burn

  • Book 4 of the Expanse
  • By: James S. A. Corey
  • Narrated by: Jefferson Mays
  • Length: 20 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,188
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,118
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,114

The gates have opened the way to a thousand new worlds, and the rush to colonise has begun. Settlers looking for a new life stream out from humanity's home planets. Illus, the first human colony on this vast new frontier, is being born in blood and fire. Independent settlers stand against the overwhelming power of a corporate colony ship with only their determination, courage, and the skills learned in the long wars of home.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • They replaced the "bad" narrator with the good one

  • By Finlay on 22-06-18

Narration problem solved.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-02-18

Have you listened to any of Jefferson Mays’s other performances? How does this one compare?

I am delighted that Cibola Burn was re-recorded with Jefferson Mays.

Any additional comments?

This audiobook was originally recorded with a different narrator. Hence the many complaints on the site about narration.

It appears the complaints worked, and the book was re-recorded with the same narrator as the rest of the series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful