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Cathy and Fiona Glanville

  • 12
  • reviews
  • 7
  • helpful votes
  • 18
  • ratings
  • Me

  • Moir
  • By: Vic Reeves
  • Narrated by: Vic Reeves
  • Length: 4 hrs and 49 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 49

Peopled with a wonderful collection of warm, wicked, and weird characters, Vic Reeves' memoir is an enchanting, surreal, and utterly hilarious comic gem.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A joy from start to finish....

  • By Dan on 19-04-07

I like him but..

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-16

This is verging on sounding like a cringy Terry Wogan monologue. Xx xx xx xx

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Willful Blindness

  • Why We Ignore the Obvious at Our Peril
  • By: Margaret Heffernan
  • Narrated by: Margaret Heffernan
  • Length: 11 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42

In this controversial and eye-opening book, distinguished businesswomen and writer Margaret Heffernan examines the phenomenon of wilful blindness in all its forms: in history, in business, in government, and in the family. Heffernan takes as her starting point the 2006 case of the US Government vs Enron, in which those in charge failed to observe the corruption that was unfolding before their very eyes, but not knowing was no defence. In our own lives, too, we can be guilty of overlooking what is right in front of us....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating!

  • By Michelle on 16-01-12

Worth a listen but in places it droned right on

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-11-15

Was Willful Blindness worth the listening time?

In parts it was really thought provoking but sometimes it felt a little like I was being told the same thing over and over after I got the point. It is worth a listen though

  • My Week

  • As Told to Hugo Rifkind
  • By: Hugo Rifkind
  • Narrated by: Michael Fenton Stevens
  • Length: 8 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 15

Since it began several years ago Hugo Rifkind's dazzling My Week column has been satirising the high profile and the famous, and basically anyone foolish or unfortunate enough to find themselves at the top of the news agenda that week. The column itself is a fictional diary parodying their movements over seven days in a rarely flattering but always hilarious manner. Rifkind's victims are as diverse and as headline-grabbing as David Cameron, Beyoncé, Oprah Winfrey, Edwina Currie, Barack Obama and Pippa Middleton.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Well performed, surprised me

  • By Cathy and Fiona Glanville on 27-11-15

Well performed, surprised me

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-11-15

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

I would , especially someone who enjoys the (non)characters in politics. It's not my scene but I got swept up in the performance, the perceptive ability of the writer and his ability to turn what he perceives into something odd and imaginative. The only other thing I can think of with the same feel is spitting image. This feels like chilled -reading on the train back from a city job -spitting image.

Any additional comments?

After initially getting disappointed it was boring old prime minister stuff, I enjoyed it.

  • At Home: A Short History of Private Life

  • By: Bill Bryson
  • Narrated by: Bill Bryson
  • Length: 16 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,986
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,187
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,187

Bill Bryson was struck one day by the thought that we devote more time to studying the battles and wars of history than to considering what history really consists of: centuries of people quietly going about their daily business. This inspired him to start a journey around his own house, an old rectory in Norfolk, considering how the ordinary things in life came to be.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • More Fact Pact Bryson

  • By Stewart Webb on 06-06-10

Mmm

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-15

Ok, I love listening to this guy interviewed but I felt like there were other things about houses to say. I feel miffed that I didn't totally love it. I got lost and sidetracked by it a bit and even after putting it on a third time, found it difficult to finish.

  • Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

  • By: Edwin Abbott
  • Narrated by: Alan Munro
  • Length: 4 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 31

Abbott used the fictional two-dimensional world of Flatland to offer pointed observations on the social hierarchy of Victorian culture. However, the novella's more enduring contribution is its examination of dimensions, for which the novella is still popular amongst mathematics, physics, and computer science students. Several films have been made from the story, including a feature film in 2007 called Flatland. Other efforts have been short or experimental films, including one narrated by Dudley Moore and a short film with Martin Sheen titled Flatland: The Movie.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very thought provoking!

  • By Ben on 01-10-13

Note from an oddly shaped (possibly sharp) triangle

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-15

This is just nuts. I hung about thinking about my odd shape and quickly realised this gentleman is possibly scared of women, or triangles or both. It's fascinating but I'm not sure I totally get it. I will try again next time I feel crazy.

  • An Emergency in Slow Motion

  • The Inner Life of Diane Arbus
  • By: William Todd Schultz
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Wiley
  • Length: 7 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 2

Diane Arbus was one of the most brilliant and revered photographers in the history of American art. Her portraits, in stark black and white, seemed to reveal the psychological truths of their subjects. But after she committed suicide at the age of 48, the presumed chaos and darkness of her own inner life became, for many viewers, inextricable from her work. In the spirit of Janet Malcolm's classic examination of Sylvia Plath, The Silent Woman, William Todd Schultz's An Emergency in Slow Motion reveals the creative and personal struggles of Diane Arbus.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I had no idea??

  • By Cathy and Fiona Glanville on 26-11-15

I had no idea??

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-15

I feel a little bit like a nun or ageing spinster now. This lady believed in strangely magical thinking translated into all sorts of noseynesses. At least so I'm told. Interesting but don't really listen to this in the company of kids or boring middle aged woman.

  • Humble Inquiry

  • The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of Telling
  • By: Edgar H. Schein
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 3 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 48
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 40

Communication is essential in a healthy organization. But all too often when we interact with people - especially those who report to us - we simply tell them what we think they need to know. This shuts them down. To generate bold new ideas, to avoid disastrous mistakes, to develop agility and flexibility, we need to practice Humble Inquiry. Ed Schein defines Humble Inquiry as "the fine art of drawing someone out, of asking questions to which you do not know the answer, of building a relationship based on curiosity and interest in the other person."

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Yes okay it's good

  • By Cathy and Fiona Glanville on 26-11-15

Yes okay it's good

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-15

But I feel I've asked far too many badly worded questions this week. Theory is good but in practice I sound like I'm on neighbours, lilting every sentence up at the end to form a flaming question, meh I'm too easily influenced

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Museum of Curiosity: The Complete Gallery 1

  • By: Dan Schreiber, Richard Turner
  • Narrated by: Bill Bailey, John Lloyd
  • Length: 2 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 76
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54

The Museum of Curiosity is BBC Radio 4's monumental comedy edifice, and the only one with gargoyles in the foyer. It allows nothing inside unless it makes you scratch your head, stroke your chin or, at the very least, go 'Hmm'. Secondly, it is almost completely empty. Fortunately, helping to fill its vacant plinths is a gathering of the world's most original minds.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thoroughly entertaining

  • By Priscilla on 07-04-13

Meh..

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-15

I really enjoy the individuals but together it is just something I would switch off on four extra, sorry xx

  • The Marshmallow Test

  • Mastering Self-Control
  • By: Walter Mischel
  • Narrated by: Alan Alda
  • Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 460
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 403
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 404

In The Marshmallow Test, Mischel explains how self-control can be mastered and applied to challenges in everyday life - from weight control to quitting smoking, overcoming heartbreak, making major decisions, and planning for retirement. With profound implications for the choices we make in parenting, education, public policy and self-care, The Marshmallow Test will change the way you think about who we are and what we can be.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fascinating

  • By Judy Corstjens on 30-11-14

A good listen

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-15

Interesting, revealing, a tiny bit slow in parts but really enjoyable. I can say no more my face is stuffed with marshmallows and I'm heading for the door

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Call of the Weird

  • Travels in American Subcultures
  • By: Louis Theroux
  • Narrated by: Louis Theroux
  • Length: 3 hrs and 48 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 589
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 483
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 483

For 10 years, Louis Theroux has been making programmes about off-beat characters on the fringes of US society. Now he revisits America and the people who have most fascinated him to try to discover what motivates them, why they believe the things they believe, and to find out what has happened to them since he last saw them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of my favourite downloads so far

  • By CA Weir on 26-06-07

Honestly Two Faced

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-11-15

In an artful way xx an extension of the series, really enjoyed the strangely human people