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Ward

  • 9
  • reviews
  • 11
  • helpful votes
  • 94
  • ratings
  • Iron Gold

  • By: Pierce Brown
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds, John Curless, Julian Elfer, and others
  • Length: 23 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 662
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 619
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 621

Ten years after the events of Morning Star, Darrow and the Rising are battling the remaining Gold loyalist forces and are closer than ever to abolishing the color-coded caste system of Society for good. But new foes will emerge from the shadows to threaten the imperfect victory Darrow and his friends have earned. Pierce Brown expands the size and scope of his impressive Red Rising universe with new characters, enemies, and conflicts among the stars.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Worthy sequel to a great sci-fi series!

  • By G. P. Brown on 29-01-18

Narator sounds like she constantly in a panic

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-19

Nice story, only the female naration by Aedin Moloney is a constant dissonant. She sound like she’s in a chronic state of panic and anguish.
That’s all well and good when the character is actually in such a state, but not all the time...

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Disappearance of Winter's Daughter

  • By: Michael J. Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Michael J. Sullivan, Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 336
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 318
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 319

When Gabriel Winter's daughter mysteriously disappears and is presumed dead, the wealthy whiskey baron seeks revenge. Having lived in Colnora during the infamous Year of Fear, he hires the one man he knows can deliver a bloody retribution - the notorious Duster.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • More cinematic than the others

  • By cg on 29-12-17

Series getting worse with every book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-18

What disappointed you about The Disappearance of Winter's Daughter?

I really enjoyed the Revelations, but with every book, the Cronicles are getting worse. The main storyline is uninventive and predictable, the interplay between the characters reaches boaring levels of repetition. To much focus on the characters, not enough on the main story.

What will your next listen be?

Something completely different, Stuart McBride, maybe

What three words best describe Michael J. Sullivan and Tim Gerard Reynolds ’s performance?

Getting worse

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Disappearance of Winter's Daughter?

The end is like a candle blowing out...

Any additional comments?

Please stop!!

6 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • All of a Winter's Night

  • Merrily Watkins Mysteries, Book 14
  • By: Phil Rickman
  • Narrated by: Emma Powell
  • Length: 14 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 96
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 88
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 90

When Aidan Lloyd's bleak funeral is followed by a nocturnal ritual in the fog, it becomes all too clear that Aidan, son of a wealthy farmer, will not be resting in peace. Aidan's hidden history has reignited an old feud, and a rural tradition begins to display its sinister side. It's already a fraught time for Merrily Watkins, her future threatened by a bishop committed to restricting her role as diocesan exorcist for Hereford.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent, had me guessing up to the very end

  • By Simie on 25-11-17

Kept on falling asleep

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-07-17

What would have made All of a Winter's Night better?

More focus in the story and less tittle-tattle. I've listened to all Rickman's books and like his stories very much, but in my very private and relative opinion, he's going rather overboard in trying to give his storytelling the feminine touch in the Merrily Watkins books. A fact that - at first - comes over as something that you just have to get used to, but after 14 books starts getting rather tiresome.

This, combined with the very low key and monotone narration by Emma Powell, simply makes it hard to keep interested in the story and very easy to fall asleep. Because of the monotone drone and the very small variations in voice, I had great trouble to find the point in the story that I actually picked up consciously, before continuing to listen. It almost sound like an old spinster whispering gossips in your ears.

What could Phil Rickman have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

The main characters start coming over as a couple of weak, unbalanced and - in the case of Jane - deliberately always contrary persons. This makes - to me as a 54 year old man - the whole thing sound like a somewhat over-driven try to write out of a feminine perspective. It does not feel natural anymore.

Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Emma Powell?

Emma Powell when she's awake?

You didn’t love this book--but did it have any redeeming qualities?

Not that I can think of. Felt like an uninspired try to keep the MW series going, far past the point at which the author stopped being interested.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Vagrant

  • By: Peter Newman
  • Narrated by: Jot Davies
  • Length: 13 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 189
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 175

The Vagrant is his name. He has no other. Years have passed since humanity's destruction emerged from the Breach. Friendless and alone he walks across a desolate, war-torn landscape. A s each day passes the world tumbles further into depravity, bent and twisted by the new order, corrupted by the Usurper, the enemy, and his infernal horde. His purpose is to reach the Shining City, last bastion of the human race, and deliver the only weapon that may make a difference in the ongoing war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unusual and compelling

  • By Andrew on 02-05-15

Grows on you

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-05-17

After initially wanting to put it aside, the book gradually grew on me and I have to say; not too shabb

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Hanging Tree

  • Rivers of London, Book 6
  • By: Ben Aaronovitch
  • Narrated by: Kobna Holdbrook-Smith
  • Length: 10 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,191
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,990
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,977

Suspicious deaths are not usually the concern of PC Peter Grant or the Folly, even when they happen at an exclusive party in one of the most expensive apartment blocks in London. But Lady Ty's daughter was there, and Peter owes Lady Ty a favour. Plunged into the alien world of the super-rich, where the basements are bigger than the house and dangerous, arcane items are bought and sold on the open market, a sensible young copper would keep his head down and his nose clean. But this is Peter Grant we're talking about.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • As usual, a great read.

  • By Justine on 12-12-16

Drifted off now and again

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-12-16

Would you listen to The Hanging Tree again? Why?

I think I'll have to, because for the first time, I frequently drifted off and totally lost track of the story and dialogues.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

This one was not as captivating as his previous ones. Feels like an interlude. This might perhaps have worked better as an integral part of a somewhat larger story.

What about Kobna Holdbrook-Smith’s performance did you like?

He's good.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

There was none. It mainly made me long for the earlier books.

Any additional comments?

Enough said.

  • Great & Secret Show

  • By: Clive Barker
  • Narrated by: Chet Williamson
  • Length: 22 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 59
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 59

In the little town of Palomo Grove, two great armies are amassing; forces shaped from the hearts and souls of America. In this New York Times best-seller, Barker unveils one of the most ambitious imaginative landscapes in modern fiction, creating a new vocabulary for the age-old battle between good and evil. Carrying its readers from the first stirring of consciousness to a vision of the end of the world, The Great and Secret Show is a breathtaking journey in the company of a master storyteller.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My favourite book

  • By Jay on 03-09-16

Couldn't keep me focussed on the story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-16

Would you try another book written by Clive Barker or narrated by Chet Williamson?

Well, no...
I listened to a couple, narrated by some British narrators and they pulled me right in. This one didn't, be it the story or the American drawl; I just zoomed out and whole passages passed me by.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

Pfff, glad to be through it...

Did Chet Williamson do a good job differentiating each of the characters? How?

I never listen to books, narrated by American speakers, but I'll conceed that a story like this, wholy based in the US, needs a native US narrator, rather than a Brit.
Having said that, Chet Williamson has a rather monotone and sonore voice and does not differentiate much betwwn characters. He did not succeed in drawing me in.

If this book were a film would you go see it?

Nope!

Any additional comments?

I really liked Imajica, Weaveworld and The Damnation game, but this story got way out of hand to my taste.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • In The Darkness, That's Where I'll Know You: The Complete Black Room Story

  • By: Luke Smitherd
  • Narrated by: Luke Smitherd
  • Length: 12 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,826
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,759
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,756

There are hangovers, there are bad hangovers, and then there's waking up inside someone else's head. Thirty-something bartender Charlie Wilkes is faced with this dilemma when he wakes up to find himself trapped inside The Black Room - a space consisting of impenetrable darkness and a huge, ethereal screen floating in its center. It is through this screen that he sees the world of his female host, Minnie.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Highly recommended

  • By Peter on 15-04-16

That was well worth the listen!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-05-16

What made the experience of listening to In The Darkness, That's Where I'll Know You: The Complete Black Room Story the most enjoyable?

Very original story, different aspects (suspense, horror, romance) in perfect balance.

What other book might you compare In The Darkness, That's Where I'll Know You: The Complete Black Room Story to, and why?

Uhm... It somewhat reminded me of "Ring around the Sun" by Clifford D. Simak. Not because the style or actual story-line are alike, but because it covers parallel universes in a similar, very personalised way.

What does Luke Smitherd bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

He may not be the best narrator in terms of pronunciation, but you can hear how he meant the story to flow and that's worth a lot.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Listen to the audiobook first!

Any additional comments?

I'd like to read/listen to some more stuff of Luke's.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dawn of Wonder

  • The Wakening, Book 1
  • By: Jonathan Renshaw
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 29 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,170
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,033
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,032

When a high-ranking officer gallops into the quiet Mistyvales, he brings a warning that shakes the countryfolk to their roots. But for Aedan, a scruffy young adventurer with veins full of fire and a head full of ideas, this officer is not what he seems. The events that follow propel Aedan on a journey that only the foolhardy or desperate would risk, leading him to the gates of the nation's royal academy - a whole world of secrets in itself. But this is only the beginning of his discoveries.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Coming of Age Fantasy

  • By Simon on 15-02-17

Pleasurable listen, with some observations

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-05-16

If you could sum up Dawn of Wonder in three words, what would they be?

Nice story, interesting twist, somewhat childish storytelling

What did you like best about this story?

The narration

What does Tim Gerard Reynolds bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Plausible characters and good voice to keep me interested

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Not especially

Any additional comments?

Many of these books, written by American writers, have one version or other of the all too familiar American idiom as a part of the story line. Aspects such as the underdog overcoming the school-bully, prom-like parties, popular kids versus nerds and so on feature in most of them in some guise. Perhaps you can't blame them for unconsciously incorporating these themes into their books, but I would be rather interested to see what this book would have turned out like, if it was written by a European writer, not steeped in Americana.

  • The Atlantis World

  • The Origin Mystery, Book 3
  • By: A.G. Riddle
  • Narrated by: Stephen Bel Davies
  • Length: 9 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 232
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 221
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 220

Northern Morocco: Dr. Kate Warner cured a global pandemic, and she thought she could cure herself. She was wrong. And she was wrong about the scope of the Atlantis conspiracy. Humanity faces a new threat, an enemy beyond imagination. With her own time running out and the utter collapse of human civilization looming, a new hope arrives: a coded message from a potential ally.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A good ending

  • By Angela on 13-04-18

Sleep inducing story, monotone robotic narration

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-02-15

What disappointed you about The Atlantis World?

Everything. Usually I don't take the time to write reviews, but this trilogy is so toe-curlingly bad and tedious that I felt obliged to do so and warn unsuspecting listeners...

What was most disappointing about A.G. Riddle’s story?

Storyline, totally one-dimensional characters, stumbling repetitive writing style

How could the performance have been better?

By choosing a narrator, able to speak one single sentence without misplacing spaces, punctuation and emphasis. This guy pulls it off to put pauses in the middle of the most simple sentences and his delivery is extremely monotone and flat.

You didn’t love this book--but did it have any redeeming qualities?

Yes. Warning me off of all other work touched by this writer or narrator. I dregged myself through the complete trilogy out of sheer bloody-minded hope that somewhere it would get better, but these guys have no business wrting books or narrating them. Not for European readers or listeners, that is.

Any additional comments?

Apart from all this; the story, writing style, vocabulary, moral code, personages and overall world view are far too American, simplistic and 1 dimensional for my taste.