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Alexandra (Audible Editor)

  • 7
  • reviews
  • 29
  • helpful votes
  • 9
  • ratings
  • The Roanoke Girls

  • By: Amy Engel
  • Narrated by: Brittany Pressley
  • Length: 10 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 170
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 156

Lane Roanoke is 15 when she comes to live with her grandparents and fireball cousin at the Roanoke family's rural estate following the suicide of her mother. Over one long, hot summer, Lane experiences the benefits of being one of the rich and beautiful Roanoke girls. But what she doesn't know is being a Roanoke girl carries a terrible legacy: either the girls run, or they die. For there is darkness at the heart of Roanoke, and when Lane discovers its insidious pull, she must make her choice....

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Up to chapter 18 and I gave up.....

  • By L. russell on 23-03-17

Intoxicating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-18

I got completely caught up in this book - Amy Engel has created something so compelling with her portrait of this midwestern family with it's tangled roots and complicated legacy. Roanoke, the rambling family home in the middle of nowhere, is the setting for Engel's novel which spans across the different generations of mothers, daughters and wives that make up this unconventional family, And presiding over it all is the enigmatic patriarch: the grandfather. Without giving too much away, the relationships that slowly begin to emerge are complicated and sometimes incomprehensible yet I found myself wanting to understand it all from their point of view. It certainly isn't a stretch to compare this to Emma Cline's The Girls or My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent - both outstanding listens that deal with similar themes.

The many and varied female characters are portrayed with sensitivity and nuance by Engel, where it so easily could have veered off into cliche. A truly brilliant audiobook.

  • Paper Ghosts

  • By: Julia Heaberlin
  • Narrated by: Antonia Campbell-Hughes
  • Length: 8 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 31
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 31

Having lived his life suspected of being a serial killer, Carl Louis Feldman begins his journey into old age at a nursing home in Texas. Though he was never charged with any crimes, the staff aren’t sorry to see him go when his estranged daughter arrives to take her father on what could be his last road trip. When Carl protests that this is not his daughter at all, the nurses are all too ready to excuse it as a product of his steadily deteriorating mind. But were those old suspicions about him true? And if he is an honest man, who has just driven him away from safety?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Paper Ghosts That Enfold You With Their Story

  • By Simon on 20-04-18

Heaberlin does it again

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-18

Black Eyed Susans was a standout listen for me a few years ago so anticipation and expectations were high for Julia Heaberlin's next offering. And there was absolutely room for disappointment as I sped through Paper Ghosts. The central characters - one man abandoned in a decrepit retirement home and a young woman hell-bent on avenging her sister's presumed murder - present us with an interesting initial set-up and are also completely unique protagonists (a rare thing for a commercial thriller). I loved the turns this audiobook took, the fierce independence of young Grace and the deep American South setting.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Everything I Know About Love

  • By: Dolly Alderton
  • Narrated by: Dolly Alderton
  • Length: 8 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,900
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,694
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,691

When it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir, she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod-Stewart themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you've ever been able to rely on, and finding that that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not for everyone

  • By Ade B on 22-08-18

Thank you, Dolly

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-02-18

It’s no easy thing to talk in searingly honest detail about all the relationships you’ve had, romantic or otherwise, with even your closest friends let alone publish an entire book chronicling them for all the world to listen to. But that’s exactly what makes Dolly’s book so incredibly refreshing and just very brave. Books on dating and ‘how to be single’ aren’t exactly few and far between but how many of them are willing to readily admit, for example, the time when they modified their personality just to make a relationship work? So it’s fair to say that Everything I Know About Love doesn’t exactly conform to the stereotype of dating/self-help/relationship books because the author’s not one to be stereotyped herself. And, if there’s one thing you take away from listening to Dolly’s highs and lows, it’s that it’s really your friendships that you need to keep hold of, keep sight of and keep working at.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Killers of the Flower Moon

  • Oil, Money, Murder and the Birth of the FBI
  • By: David Grann
  • Narrated by: Will Patton, Ann Marie Lee, Danny Campbell
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 267
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 251
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 250

In the 1920s the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And this was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • brilliant

  • By Ms. Ej Austin on 19-06-17

The birth of the FBI

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-11-17

Whether you regularly devour history audiobooks or have never even considered listening to non-fiction accounts of the past, I think you'll find it difficult to resist David Grann's Killers of the Flower Moon. A history of the crimes inflicted on the Osage Indian nation and the role that the fledgling FBI played in the investigations unfolds more like a fast-paced thriller, not just for the completely enthralling style of writing but also because the events just seem too unbelievable to have ever taken place. While the ever-growing web of lies and conspiracies clearly takes centre-stage here, it's the window into the lives of both the Osage people and the men employed by a young Hoover to carry out his agenda that fascinated me. And with the great Will Patton as one of the narrators, it's easily one of the best books I've listened to in a while.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • This Is How It Always Is

  • By: Laurie Frankel
  • Narrated by: Gabra Zackman
  • Length: 11 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 259
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 243
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 242

 This is Claude. He's five years old, the youngest of five brothers, and loves peanut butter sandwiches. He also loves wearing a dress, and dreams of being a princess. When he grows up, Claude says, he wants to be a girl. Rosie and Penn want Claude to be whoever Claude wants to be. They're just not sure they're ready to share that with the world. Soon the entire family is keeping Claude's secret. Until one day it explodes. Laurie Frankel's This Is How It Always Is is a novel about revelations, transformations, fairy tales, and family. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A completely genius debut

  • By Alexandra (Audible Editor) on 16-03-17

A completely genius debut

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-03-17

Transgender issues have been talked about from many different perspectives but through the eyes of five-year-old Claude, Laurie Frankel manages to present us with something entirely new. And in the process, she's managed to make me think about gender and identity in a completely different way. As young Poppy gradually emerges, the listener is encouraged to confront the complexities of the situation as well as realising that they by no means define a person or their potential.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • How to Be a Woman

  • By: Caitlin Moran
  • Narrated by: Caitlin Moran
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,525
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,194
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,182

1913 - Suffragette throws herself under the King's horse. 1969 - Feminists storm Miss World. Now - Caitlin Moran rewrites "The Female Eunuch" from a bar stool and demands to know why pants are getting smaller. There's never been a better time to be a woman: we have the vote and the Pill, and we haven't been burnt as witches since 1727. However, a few nagging questions do remain.... Why are we supposed to get Brazilians? Should you get Botox? Do men secretly hate us? What should you call your vagina?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Indispensable listening

  • By GlaswegianLassie on 23-12-12

The brutal honesty will catch you off guard

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-16

This is by no means a straightforward, cheerful rags-to-riches story from a Wolverhampton native. Instead, Caitlin Moran shares with her reader everything from the minutiae of her childhood in a houseful of siblings to the often-brutal realities of eventually having her own children. What makes it a truly brilliant autobiography is the way she is able to tap back into the mind of her younger self, by virtue of having access to the diaries she once kept, while also pointing out some blatant but important feminist truths, chapter by chapter. Caitlin Moran is hilarious and this book is amazing.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair

  • By: Joël Dicker
  • Narrated by: Robert Slade
  • Length: 20 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,006
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 940
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 937

August 30, 1975: the day of the disappearance. The day Somerset, New Hampshire, lost its innocence. That summer, struggling author Harry Quebert fell in love with 15-year-old Nola Kellergan. Thirty-three years later, her body is dug up from his yard, along with a manuscript copy of the novel that secured his lasting fame. Quebert is the only suspect. Marcus Goldman - Quebert’s most gifted protégé - throws off his writer’s block to clear his mentor’s name. Solving the case and penning a new best seller soon merge into one.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • well i quite liked it

  • By knittyboot on 15-05-14

Only the best work of fiction ever

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-04-16

Joel Dicker's novel may be lengthy but it keeps you captivated all the way through. And although the premise is centred around the unsolved murder of a young girl, it quickly becomes clear that the book is so much more than that. It's about a young writer discovering the secrets of the past of his beloved teacher and having to reconcile the two. But what I loved most about the entire story is its setting: a seemingly innocent town that has been hiding some horrible truths for a very long time. I have been recommending this book to anyone that will listen ever since I finished it. I was completely gripped by the whole thing and so I am yet to be convinced that anything is as compelling as this.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful