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NicE

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  • 10
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  • Horus Rising

  • The Horus Heresy, Book 1
  • By: Dan Abnett
  • Narrated by: Toby Longworth
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,377
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,211
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,216

It is the 31st millennium. Under the benevolent leadership of the Immortal Emperor, the Imperium of Man hasstretched out across the galaxy. It is a golden age of discovery and conquest. But now, on the eve of victory, the Emperor leaves the front lines, entrusting the great crusade to his favourite son, Horus. Promoted to Warmaster, can the idealistic Horus carry out the Emperor's grand plan, or will this promotion sow the seeds of heresy amongst his brothers?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truly Amazing!

  • By David C. on 13-01-18

Enjoyed the story but 20 Books?!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-11-18

I did enjoy this book. It was a reasonably interesting story. Although the cosmic crusade is a bit of a SF trope. I did start to warm to some of the characters as the book developed as the apparently one dimensional super soldiers started to show that there was more to them than simply obeying the order to kill. But it is largely killing to order.

My biggest problem is that fact that the Horus Heresy extends to 20 books and counting. I am not willing to invest that many credits on something that open-ended. It is a pity that it is not broken down into sections so I don't have invest in the whole series to get something out of it.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Lusam

  • The Dragon Mage Wars, Books 1-2
  • By: Dean Cadman
  • Narrated by: Alex Wyndham
  • Length: 12 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 187
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 180
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 180

Lusam grew up in the relative safety of the Elveen mountains with his grandmother. She taught him the basics of magic and discovered, quite by accident, that he possessed a unique skill never seen before: the ability to hide his magical aura from the mage-sight of others. Dark secrets surround Lusam's origins, and the dark agents of the Empire will stop at nothing to kill Lusam.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Compelling listening!!

  • By craig on 13-03-17

Maddening poorly written

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-06-17

What disappointed you about Lusam?

Really poorly written. Firstly, it is a garden variety "child with amazing powers that doesn't know his importance and living on the streets". Nothing new to see here.

The second is the sheer poor writing. Everything is spelt out as if they were writing for someone with a memory of a goldfish. Also, there is a huge amount of unnecessary repetition. Thoughts about a subject are then repeated verbatim when talking to another character. It happens in smaller ways. "The knife flew through the air and thudded into his chest. He looked at the knife that had thudded into his chest".
Needed a good editor to tighten up the writing.

Would you ever listen to anything by Dean Cadman again?

Unlikely, unless his writing skills improve considerably.

Which character – as performed by Alex Wyndham – was your favourite?

None really, they were all very one dimensional.

What character would you cut from Lusam?

I wouldn't cut them, just make them more believable.

8 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Dawn of Wonder

  • The Wakening, Book 1
  • By: Jonathan Renshaw
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 29 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,175
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,038
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,037

When a high-ranking officer gallops into the quiet Mistyvales, he brings a warning that shakes the countryfolk to their roots. But for Aedan, a scruffy young adventurer with veins full of fire and a head full of ideas, this officer is not what he seems. The events that follow propel Aedan on a journey that only the foolhardy or desperate would risk, leading him to the gates of the nation's royal academy - a whole world of secrets in itself. But this is only the beginning of his discoveries.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Coming of Age Fantasy

  • By Simon on 15-02-17

Absolute Excellent: Great Story and Characters

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-04-17

If you could sum up Dawn of Wonder in three words, what would they be?

I thought that this would be another enjoyable but ultimately a time-passing fantasy.

But I was wrong. This book is excellent. Jonathan Renshaw has written a book full of interesting and engaging characters who inhabit a medieval world of daring deeds and dreadful beasts.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Aedan (the hero) is naturally the best-drawn character who is clearly very capable but remains real and has faults and failings.

What does Tim Gerard Reynolds bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

The narrator does an excellent job of bringing the author's writing to life. There are many little jokes and amusing asides that have made me chuckle and the narrator reading helps enormously.

  • The Name of the Wind

  • The Kingkiller Chronicle, Book 1
  • By: Patrick Rothfuss
  • Narrated by: Rupert Degas
  • Length: 28 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 10,570
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 9,334
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,318

I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the university at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep. My name is Kvothe. You may have heard of me.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent!

  • By Robyn on 31-01-13

Beautifully written story, excellent narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-16

This is a must read for anyone who loves fantasy and has become disillusioned with poor characterisation and derivative plots.

The story is told brilliantly, weaving between events in the present and the detailed reminiscences of the main character Kvothe.

It leads us through the traumatic events of his childhood and his education in magic arts at the University.

The characters are well drawn and the plot is well told and has excitement and pace. The author has a great turn of phrase and I often found myself snorting with laughter at an observation or comment by a character.

However, one of the best aspects of this production is the quality of the narration. It is absolutely terrific. He creates brilliant voices and he adds a huge amount to the subtle humour that runs through the book.

A really excellent book. I couldn't put it down.

  • The Shadow of What Was Lost

  • The Licanius Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: James Islington
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 25 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,594
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,489
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,487

It has been 20 years since the end of the war. The dictatorial Augurs - once thought of almost as gods - were overthrown and wiped out during the conflict, their much-feared powers mysteriously failing them. Those who had ruled under them, men and women with a lesser ability known as the Gift, avoided the Augurs' fate only by submitting themselves to the rebellion's Four Tenets.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • The tag line says it all...almost

  • By Mike on 07-07-15

Engaging story with great narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-15

A really enjoyable take that builds through the book. The characters show development and are interesting and varied. However, it can be difficult to keep track of names and terms. The story moves along well and there are enough twists and turns to keep you guessing - plenty of these are yet to be revealed. If I have a slight reservation, it is that places are not always well described - so there is not the sense of wonder about locations.

I really appreciated the narration, the deep voice was surprising at the start but it gave the book a huge amount of gravity. Inspired choice!

I am looking forward to the next book in the series.

  • On the Historicity of Jesus

  • Why We Might Have Reason for Doubt
  • By: Richard Carrier
  • Narrated by: Richard Carrier
  • Length: 28 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 69
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61

The assumption that Jesus existed as a historical person has occasionally been questioned in the course of the last hundred years or so, but any doubts that have been raised have usually been put to rest in favor of imagining a blend of the historical, the mythical, and the theological in the surviving records of Jesus. Historian and philosopher Richard Carrier reexamines the whole question and finds compelling reasons to suspect the more daring assumption is correct.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Even more convincing than I thought it would be!

  • By Jack on 14-03-16

Thorough explanation of the Christ myth

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-03-15

Beautifully written explanation of the argument that Christ was a mythical being who did not have an earthly life.

Dr Carrier looks at a wide range of evidence; the cultural background; other parallel religious practice; non Christian historical sources; New Testament evidence to bring forward this case.

Using Bayes Theorem to create a rigorous method for assessing each piece of evidence Dr Carrier comes to the conclusion that Christ is most probably a myth.
Throughout the book Dr Carrier attempts to be as accommodating to the opposite case (historical Christ). Actually, it seemed fairly obvious to me that the actual case for historicity was even less strong. I certainly learned a great deal more about the ideas and concerns of early Christians and why they chose to write stories about a person who never existed.
Dr Carrier reads his own book very well. This certainly added to the experience for me.
I would heartily recommend this book to anyone who has a genuine interest in finding out about the origins of Christianity. Be prepared to listen to it more than once!

8 of 10 people found this review helpful