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Annie

Todmorden, United Kingdom
  • 17
  • reviews
  • 100
  • helpful votes
  • 57
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  • The Lewis Man

  • By: Peter May
  • Narrated by: Peter Forbes
  • Length: 10 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,430
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,015
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,000

An unidentified corpse is recovered from a peat bog on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland. News of the discovery soon reaches Fin Macleod. However, since swapping his life in Edinburgh for a quiet existence on Lewis, such mysteries are no longer a concern for the former detective inspector. Or so he thought. The sequel to The Blackhouse, which was selected for the WH Smith Richard and Judy Bookclub, and the second book in the Lewis trilogy. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Atmospheric sequel to The Blackhouse

  • By Kirstine on 24-02-12

First class writing, first class storytelling.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-12

I have just finished listening to 'The Lewis Man'. After listening to 'The Black House' a few months ago I knew that I was in for another absorbing listen and I was not disappointed; in fact the author surpassed even my high expectations. Peter May can not only tell a cracking good story, he also has the gift of a truly beautiful literary style, combined with an insight into human nature that renders each character completely believable. His vivid descriptive passages of the islands and their ever-changing weather patterns were able to transport me instantly and effortlessly from wherever I happened to be listening at the time: a warm and sunny garden, crowded tube train or my comfy bed. This is a wonderfully crafted story - intelligent, thrilling, poignant and life-affirming. Peter Forbes' narration is exemplary, doing great justice to all May's well-drawn characters. This is worth far more than the maximum 5 stars allowed for a review. Thank you, Mr May and thank you to Audible for bringing such quality writing to our ears.

11 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Cabin Pressure, The Complete Series 1

  • By: John Finnemore
  • Narrated by: Stephanie Cole, Roger Allam, Benedict Cumberbatch
  • Length: 2 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,729
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,278
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,273

John Finnemore (Dead Ringers & Mitchell & Webb) has written this brilliant new sitcom starring Stephanie Cole, Roger Allam & Benedict Cumberbatch. Cabin Pressure is set in a small airline business. The flipside of the glamorous world of international airlines.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Cabin Pressure

  • By Elizabeth on 14-07-09

LOL - as they say nowadays.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-11

This is absolutely Laugh Out Loud fare. Benedict Cumberbatch - always excellent at everything he does - is a wonderful foil for Roger Allam's biting wit. The hapless Martin is a gem. Stephanie Cole holds this motley crew together with a vicious tongue. Loved it.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Cabin Pressure: The Complete Series 2

  • By: John Finnemore
  • Narrated by: Stephanie Cole, Roger Allam, Benedict Cumberbatch, and others
  • Length: 2 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,240
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 948
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 939

Stephanie Cole ("Doc Martin"), Benedict Cumberbatch and Roger Allam ("The Thick Of It") star in the complete second series of the hit sitcom about the pilots of a tiny charter airline for whom no job is too small, but many, many jobs are too difficult.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Even Better.....

  • By Joan on 01-07-11

2nd series - second best.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-11

Not quite as slick as the first series, some of the humour was slightly laboured, but still worth a listen.

  • Good As Dead

  • By: Mark Billingham
  • Narrated by: Mark Billingham
  • Length: 10 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 415
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 174

The Hostage. Police officer Helen Weeks walks into her local newsagent's on her way to work. Little does she know that this simple daily ritual will change her life forever. It's the last place she expects to be met with violence, but as she waits innocently at the till, she comes face to face with a gunman. The Demand. The crazed hostage-taker is desperate to know what really happened to his beloved son, who died a year before in youth custody.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Kept me listening

  • By Kirstine on 30-08-11

Astounding accomplishment

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-09-11

The mood of this book grips the listener from the very beginning. The twists and turns of the plot as the story unfolds will have you believing that you have traced the developments to a satisfying conclusion only to execute some nifty side-stepping and prove you wrong. As for the narration, Mark Billingham is exceptional - even better than some of the radio actors that narrate Audible's books. He gave distinct and believable voice to every character. An astounding achievement.

  • Before the Poison

  • By: Peter Robinson
  • Narrated by: Simon Slater, Sandra Duncan, Al Senter
  • Length: 13 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 226
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 99
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 101

Through years of success in Hollywood composing music for Oscar-winning films, Chris Lowndes always imagined he would come full circle, home to Yorkshire with his beloved wife, Laura. Now he’s back in the Yorkshire Dales, but Laura is dead, and Chris needs to make a new life for himself. The isolated house he buys sight unseen should give him the space to come to terms with his grief and the quiet to allow to him to work. Kilnsgate House turns out to be rather more than he expected, however.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Relaxing book.

  • By compo on 29-09-11

Peter Robinson at his very best.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-09-11

As a long-standing fan of DI Alan Banks, I was not sure I'd take easily to his absence from a Peter Robinson novel, but ‘Before the Poison’ has convinced me that Mr. Robinson does not need the established figure of DI Banks to prove his worth as a writer of gripping fiction. I was intrigued from the outset; Robinson uses the familiar setting of a brooding, wintry Yorkshire - a landscape which he has always painted extremely vividly - and has peopled it with believable, often likeable, characters. Earlier on in the book we are treated to some wonderfully spine-tingling moments, brought about by Chris Lowe's ‘visions’ when he is alone in the house, but we are never thrust into the realms of pure fantasy. Chris is sensitive, but we are never led to believe he is ‘flaky’ or impressionable.
Grace Fox's narrative is, for me, the most engrossing element of the book, developing her character whilst making no direct reference to the crime for which she was hanged. I also found it surprising as I had never before heard Robinson speak so convincingly with a woman’s voice.
Simon Slater does an admirable job of portraying a range of characters: male, female, transatlantic and Yorkshire born-and-bred but his young, mellifluous voice made it difficult for me to visualise a 60-year-old man. For some reason I kept imagining a character resembling Rupert Penry-Jones. An older voice would have made it easier to put a face to Chris Lowe’s character.
This aside, I was completely absorbed in the story. I loved the many layers of the developing plot, the red herrings – oh yes, I was totally convinced I’d ‘got it’ on at least two occasions! – the drawing together of all the threads and now, 24 hours after listening to the closing sentences, I can still feel the reverberations of Grace’s traumatic war-time experiences and the late-night stirrings in the rooms of Kilnsgate House. Peter Robinson has excelled himself with this one. Absolutely brilliant.

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

Death at the President's Lodging cover art
  • Death at the President's Lodging

  • An Inspector Appleby Mystery
  • By: Michael Innes
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hogan
  • Length: 9 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 89
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 32

Inspector Appleby is called to St Anthony's College, where the president has been murdered in his lodging. Scandal abounds when it becomes clear that the only people with any motive to murder him are the only people who had the opportunity - because the President's Lodging opens off Orchard Ground, which is locked at night, and only the Fellows of the College have keys.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More from this author, please

  • By John on 07-07-10

A good old-fashioned, intelligent Whodunnit.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-05-11

Brilliant, brilliant, brilliant. A murder in academia is always intriguing and it doesn't get better than this. The story has all the right ingredients: a murder committed in a room from which no-one has left or entered; a bizarre set of objects scattered around the body; a list of suspects all with opportunity and motive...all good stuff. And couched in the most beautiful language, narrated excellently by Stephen Hogan. The erudition of the author and his wonderful gift for prose writing make this an even richer experience for the listener. Eleven out of ten.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Dark Matter

  • By: Michelle Paver
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Northam
  • Length: 6 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,682
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,262
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,257

January 1937. Jack Miller has just about run out of options. His shoes have worn through, he can't afford to heat his rented room in Tooting, and he longs to use his training as an specialist wireless operator instead of working in his dead-end job. When he is given the chance to join an arctic expedition, as communications expert, by a group of elite Oxbridge graduates, he brushes off his apprehensions and convinces himself to join them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Top 5 Horror

  • By Joseph on 04-04-11

Dark. And very cold. Brilliant.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-05-11

Oh boy, I listened to this while London was experiencing the Big Chill and it totally spooked me. There were times when I found it so menacing I had to switch off . The atmosphere is very convincing thanks to Jeremy Northam's superb narration. Each scene was very clear to me visually and this made the 'menace' of the story even more threatening. But there's compassion here too, the main character is genuinely likeable and you feel - and fear - for him in his solitude. I absolutely loved it.

28 of 30 people found this review helpful

The Complaints cover art
  • The Complaints

  • By: Ian Rankin
  • Narrated by: Peter Forbes
  • Length: 12 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 510
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 162
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 162

Nobody likes The Complaints - they're the cops who investigate other cops. It's where Malcolm Fox works. He's just had a result, and should be feeling good about himself, but he's a man with problems: his new job is Jamie Breck, a dirty cop but no one can prove it. As Fox takes on the job, he learns that there's more to Breck than anyone thinks.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Complaints by Ian Rankin

  • By Larry on 01-11-10

No complaints about this one.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-05-11

Ian Rankin is master of his craft and I have never been disappointed with any of his novels. I love his humour, his observation of character and his love of Edinburgh which never fails to trickle through his books. He doesn't just describe the streets or a route through them, he imparts them with character that can only come from a genuine affection for his city. The Complaints has all the Rankin ingredients, except this time the maverick gets himself a buddy.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Unexpected Guest (Dramatised)

  • By: Agatha Christie
  • Narrated by: full cast
  • Length: 58 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 17

A foggy night... a lonely country house... and a woman with a gun in her hand quietly surveying the dead body of her husband. It looked like a straightforward case of murder. Or was it? As the ghosts of an old wrong begin to emerge from the past, the case begins to look anything but straightforward... First staged at the Duchess Theatre in London in 1958, this play ran for 604 performances and is as gripping and ingenious as you would expect from the Queen of Crime.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Typical Christie!

  • By Annie on 29-05-11

Typical Christie!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-05-11

I heard this in black and white, it had that sort of sound. The only fly in the ointment was the whiny voice of the child, but I suppose that's how they were portrayed when this was dramatised. As I did, you will no doubt have the culprit pinpointed way before the end but that does not detract from the neatness of this pure Christie plot.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Anatomy of Ghosts

  • By: Andrew Taylor
  • Narrated by: John Telfer
  • Length: 13 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 161
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 57
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 59

1786, Jerusalem College, Cambridge. The ghost of Sylvia Whichcote is rumoured to be haunting Jerusalem, since disturbed fellow-commoner, Frank Oldershaw, claims to have seen the dead woman prowling the grounds. Desperate to salvage her son’s reputation, Lady Anne Oldershaw employs John Holdsworth, author of The Anatomy of Ghosts a stinging account of why ghosts are mere delusion to investigate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good book, brilliantly read.

  • By V. Hannides on 25-09-10

Atmospheric and fascinating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-05-11

I became lost in another world whilst I was listening to this. I thoroughly enjoyed the landscape of the story with its Rembrandt-esque colours and richly drawn characters. It is dark, but not without humour, and John Telfer's excellent narration does justice to this gripping story. It is slow-paced, leisurely almost, in keeping with the period; you can almost hear the clop of hooves on wet cobblestones. More than a ghost story it is a peek at the lives of those cloistered in a place of learning in the late 18th century, their superstitions, ambitions and machinations. Absorbing.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful