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Ricardo Quintas

Lisbon
  • 4
  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 10
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  • 12 Rules for Life

  • An Antidote to Chaos
  • By: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Narrated by: Jordan B. Peterson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,173
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,289
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,201

What are the most valuable things that everyone should know? Acclaimed clinical psychologist Jordan Peterson has influenced the modern understanding of personality, and now he has become one of the world's most popular public thinkers. In this book, he provides 12 profound and practical principles for how to live a meaningful life, from setting your house in order before criticising others to comparing yourself to who you were yesterday, not someone else today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not for the ideologue, or the lazy + close minded.

  • By Jake O'Connor on 18-12-18

Complex explanation of simple truths

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-19

At times the narration felt like I was listening to a precher.
More than the 12 rules, it seems the author was delivering a sermon.
Don’t get me wrong, I have enjoyed the book and took plenty of notes while reading it. But seems that the author goes to great extents just to explain simple basic truths.
The book is also very personal and auto-biographic, which is a pitty
I’ve learned a lot about the author’s family, friends and 10 different nicknames of his dog (really?)
I wanted to learn more about myself.
Had great expectations about this book and they weren’t meet.

  • Meditations of Marcus Aurelius

  • By: Marcus Aurelius
  • Narrated by: Alan Munro
  • Length: 5 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 64
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 63

Meditations is former U.S. President Bill Clinton's favorite book. This audio consists of a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor 161-180 AD, setting forth his ideas on Stoic philosophy.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Good book poorly read.

  • By Dr. Gerd Folberth on 04-03-16

Very boring narration

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-01-19

I think the ideas and concepts written on this book are interesting... but the narration is really poor and boring

  • Waking Up

  • By: Sam Harris
  • Narrated by: Sam Harris
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,297
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,117
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,099

For the millions of people who want spirituality without religion, Sam Harris’s new book is a guide to meditation as a rational spiritual practice informed by neuroscience and psychology. From bestselling author, neuroscientist, and “new atheist” Sam Harris, Waking Up is for the increasingly large numbers of people who follow no religion, but who suspect that Jesus, Buddha, Lao Tzu, Rumi, and the other saints and sages of history could not have all been epileptics, schizophrenics, or frauds.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is Important.

  • By Lucas on 15-02-15

One of the best books on Meditation

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-01-19

Forget the mambo-jumbo surrounding meditation and spirituality in general. Sam Harris delivers a compelling and very interesting book

  • On Having No Head

  • By: Douglas Edison Harding
  • Narrated by: Richard Lang
  • Length: 2 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32

'Reason and imagination and all mental chatter died down... I forgot my name, my humanness, my thingness, all that could be called me or mine. Past and future dropped away... Lighter than air, clearer than glass, altogether released from myself, I was nowhere around.' Thus Douglas Harding describes his first experience of headlessness, or no self. First published in 1961, this is a classic work which conveys the experience that mystics of all times have tried to put words to.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Measured, interesting, but fails to convince

  • By Leigh on 04-04-19

Interesting concept, but repetitive

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-01-19

Found it a little bit confusing and repetitive. During half of the book I had to speed-up the narration... it felt like it was repeating the same idea over-and-over again