LISTENER

J A Bennett

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  • 3
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  • Masters of Greek Thought: Plato, Socrates, and Aristotle

  • By: Robert C. Bartlett, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Robert C. Bartlett
  • Length: 18 hrs and 16 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 32

For more than two millennia, philosophers have grappled with life's most profound and "eternal" questions. It is easy to forget, however, that these questions about fundamental issues like justice, injustice, virtue, vice, or happiness were not always eternal. They once had to be asked for the first time.This was a step that could place the inquirer beyond the boundaries of the law. And the Athenian citizen and philosopher who took that courageous step in the 5th century B.C. was Socrates.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • I wanted to hear their philosophy

  • By Steve on 22-09-16

Great book, shame about the lecturer

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-07-15

What did you like about this audiobook?

It is a fantastic introduction to the ancient philosophers but the lecturer often stumbles over his words and in some cases even says the wrong words which I think can be rather misguiding especially when discussing philosophy, sometimes one wrong word can change the meaning of the sentence and I feel that this particular speaker doesn't sound confident enough to convey the meanings of the texts well.

How has the book increased your interest in the subject matter?

as I say the subject matter is amazing, it certainly has increased my love of ancient philosophy and lead me to read further on the subject

Does the author present information in a way that is interesting and insightful, and if so, how does he achieve this?

The speaker is rather sub-par (see above)

What did you find wrong about the narrator's performance?

He seemed very nervous and stumbled over many sentences sometimes crossing the meanings of the sentences he said. Not helpful when trying to take in important philosophical points.

Do you have any additional comments?

The rest of this series has much better narrators and they are well worth a listen, this seems to be an unfortunate anomaly.

  • Plato's Republic

  • By: The Great Courses, David Roochnik
  • Narrated by: Professor David Roochnik Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 116
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99

More than 2,000 years later, Plato's Republic remains astonishingly relevant to our everyday lives. It poses one question after another that might well have been drawn from the headlines and debates of our nation's recent history: What sort of person should rule the state? Are all citizens equal before the law? Should everyone have equal access to health care? Plato's greater inquiry, however, was into the question of defining justice itself and the reasons why a person would choose a life aligned with that virtue.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Heartily recommended if you are new to Plato

  • By Mr. P. A. Gower on 02-01-14

A must for philosophers of any level

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-07-15

What did you like most about Plato's Republic?

A must read for any lover of philosophy, it may not come up with many answers but the questions it poses are timeless. It is presented in a way that brings up all the main themes and guides the listener through parts that may be more difficult to understand. This series of lectures is fantastic value (especially when you get it with your free credits!!!!)

Who was your favorite character and why?

Socrates... obviously

What does Professor David Roochnik bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

The narrator is as you would expect of a philosophy tutor, very reserved in what he actually says, being careful to say exactly what he means so as not to throw the listener off and I think his insights into what plato actually meant in parts were very insightful.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It has opened my mind up to ways of thinking that I would have dismissed if I had not known the logical thought path that the ancients went through to come to those conclusions.

Any additional comments?

Think that sums it up.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful