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Gryfynn

Stockholm, Sweden
  • 11
  • reviews
  • 43
  • helpful votes
  • 14
  • ratings
  • Resurrection

  • Skulduggery Pleasant, Book 10
  • By: Derek Landy
  • Narrated by: Caroline Lennon
  • Length: 14 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 208
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 189
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 192

We can't say much but we can say this: Skulduggery and Valkyrie are going to team up with beloved characters from the first nine audiobooks as well as an all-new cast, including new teen co-star Omen Darkly, for an adventure that takes the story to truly global proportions...while answering questions that go right back to the beginning.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great story shame about the narrater

  • By Aine smyth on 06-07-17

The Narrator ruins this story!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-09-17

I have really enjoyed this series from the beginning right up to this book. derek Landy writes a brilliant fantasy thriller filled with funny dialog, engaging characters and plot twists designed to keep you on the edge of your seat. These books rivaled the Harry Potter series for me. However switching from a male narrator for the past 9 books to a female one for this one was a huge mistake. She doesn't seem to invision Skullduggery at all, and the past narrators have done an incredible job with the masses of characters Landy has to offer. I was really disappointed with the narration choice from the beginning right up to the end of this book.

I would definitely consider rebuying it if it was rerecorded with a narrator who can invision this story properly. The only reason I am not returning it is that it would incomplete my series.

I really hope Derek Landy had no say whatsoever in the choice of narrator, otherwise he is certainly going to lose some of my respect.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Stiletto

  • The Checquy Files, Book 2
  • By: Daniel O'Malley
  • Narrated by: Maggie Mash
  • Length: 26 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 119
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 109
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 107

The Checquy: a centuries-old covert organisation that protects the nation from supernatural threat. The Grafters: a centuries-old supernatural threat. After centuries of rivalry and bloodshed The Checquy and The Grafters are on the verge of joining forces and only one person has the supernatural skills to get the job done - Myfanwy Thomas. But as a wave of gruesome atrocities sweep London, old hatreds ignite and negotiations grind to a halt....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Shame about the narration

  • By Alice Holden on 06-01-17

Why on earth do people Switch a good narrator?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-09-17

This wasn't as good as Daniel O'Malley's first book, but it was still a wonderfully invented story full of melds between science and magic that I, as a science fiction and fantasy fan really enjoyed. I can't wait for the next series installment.

However what the publisher and or author was thinking when they switched out the narrator they had for this one is beyond me. She didn't even bother to learn that Rook Thomas pronounces her first name as Miffany. She does not use the Welsh pronunciation, unless she decided to after the first book, in which case, it's the authors fault. She also didn't bother how to pronounce 'checquy', which in the first book it is explained that it comes from french influence. It is not pronounced 'checky'.

All these little inconsistancies make me spend part of my time shouting at the narrator while trying to enjoy my book, and I could have done without this.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Salmon of Doubt

  • Hitchhiking the Galaxy One Last Time
  • By: Douglas Adams
  • Narrated by: Simon Jones, Christopher Cerf, Richard Dawkins, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 219
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 157

Rescued from his beloved Macintosh, The Salmon of Doubt provides us with the opportunity to linger and frolic one last time in the uniquely entertaining and richly informative mind of Douglas Adams. For the millions of readers who expressed their grief and shock at his untimely death, this is a treasure; his final book and our last chance to see new work from an acknowledged comic genius.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • not what i was expecting from the description

  • By Amazon Customer on 28-10-17

So long and thanks for all the words

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-09-17

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

If that friend loved the work of Douglas Adams, I absolutely would. Possibly not for the unfinished quality of the Dirk Gently story included, but more for the wonderful collection of articles and thoughts that take up the first few hours. There are some real gems in there that any fan of Adams needs to read. They contain his thoughts on a variety of subjects and every single one of them has that unmistakable Douglas Adams touch that simply no other author could have. Noone will make you look at Bach, The Beatles or exciteable dogs the way Adams does.

What did you like best about this story?

Each little snippet of thought in the collected material from the harddrive of Douglas Adams is like a friendly wave from a long lost friend. He left us far too soon and it's such a wonderful thing to have all these articles of writing together in one great audiobook. Many of these collected works had me giggling my head off in public places, just as the Hitchhiker books did. It was a real pleasure to read them all.

What does the narrators bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Simon Jones is literally the only person who I see as Arthur Dent. Not only that, but he was also one of Adams' friends and worked with him closely, so if anyone has the ability to read these things how they should be read, it's him. He does a wonderful job and I am looking forward to visiting this book again in the future.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

I wouldn't. because films that aren't done by the bbc have a history of screwing up his work. Leave it alone, damn it!

Any additional comments?

This audiobook is just all kinds of wonderful. I grew up listening to the hitchhikers radio plays and the books as well. I and my friends could quote them word for word in some places, so for me this is a wonderful treasure and I am so glad it was performed so brilliantly in audio. Thank you!

  • You Die When You Die

  • West of West, Book 1
  • By: Angus Watson
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 14 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 272
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 261
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 258

You can't change your fate - so throw yourself into battle, because you'll end the day either a hero or drinking mead in the halls of the gods. That's what Finn's tribe believe. But Finn wants to live. When his settlement is massacred by a hostile tribe, Finn plus several friends and rivals must make their escape across a brutal, unfamiliar landscape, and to survive, Finn will fight harder than he's ever fought before.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Angus! Angus! Angus!

  • By Simon on 23-06-17

I Want an Axe Now!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-17

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I already have done so. I recommended the Age of Iron trilogy mercilessly until some friends gave in and read that too. Angus Watson has built a style of fantasy all of his own. It's possibly what you would get if you put the genius of Terry Pratchett, GRRM, Bernard Cornwell and a dash of some of the other historical fiction and fantasy greats into a blender and hit start. However it's a crap analogy, because what you really would end up with is probably just an unuseable blender, but maybe you get the idea. He creates characters you just can't help but love, even if they are a little bit on the evil side. His attentiveness to historical detail is also something I appreciated as a lover of all things past.

What did you like best about this story?

Angus Watson provides a rich environment of surroundings and dialog, not to mention an incredible array of curses. A work like this needs a master of naration to really breathe life into it though. Sean Barrett's use of tone and inflection hasn't disappointed yet. The way he reads the dialog between the different characters and more importantly the way he reads their points of view as the story progresses, really added to the experience of listening to this book.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

Honestly I can't pick out a favourite at all, because I have so many and the whole book from start to finish was just brilliant. mostly I just love the language and description Watson uses. I remember early in the book the Swan Empress talks about being heavily pregnant like being a dying buffalo, and I remember saying to myself 'right on, mate'. Just too true. that's exactly how it feels like and anyone who tries to tell me how wonderful I should have felt at the time doesn't know what they are talking about.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, and I was very miffed that I couldn't. It's also a book I very much intend to read again before the second one comes out.

Any additional comments?

Probably a book you shouldn't listen to in front of younger children. My 2 year old picked up some very lovely words because I had it playing in the background while making dinner. If this is your first book by Angus Watson you definitely should also read the Iron Age trilogy. A different setting with different characters, but still the same attention to detail and the same excellent use of dialog.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Just One Damned Thing After Another

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Marty Ross
  • Narrated by: Gemma Whelan, Ben Miles, Jonathan Bailey, and others
  • Length: 7 hrs and 10 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 355
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 336
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 335

Time travel meets history in this new drama adaptation by Marty Ross. When Max, a recent ancient history graduate, is offered a mysterious job at St Mary's Historical Research Institute, she quickly comes to realise this isn't any old stuffy research library. At St Mary's the historians don't just study the past - they revisit it. What begins as an academic exploration of events, such as the Peterloo Massacre, takes a dark and dangerous turn, and the historians of St Mary's soon learn that it's not just history they're fighting....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Slightly slow start but my god does it get going!!

  • By mr on 23-05-17

Buy the Real Book Instead! don't waste your money!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-05-17

Would you try another book written by Marty Ross or narrated by the narrators?

I would absolutely buy another dramatised version of the St Mary's books, but only if it had nothing to do with Marty Ross and if it stuck more to the original idea of the original book.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

I didn't even get that far because I just didn't want to. this is not St mary's as I know and love it!

What character would you cut from Just One Damned Thing After Another?

Leon. honestly, the Leon in this dramatisation is so terribly realised that he may as well not even be there! very badly done!

Any additional comments?

If you want to get into Jodi Taylor's work, buy the book which is narrated by Zara Ramm instead. It's pure, untouched genius and it is far more worth your time and money than this load of dingo's kidneys. Leon, Peterson and Markham weren't even a shadow of themselves in this script, and too many of the actors actually sounded the same.

The Max and Leon romance was utterly terrible. all the subtle warmness of the beginning of their relationship seemed to be surgically removed from this script and what was put in its place was utterly cringe-worthy. Leon sounded like a dirty and cold-hearted old man, which is totally at odds for how he is in the book. Markham comes across as a whiner instead of a highly intelligent and resourceful smartarse and Peterson seems to be there for comic relief only.

If this is the overall quality of Audibles new dramatisations then I won't be buying another.

However please don't write off >Jodi Taylor by this performance, her work is incredible and well worth reading, but not in this format.

14 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • And the Rest Is History

  • The Chronicles of St. Mary's, Book 8
  • By: Jodi Taylor
  • Narrated by: Zara Ramm
  • Length: 10 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 936
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 880
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 872

Behind the seemingly innocuous facade of St. Mary's Institute of Historical Research, a different kind of academic work is taking place. Just don't call it time travel - these historians investigate major historical events in contemporary time. And they aren't your harmless eccentrics either; a more accurate description, as they ricochet around history, might be unintentional disaster magnets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Jodi Never Disappoints!

  • By Gryfynn on 16-04-17

Jodi Never Disappoints!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-04-17

If you could sum up And the Rest Is History in three words, what would they be?

emotional, side-splittingly funny

What did you like best about this story?

The way Jody Taylor writes a story that is both incredibly funny yet also exceptionally emotional and at times very difficult to read. Her work satisfies my need for something that both makes me laugh uncontrolably and cry like a baby.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

It's hard to choose because there are so many great ones, but the tea party in the grounds is probably my favourite. I don't want to spoil it for anyone. Just read it! Zara's naration is incredible, so that aspect of the series will not disappoint.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

without spoiling anything, I really loved the scene where Max is sitting on the stairs and suddenly she is surrounded by almost the entire staff of St Mary's while they all await Leon's return. It's just a beautiful display of solidarity, and written so well. I wish I worked there.

Any additional comments?

It's so hard to write about this book without giving anything away. Chances are if you read the previous 7 books, you will read it anyway, but if you haven't, then you really need to start from the beginning. Don't start from here as the jumping around in time will really lose you. This series is however one of the most rewarding I have ever read, so give it a try!

17 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • The Unnamable

  • By: Samuel Beckett
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 5 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 12

The Unnamable is the third novel in Beckett's trilogy, three remarkable prose works in which men of increasingly debilitating physical circumstances act, ponder, consider and rage against impermanence and the human condition. The Unnamable is without doubt the most uncompromising text and it is read here in startling fashion by Sean Barrett.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I'll go on...

  • By Gryfynn on 20-03-17

I'll go on...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-17

What made the experience of listening to The Unnamable the most enjoyable?

Before listening to this I would have said that Sean barrett is a very good narrator. After listening to this however, I believe he is the best. This is a very heavy going piece of literature, yet he reads this text with a huge range of emotions. One minute he seems to cry out in despair with the agony of his strange existance while the next injecting the story with a little light-hearted amusement, passing by resignation, anger and exhaustion along the way. Beckett's work is not easy to interpret, however I don't believe I have heard it better done than here.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Unnamable?

The last few lines of the text are spellbinding to listen too. It almost feels like the entire text builds up to just those last few lines. All I was able to do after hearing them was simply sit and gaze out of the window. I had no words for how I felt.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

isn't that almost the same question? well, my answer is as above, anyway. Given the nature of the text, it's impossible really to talk about it in terms of scenes or events.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It made me do both. I have never been so moved by an audiobook before. It really was an astounding listening experience. All three books in the Beckett trilogy were a revelation to me, but certain lines in this book simply left me stunned. It is terribly difficult to put it into words.

Any additional comments?

I almost feel that this book is much better to listen to rather than read. I don't think I would have stuck with it otherwise. Not only is it worth reading for Beckett's outlook on the human condition, but it's honestly a work of auditry art in its delivery. I would however not recommend reading it without having read the first two books in the Beckett trilogy to start with.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Elizabeth's Legacy

  • Royal Institute of Magic, Book 1
  • By: Victor Kloss
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14

Two years after his parents' sudden disappearance, Ben Greenwood stumbles upon a cryptic letter that could shed some light on their whereabouts. But before he can track them down, he'll need to find the mysterious organization that sent the letter: The Royal Institute of Magic. To succeed, Ben will have to navigate a land filled with fantastic creatures and spellshooters, where magic can be bought and sold, to unravel an ancient family secret that could hold the key to defeating an evil the Institute has been fighting for the last 500 years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • definitely read this!

  • By Amazon Customer on 02-06-18

A Warm and Wonderful Story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-17

Would you consider the audio edition of Elizabeth's Legacy to be better than the print version?

Don't you know the Audio version is always better than the print version? I am blind, so partial always to audio, but I think Peter Kenny's voice is much better than anything my brain could come up with.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Both Ben and Charlie have their good points and both are well written characters. I love them both for different reasons.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

I have to say I really love how the author set the scene for this book, beginning with one of Ben's descendents. The mystery and magesty of the Royal Institute is quite gripping and I love the idea of a brave commoner daring to tread the halls of the mighty and noble.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I laughed a lot. It really gave me the same kind of warm feeling as the Harry Potter series still gives me every time I do a reread. Certainly if that series is one of your favourites then you will really love this book.

Any additional comments?

Peter Kenny does a fantastic job narrating this book, as he does with so many others. It was a real joy to listen to and fantastic for anyone looking for a more light-hearted read.

  • Tales My Grandcat Told Me

  • A collection of folk stories about cats from around the world
  • By: Nick McCarty
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 1 hr and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

A collection of folk stories about cats from around the world. There are many folk tales involving cats from every corner of the world. This collection offers 8 of them, some gentle, some amusing, some very dark.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Must for Cat Lovers

  • By Gryfynn on 20-03-17

A Must for Cat Lovers

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-17

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

If they love cats, absolutely. This is like the audible equivalent to those wonderful comical books full of great and amusing cat pictures, but at the same time, much more classy and worth your money.

What did you like best about this story?

Sean Barrett's narration, of course. Like everything else he reads, he brings these beautiful and magical stories to life, just the way he does when he's reading a psychological thriller or work of high fantasy. I would have bought the book otherwise because CATS! however his narration made it a necessity.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

The story of The Boy Who Drew Cats was haunting and definitely not the kind of cat story I had expected, but nonetheless I loved it. the image of the little boy drawing cats in an abandoned Japanese temple was rather erie.

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

There are lots of little well-placed humourous little remarks and comments throughout the stories, which made me laugh on a number of occasions. It was very well done, and really I could imagine my own cat telling these stories if he hadn't been desexed years ago so he had the opportunity to become a grandcat.

Any additional comments?

If you're a cat lover, you need this book! you could enjoy it on your own or even with your children.

  • Molloy

  • By: Samuel Beckett
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett, Dermot Crowley
  • Length: 8 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38

Written initially in French, later translated by the author into English, Molloy is the first book in Dublin-born Samuel Beckett's trilogy. It was published shortly after WWII and marked a new, mature writing style, which was to dominate the remainder of his working life. Molloy is less a novel than a set of two monologues narrated by Molloy and his pursuer, Moran.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Circles and Straight Lines

  • By Antti on 16-10-15

Hard Going, But Worth It

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-02-17

What made the experience of listening to Molloy the most enjoyable?

I feel beckett's work lends itself more to being heard with the ears than being read with the eyes. Both Narrators were incredibly expressive, which must have been difficult, since Beckett doesn't give much to work with by way of characterising. So much is left to the listeners interpretation.

Who was your favorite character and why?

That this question is here shows that this little review sheet was not made especially for this book. However without spoiling anything I will say Moran from the second half of the book. It's a much more difficult part to read, and the story becomes rather interesting at that point.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

the part of the book where molloy agonises over the problem of too many 'sucking stones'. There's beckett for you right there. massive amounts of time spent on a tedious problem that should be a non-event - ie the problem of having too many stones against too few pockets. It made me laugh and despair all at once.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Honestly, I wouldn't. this wouldn't lend itself to film.

Any additional comments?

I will be honest. Samuel Beckett's work is dificult going, but these wonderful audio versions make it just that little bit easier. It's well worth the effort if you're willing to stick with it though for Beckett's commentary on the human condition.

Well done Naxos!