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N. Robinson

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  • Shadows and Teeth

  • Ten Terrifying Tales of Horror and Suspense
  • By: Antonio Simon Jr., Trevor Boelter, Mia Bravo, and others
  • Narrated by: Wyatt S. Gray
  • Length: 8 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3

Prepare for extreme horror. This collection of 10 stories features a range of international talent: award-winning authors, masters of horror, rising stars, and fresh new voices in the genre. Take care as you reach into these dark places, for the things here bite, and you may withdraw a hand short a few fingers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Gory Gory Fun

  • By N. Robinson on 25-08-17

Gory Gory Fun

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-08-17



This unique collection of stories features a range of international talent: award-winning authors, masters of horror, rising stars, and fresh new voices in the genre. Take care as you reach into these dark places, for the things here bite, and you may withdraw a hand short of a few fingers.


Antonio Simon Jr’s opener Water, Ice and Vice is a Twilight Zone-esque cautionary tale about being careful what you wish for, as two college students discover a fridge that offers the possibility of fulfilling any vice.
Routine By Mia Bravo is a stand out story as a man’s OCD spirals out of control with bloody consequences. Despite the obvious reasoning for his escalating condition, I enjoyed his descent into madness.
The Pied Piper’s Appetite by Rich Phelan follows the tale of a competitive eater whose gluttonous appetites go further than just food. A likeable tale that borders on noir and surprises throughout as things get more and more messed up and a sinister agenda comes to light.

  • Maldicion

  • By: Daniel Marc Chant
  • Narrated by: Nigel Peever
  • Length: 4 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

Dexter LeGrasse thought he was lucky to be alive. He was wrong. The only survivor of a plane crash over the Atlantic, he finds himself washed up on an uninhabited island. Dazed, dehydrated and desperate to escape, he will have to use all his wits just to stay alive in a strange and unforgiving environment. But when he discovers an ancient ruin, he unwittingly unleashes an unstoppable evil and his nightmare truly begins.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Maldicion

  • By Deedra on 30-03-18

You're not alone.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-08-17

Maldicion by Daniel Marc Chant narrated by Nigel Peever

Dexter LeGrasse thought he was lucky to be alive.
He was wrong.
The only survivor of a plane crash over the Atlantic, he finds himself washed up on an uninhabited island. Dazed, dehydrated and desperate to escape, he will have to use all his wits just to stay alive in a strange and unforgiving environment. But when he discovers an ancient ruin, he unwittingly unleashes an unstoppable evil and his nightmare truly begins.
Primal, merciless and fuelled by a burning hatred, the creature has a hunger that must be appeased. It hunts Dexter wherever he goes, driving him to the edge of his own sanity, and with time running out and no place left to hide it's escape... ...or die.

You find yourself marooned on an island after a devastating plane crash. Waiting for help to arrive, you decide to explore the island, finding a source of water and some sparse supplies of food. You might be able to survive until a rescue party finds you. Exploring deeper, you find evidence of primitive civilisation.
You are alone.
But you are not alone.

I thoroughly enjoyed Maldicion. It’s a simple story of a man alone on an island facing off against an ancient evil that is much bigger and stronger than he, with nothing but the contents of a few suitcases and his wits to fight it with.
At times, it feels like a choose your own survival adventure but without the choices (not a bad thing, because I used to love them) as it moves from dilemma to dilemma, although some of the discoveries feel a little convenient in order to advance the plot, the story is tight and keeps things interesting, which is ideal for the length.
The narration by Nigel Peevers is fantastic and his dramatically rising tones are suited for this story pefectly
Mixing up The Twilight Zone, parts of Robinson Crusoe, a dash of LOST, and a slice of Lovecraft mythos, Maldicion is a short read of creeping terror, that plunges the main character into a waking nightmare that they can’t wake up from.

4/5

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Blood Meridian

  • Or the Evening Redness in the West
  • By: Cormac McCarthy
  • Narrated by: Richard Poe
  • Length: 13 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 516
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 405
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 402

Author of the National Book Award-winning All the Pretty Horses, Cormac McCarthy is one of the most provocative American stylists to emerge in the last century. The striking novel Blood Meridian offers an unflinching narrative of the brutality that accompanied the push west on the 1850s Texas frontier.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Visionary, violent, yet redemptive. A masterpiece.

  • By Peter Kettle on 07-04-13

brutal and brilliant. apocalyptic and awesome.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-01-17

brutal and brilliant apocalyptic and awesome dangerous and poetic funny and tragic. the judge is a fantastic literary character.

  • Ready Player One

  • By: Ernest Cline
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,728
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 18,588
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,530

It's the year 2044, and the real world has become an ugly place.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This Book Changed My Life 💙 New Hobbies Found 💜

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-04-18

Game over man.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-11-16

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline, narrated by Will Wheaton

“It's the year 2044, and the real world has become an ugly place. We're out of oil. We've wrecked the climate. Famine, poverty, and disease are widespread.

Like most of humanity, Wade Watts escapes this depressing reality by spending his waking hours jacked into the OASIS, a sprawling virtual utopia where you can be anything you want to be, where you can live and play and fall in love on any of ten thousand planets. And like most of humanity, Wade is obsessed by the ultimate lottery ticket that lies concealed within this alternate reality: OASIS founder James Halliday, who dies with no heir, has promised that control of the OASIS - and his massive fortune - will go to the person who can solve the riddles he has left scattered throughout his creation.”

I’m a bit late logging on to the Ready Player One bandwagon, but I wanted to get in there before the film comes out. So here it goes.
Imagine if The Matrix was a done as homage to all things 80’s. That’s Ready Player One. Set in a not so bright future, where any right-minded person spends every waking hour logged into the OASIS; a multi player, interconnected, open universe game built on a foundation of geeky 80’s lore, from where the users create their own worlds and characters, completing quests to achieve XP and earn credits. Sounds easy, right.
But disaster afoot, the creator of the OASIS, James Halliday, dies and leaves instructions in his will that the ownership of the OASIS be transferred to whoever finds his Easter Egg, which of course he’s hidden within the virtual world. As expected, the majority of planet set off a virtual quest to snag the keys to the Halliday kingdom. But the quests are never easy. In fact, they’re insane.

Part Matrix, part Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, with enough 80’s references sprinkled throughout to appease the geekiest of geeks, I loved this with every gigabyte of my being. I’m a child of the 80’s and I didn’t get half of the references in this, but it didn’t matter (although, I am old enough to own a Commodore 64). I became caught up in the sheer enthusiasm for the source material. Clines, clearly has done his research and has the knowledge to hand in which to connect the dots and creating a labyrinth like plot that draws the reader in with it’s pure giddiness. Thoroughly recommended to fans of anything and everything, there’s something for everybody in this.
I have to mention Will Wheaton’s fantastic delivery with his narration. Absolutely faultless, and you can really tell that he cares about the source material, his boundless enthusiasm adds another dimension to proceedings, helping bring this tale to life. This isn’t just a story about geeks and gamers, it’s for geeks and gamer, and anyone else that likes a bloody good thriller, with definite messages about friendship, love, and what state we’re leaving the planet in for the next generation. It struck another chord with me about online friendships. The vast majority of humans I consider friends live away from me. In this digital world, it’s easier to make friends online than it is in the real world. Many prefer this as we can pick and choose what we reveal to others. Some say that the online us isn’t the real us at all, others say it’s more than the real us, as often it’s pure personality when we’re online, nothing but soul, and the fake one is who we force ourselves to be. There’s a lot of truth in that.
If you only read one cyberpunk thriller with hard drive full of heart, I implore to have a go on Ready Player One.
5/5

  • Zero Lives Remaining

  • By: Adam Cesare
  • Narrated by: Joe Hempel
  • Length: 2 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3

Robby Asaro is dead. And alive. He's a ghost in the machine, keeping a watchful eye on the arcade where he lost his life two decades before. And the afterlife is good. The best thing ever to have happened to him. But when the conscious electric current formerly known as Robby Asaro makes a decision to protect one of his favorite patrons, Tiffany Park, from a bully, he sets loose a series of violent supernatural events that can't be stopped.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Arcade fires. Game over man

  • By N. Robinson on 15-06-16

Arcade fires. Game over man

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-06-16

What did you like most about Zero Lives Remaining?

The short, punchy story.

Have you listened to any of Joe Hempel’s other performances? How does this one compare?

He's a fantastic reader.

Any additional comments?



Robby Asaro is dead.

And alive.


There’s something strange in the neighbourhood… notably the Fun Cave, a sticky floored arcade filled with nostalgic games and the misfits that play them. Several years after a very grisly death at the property, maintenance man and general dogsbody, Dan Boden discovers a strange substance oozing from the circuit boards of Ms. Pac Man. Like any good horror, discovering a sticky discharge in some dark crevice is usually the harbinger for some terrible monster. And so it begins.
With an equal measure of geeky nostalgia and blood drenched fury, Cesare weaves the tale of one night trapped in a gaming arcade as a vengeful spirit takes hold of the electronics in a Maximum Overdrive type fashion. Burnings, electrocutions and a couple of folk get maimed in inventive fashions; Cesare brings death in new and exciting ways as victims get in the way of his pulsing poltergeist, which seems intent on destroying everybody in sight. In a short space of time, he creates a wonderful sense of pathos with a group of damaged characters, slightly befuddled with society, as they move from being comfortably drenched in geek sweat and the stench of burger grease, to the arterial spray of blood and hot guts.
I recently experienced Joe Hempel’s awesome telling of Family Business by Brett Williams and adored his voice work and clear delivery. He succeeds again in this story, making each character his own with a triumphant versatility, bringing definite individuals to life with the true craft of a professional.
Zero Lives Remaining plays out like a 80’s video nasty, offing characters off one by one (often in two), with pocketful of nostalgic references to assorted fandoms and enough humour to stop it from getting too dark. If you want some cheesy, though well thought out horror, drop a few coins in this way.
Game over man. Game over.
5/5

  • Over the Top and Back

  • The Autobiography
  • By: Tom Jones
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Pryce
  • Length: 12 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 264
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 244
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 240

In a career that has spanned six decades, Sir Tom Jones has performed with almost every major recording artist, from Jerry Lee Lewis, Elvis and Sinatra to Robbie Williams, Van Morrison and Jessie J, across every imaginable genre, from rock and pop to country, blues and soul. The one constant throughout has been his unique musical gift and unmistakable voice.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Knickers Moment.

  • By Ian on 02-04-16

Tom Fxxxing Jones

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-06-16


a fantastic insight into his life definitely recommended.
Funny and moving.
The Elvis story had me crying.

  • High Moor 2: Moonstruck

  • By: Graeme Reynolds
  • Narrated by: Chris Barnes
  • Length: 7 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24

The people of High Moor are united in horror at the latest tragedy to befall their small town. As dawn breaks, the town is left to count the cost and mourn its dead, while breathing a collective sigh of relief. John Simpson, the apparent perpetrator of the horrific murders, is in police custody. The nightmare is over. Isn't it? Detective Inspector Phil Fletcher and his partner, Constable Olivia Garner, have started to uncover some unsettling evidence during their investigations of John Simpson's past - evidence that supports his impossible claims: that he is a werewolf....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fur will fly

  • By N. Robinson on 08-02-16

Fur will fly

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-16

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Both simultaneously .

Any additional comments?

High Moor/High Moor 2: Moon Struck/High Moor 3: Blood Moon by Graeme Reynolds
Audiobook narrated by Chris Barnes

When John Simpson hears of a bizarre animal attack in his old home town of High Moor, it stirs memories of a long forgotten horror. John knows the truth. A werewolf stalks the town once more, and on the night of the next full moon, the killing will begin again. He should know. He survived a werewolf attack in 1986, during the worst year of his life.

It’s 1986 and the town is gripped in terror after the mutilated corpse of a young boy is found in the woods. When Sergeant Steven Wilkinson begins an investigation, with the help of a specialist hunter, he soon realises that this is no ordinary animal attack. Werewolves are real, and the trail of bodies is just beginning, with young John and his friends smack in the middle of it…

With a trilogy of books already released, it seemed to make sense to review all three in one go, because the fact is, I found after experiencing the first, you’ll be dying to get stuck into the rest. I could leave the review at that, and maybe you’ll take my word for it. But what if you don’t?
Let’s talk werewolves. When done right, the embodiment of pure, carnal beast is a formidable horror staple. Reynolds nails the lore from the first bite to the last bullet.
High Moor is thrill ride from start to finish, harking back to 80’s action horror classics whilst maintaining a firm sense of much loved nostalgia. With a group of friends facing off against a seemingly invincible terror, there’s a definite sense of a childhood betrayed, a trope Stephen King has used successfully in several of his Kids vs Monsters stories, and in this, Reynolds brilliantly portrays a struggling northern town to perfection.
Another point I loved is that Reynolds could’ve quite easily ended the novel at several points, and as a reader, I would have been happy. But the action keeps coming, taking the story much further than I ever expected.
Humorous and at times utterly shocking, High Moor sets the scene, with a group of characters you’ll come to love, and love to hate.
Moon Struck takes the story to the next level and introduces a larger pack of werewolves, delving into group politics and further into their history, which makes fascinating reading as we head deeper into Reynolds’ universe. Whilst Moonstruck moves at a slower pace, it soon picks up, especially with the inclusion of a psychopathic werewolf called Connie, who steals the show, literally chewing the scenery (and quite often, characters) with maniacal, blood squirting glee.
Blood Moon completes the saga (for the time being) with an all-out war of werewolves vs werewolves vs humans as species eradication and infighting is rife. This werewolf holocaust is touching at times, as Reynolds succeeds in humanising the monster, creating more than just a community, but families as well, struggling as their lives are turned upside down
But with a story about tooth and claws, it can only end one way; blood, and lots of it. Graeme Reynolds delivers it by the bucket load, satisfying even the sickest of gore lovers. My one gripe is the woefully underused idea of a werewolf super soldier, but there’s always room for another sequel.
Also, hats off again to Chris Barnes for his flawless performance, bringing depths to characters by creating individual voices for each. His ear for accents is uncanny, and hearing him flit between West Country lilt and thick Russian is a joy to behold, keeping me gripped for many a long and lonely drive.
All in all, High Moor is an exhilarating thrill ride of action horror that never threatens to give up the pace, and the entire trilogy is thoroughly recommended, whether it’s in book form or audiobook.
5/5



1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • High Moor 3: Blood Moon

  • By: Graeme Reynolds
  • Narrated by: Chris Barnes
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11

The war has begun...As the humans make their move against the werewolf threat in their midst, and civil war threatens to break the pack apart, John and Marie struggle to free the only person who can unite the werewolf factions against their common enemy: Marie's brother, Michael. However, their efforts may be for nothing. As tensions mount, the Moonborn prepare to combat the human aggression with an assault of their own; an attack that could spell doom for both man and werewolf alike.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic werewolf trilogy

  • By Kerry N. on 23-12-15

Fangtastic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-16

Have you listened to any of Chris Barnes’s other performances? How does this one compare?

All equally good performances.

Any additional comments?

High Moor/High Moor 2: Moon Struck/High Moor 3: Blood Moon by Graeme Reynolds
Audiobook narrated by Chris Barnes

When John Simpson hears of a bizarre animal attack in his old home town of High Moor, it stirs memories of a long forgotten horror. John knows the truth. A werewolf stalks the town once more, and on the night of the next full moon, the killing will begin again. He should know. He survived a werewolf attack in 1986, during the worst year of his life.

It’s 1986 and the town is gripped in terror after the mutilated corpse of a young boy is found in the woods. When Sergeant Steven Wilkinson begins an investigation, with the help of a specialist hunter, he soon realises that this is no ordinary animal attack. Werewolves are real, and the trail of bodies is just beginning, with young John and his friends smack in the middle of it…

With a trilogy of books already released, it seemed to make sense to review all three in one go, because the fact is, I found after experiencing the first, you’ll be dying to get stuck into the rest. I could leave the review at that, and maybe you’ll take my word for it. But what if you don’t?
Let’s talk werewolves. When done right, the embodiment of pure, carnal beast is a formidable horror staple. Reynolds nails the lore from the first bite to the last bullet.
High Moor is thrill ride from start to finish, harking back to 80’s action horror classics whilst maintaining a firm sense of much loved nostalgia. With a group of friends facing off against a seemingly invincible terror, there’s a definite sense of a childhood betrayed, a trope Stephen King has used successfully in several of his Kids vs Monsters stories, and in this, Reynolds brilliantly portrays a struggling northern town to perfection.
Another point I loved is that Reynolds could’ve quite easily ended the novel at several points, and as a reader, I would have been happy. But the action keeps coming, taking the story much further than I ever expected.
Humorous and at times utterly shocking, High Moor sets the scene, with a group of characters you’ll come to love, and love to hate.
Moon Struck takes the story to the next level and introduces a larger pack of werewolves, delving into group politics and further into their history, which makes fascinating reading as we head deeper into Reynolds’ universe. Whilst Moonstruck moves at a slower pace, it soon picks up, especially with the inclusion of a psychopathic werewolf called Connie, who steals the show, literally chewing the scenery (and quite often, characters) with maniacal, blood squirting glee.
Blood Moon completes the saga (for the time being) with an all-out war of werewolves vs werewolves vs humans as species eradication and infighting is rife. This werewolf holocaust is touching at times, as Reynolds succeeds in humanising the monster, creating more than just a community, but families as well, struggling as their lives are turned upside down
But with a story about tooth and claws, it can only end one way; blood, and lots of it. Graeme Reynolds delivers it by the bucket load, satisfying even the sickest of gore lovers. My one gripe is the woefully underused idea of a werewolf super soldier, but there’s always room for another sequel.
Also, hats off again to Chris Barnes for his flawless performance, bringing depths to characters by creating individual voices for each. His ear for accents is uncanny, and hearing him flit between West Country lilt and thick Russian is a joy to behold, keeping me gripped for many a long and lonely drive.
All in all, High Moor is an exhilarating thrill ride of action horror that never threatens to give up the pace, and the entire trilogy is thoroughly recommended, whether it’s in book form or audiobook.
5/5



1 of 1 people found this review helpful

High Moor cover art
  • High Moor

  • By: Graeme Reynolds
  • Narrated by: Chris Barnes
  • Length: 7 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35

When John Simpson hears of a bizarre animal attack in his old home town of High Moor, it stirs memories of a long forgotten horror. John knows the truth. A werewolf stalks the town once more, and on the night of the next full moon, the killing will begin again. He should know. He survived a werewolf attack in 1986, during the worst year of his life. It’s 1986 and the town is gripped in terror after the mutilated corpse of a young boy is found in the woods.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A story to get your teeth stuck into.

  • By James on 22-10-13

GRRRRRRREEEEEAAAATTT!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-16

Would you consider the audio edition of High Moor to be better than the print version?

I enjoyed it for what it was. A fantastically told story.

What did you like best about this story?

The humour.

Which character – as performed by Chris Barnes – was your favourite?

Schnieder.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The friendships

Any additional comments?

High Moor/High Moor 2: Moon Struck/High Moor 3: Blood Moon by Graeme Reynolds
Audiobook narrated by Chris Barnes

When John Simpson hears of a bizarre animal attack in his old home town of High Moor, it stirs memories of a long forgotten horror. John knows the truth. A werewolf stalks the town once more, and on the night of the next full moon, the killing will begin again. He should know. He survived a werewolf attack in 1986, during the worst year of his life.

It’s 1986 and the town is gripped in terror after the mutilated corpse of a young boy is found in the woods. When Sergeant Steven Wilkinson begins an investigation, with the help of a specialist hunter, he soon realises that this is no ordinary animal attack. Werewolves are real, and the trail of bodies is just beginning, with young John and his friends smack in the middle of it…

With a trilogy of books already released, it seemed to make sense to review all three in one go, because the fact is, I found after experiencing the first, you’ll be dying to get stuck into the rest. I could leave the review at that, and maybe you’ll take my word for it. But what if you don’t?
Let’s talk werewolves. When done right, the embodiment of pure, carnal beast is a formidable horror staple. Reynolds nails the lore from the first bite to the last bullet.
High Moor is thrill ride from start to finish, harking back to 80’s action horror classics whilst maintaining a firm sense of much loved nostalgia. With a group of friends facing off against a seemingly invincible terror, there’s a definite sense of a childhood betrayed, a trope Stephen King has used successfully in several of his Kids vs Monsters stories, and in this, Reynolds brilliantly portrays a struggling northern town to perfection.
Another point I loved is that Reynolds could’ve quite easily ended the novel at several points, and as a reader, I would have been happy. But the action keeps coming, taking the story much further than I ever expected.
Humorous and at times utterly shocking, High Moor sets the scene, with a group of characters you’ll come to love, and love to hate.
Moon Struck takes the story to the next level and introduces a larger pack of werewolves, delving into group politics and further into their history, which makes fascinating reading as we head deeper into Reynolds’ universe. Whilst Moonstruck moves at a slower pace, it soon picks up, especially with the inclusion of a psychopathic werewolf called Connie, who steals the show, literally chewing the scenery (and quite often, characters) with maniacal, blood squirting glee.
Blood Moon completes the saga (for the time being) with an all-out war of werewolves vs werewolves vs humans as species eradication and infighting is rife. This werewolf holocaust is touching at times, as Reynolds succeeds in humanising the monster, creating more than just a community, but families as well, struggling as their lives are turned upside down
But with a story about tooth and claws, it can only end one way; blood, and lots of it. Graeme Reynolds delivers it by the bucket load, satisfying even the sickest of gore lovers. My one gripe is the woefully underused idea of a werewolf super soldier, but there’s always room for another sequel.
Also, hats off again to Chris Barnes for his flawless performance, bringing depths to characters by creating individual voices for each. His ear for accents is uncanny, and hearing him flit between West Country lilt and thick Russian is a joy to behold, keeping me gripped for many a long and lonely drive.
All in all, High Moor is an exhilarating thrill ride of action horror that never threatens to give up the pace, and the entire trilogy is thoroughly recommended, whether it’s in book form or audiobook.
5/5



1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • GodBomb!

  • By: Kit Power
  • Narrated by: Chris Barnes
  • Length: 5 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5

It's 1995 in North Devon, England. There's a born-again revival meeting in a public building; the usual mix of the faithful, the curious, and the desperate. And one other - an atheist suicide bomber. He's angry. He wants answers. And if God doesn't come and talk to him personally, he's going to kill everyone in the building....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • "He couldn't care less about any of this"

  • By Norma Miles on 10-11-16

Boom...drops God Bomb

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-01-16

Where does GodBomb! rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

One of the best as it was the first. I'm converted.

What was one of the most memorable moments of GodBomb!?

The numerous twists.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

The opening.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

"Hello, Is God there?"

1 of 1 people found this review helpful