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Lord Peridot

Cornwall, UK
  • 150
  • reviews
  • 104
  • helpful votes
  • 170
  • ratings
  • 9/11: Ten Years of Deception

  • By: David Ray Griffin, Richard Gage, David Chandler, and others
  • Narrated by: full cast
  • Length: 4 hrs and 27 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

Over a decade has passed since the World Trade Center attacks of September 11, 2001, and yet there are still many unanswered questions surrounding that fateful day, which changed a nation forever. Conspiracy theories attribute the planning and execution of the attacks to two parties other than Al-Qaeda and claim there was advance knowledge of the attacks amongst high-level government and military officials.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Valuable set of lectures

  • By Lord Peridot on 29-03-19

Valuable set of lectures

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-03-19

This book is a useful set of audio only lectures made by leading members of the AE911Truth campaign. Each lecture is about 10 to 20 minutes long dealing with various subjects like thermite, eye-witness testimony, WTC building 7 and so on. If you are not already familiar with these subjects then would be a good idea to watch their online video first called Explosive Evidence.

  • The Looming Tower

  • Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11
  • By: Lawrence Wright
  • Narrated by: Lawrence Wright
  • Length: 16 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 205
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 186
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 185

A sweeping narrative history of the events leading to 9/11, a groundbreaking look at the people and ideas, the terrorist plans and the Western intelligence failures that culminated in the assault on America. Lawrence Wright's remarkable book is based on five years of research and hundreds of interviews that he conducted in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sudan, England, France, Germany, Spain, and the United States.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Astounding

  • By HashTag on 03-09-18

Long and detailed and a bit confusing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-03-19

There's a lot of interesting material in this book. The author has first hand experience of Middle East trouble spots and writes about Muslims and Arabs sympathetically. However, I found the book quite confusing and even tedious at times. Wright is a skilled scriptwriter so you would imagine that that wouldnt have been a problem. But it is, not least because there are many characters involved in his narrative, most of which the average person has never heard of. Then they have various friends & relations. So you lose track of who is who & how they relate to each other.

In view of the continued topicality of the 9/11 attacks, its worth pointing out that Wright is on the record as regarding the attacks as a straightforward act of Al Quaeda terrorism. And that there are no reasonable grounds for suspicion of the official story. Its also clear that he has quite strong links with the CIA as he likes to tell a story in which the CIA asked him how they should deal with Bin Laden once they had captured him. In publicly available talks made by him in recent years these points are clearly made. BTW the narrator sounds a bit like Kevin Costner, speaking in a comfortable drawl.

  • Voodoo Histories

  • The Role of the Conspiracy Theory in Shaping Modern History
  • By: David Aaronovitch
  • Narrated by: James Langton
  • Length: 14 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 192
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 106
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 105

Our age is obsessed by the idea of conspiracy. We see it everywhere - from Pearl Harbor to 9/11, from the assassination of Kennedy to the death of Diana. In this age of terrorism we live in, the role of conspiracy is a serious one - one that can fuel radical or fringe elements to violence. For award-winning journalist David Aaronovitch, there came a time when he started to see a pattern among these inflammatory theories.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Better in author's voice

  • By Lesley on 08-08-10

True Colours

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-03-19

Seems like a perfectly well read audiobook to me. Don't understand why some people are complaining about the narrator. As for the author, I've always enjoyed Aaronovitch's program on BBC radio 4, The Briefing Room. And reading this book I was favourably impressed until one or two of the later chapters, in particular his complete dismissal of concerns about the 9/11 debacle as a lot of conspiracy nonsense. No one who has looked at the evidence, even in passing, can reasonably say that.

But it seems that Aaronovitch has an agenda. As a supporter of the 2003 Iraq war, even in retrospect, and a believer in the Project for a New American Century, its easy to imagine that this book was actually written as a propaganda piece. He is perhaps lending his skills to the cause of obscuring the truth, thus making himself a conspiracy practitioner, one up from being a mere theorist.

This man was born into a staunch USSR supporting, Communist family, something he has written about sympathetically. So how come he has now become a right wing idealogue who supports American Imperialism? The one thing these two political systems have in common is the principle of sweeping, monolithic government power, complete with all the apparatus of state control & intrusive surveillance. That could be the answer. Or maybe its something else.

  • Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole

  • Extraordinary Journeys into the Human Brain
  • By: Dr. Allan Ropper
  • Narrated by: Paul Boehmer
  • Length: 9 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33

What is it like to try to heal the body when the mind is under attack? In this gripping and illuminating audiobook, Dr Allan Ropper reveals the extraordinary stories behind some of the life-altering afflictions that he and his staff are confronted with at the Neurology Unit of Harvard's Brigham and Women's Hospital.Neurologists diagnose and treat serious illnesses of the brain by combining the hard science of medical knowledge with the art of intuitive reasoning.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • fascinating

  • By Ms R Brunner on 18-06-16

Mysteries of the Mind

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-03-19

This is an excellent book and very well read by Paul Boehmer. You can't help thinking that its actually the Doctor who wrote the book who is doing the reading, There are several books available on this subject and I'm glad I chose this one. Its an easy listen without being in anyway patronising to the listener. Though I would have appreciated one chapter which gave a sort of 101 lecture on how neurologists see their subject. They seem to inhabit the boundary area between normal medicine and psychiatry. And its a strange and slightly disturbing world indeed. The author who is a leading American neurologist, discusses the case histories of various patients, giving a brief sketch of who they are and what they do in normal life. So the whole discourse is grounded in an easily understood reality, despite the strange afflictions that his patients suffer from. And there is indeed a lot of suffering here. But the author is clearly a sympathetic man who sees his job as helping people to cope with their situation, especially since there is often no practical cure. The only patient who's true identity is revealed is the actor Michael J Fox who happened to be referred to Dr. Ropper.

  • It Can't Happen Here

  • By: Sinclair Lewis
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 14 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71

Doremus Jessup, a newspaper editor, is dismayed to find that many of the people he knows support presidential candidate Berzelius Windrip. The suspiciously fascist Windrip is offering to save the nation from sex, crime, welfare cheats, and a liberal press. But after Windrip wins the election, dissent soon becomes dangerous for Jessup. Windrip forcibly gains control of Congress and the Supreme Court and, with the aid of his personal paramilitary storm troopers, turns the United States into a totalitarian state.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A story for our times

  • By Patrick on 20-07-16

Sinclair Lewis - America's George Orwell

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-02-19

Brilliant reading by Grover Gardner of this classic book. I presume this really is the author at his best as its hard to imagine a better or more prescient work of cautionary fiction. Lewis takes the event of fascist Europe in the early 1930's and imagines how such events might unfold in the USA. His characters, the descriptive passages, and the unfolding of the narrative are masterful. And anyone who gives the name Doremus Jessop to the most important and heroic character in the book must have had a pretty sharp sense of humour. I don't know if Sinclair Lewis was known as America's answer to George Orwell but I can see why that would be so appropriate. I was indeed reminded of Orwell by the ease with which the author captures one's attention and leads you effortlessly through to the end.

  • Why We Get The Wrong Politicians

  • By: Isabel Hardman
  • Narrated by: Isabel Hardman
  • Length: 9 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 111
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 109

Politicians are consistently voted the least trusted professional group by the UK public. They've recently become embroiled in scandals concerning sexual harassment and expenses. Every year, they introduce new legislation that doesn't do what it sets out to achieve - often with terrible financial and human costs. But, with some notable exceptions, they are decent, hardworking people doing a hugely difficult and demanding job. In this searching examination of our political class, award-winning journalist Isabel Hardman tries to square this circle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Practical remedies for a broken system.

  • By Paul Lillie on 26-09-18

Parliament Revealed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-02-19

This is an excellent book by the journalist Isabel Hardman. She clearly knows what she is talking about and writes in a sympathetic, constructive and generally light-hearted manner about the lives of MPs, for better or worse. The implications of her book, if not its underlying thesis, is that MP's deserve a better time of it if we want to attract the very best people to help run the country, something that is not really happening at the moment. She also contributes ideas about making ministers more accountable for their actions after the event, believing that this would help concentrate their minds on what is really best for the country, rather than what is best for their party and their own advancement within it. The book is full of interesting anecdotes and sharp but affectionate sketches of the MPs and their constituents. Well read by the author herself who as a TV & radio reporter is used to speaking clearly & well. Only tiny criticism I have is that she refers to the book as an audiobook, whereas it was presumably written as an ordinary book first, as in for instance, "what I am saying in this audiobook is that". Somehow it doesn't sound right. But as I said, its a tiny criticism.

  • The History of Classical Music

  • By: Richard Fawkes
  • Narrated by: Robert Powell
  • Length: 5 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23

From Gregorian Chant to Henryk Gorecki, the first living classical composer to get into the pop album charts, here is the fascinating story of over a thousand years of Western classical music and the composers who have sought to express in music the deepest of human feelings and emotions. Polyphony, sonata form, serial music - many musical expressions are also explained - with the text illustrated by performances from some of the most highly praised recordings of recent years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very pleasant way to read a book !

  • By Kindle Customer on 23-12-12

Good introduction to world of western muisc - sacred and classical

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-02-19

This is a short but well constructed introduction to western classical music, starting with its origins as sacred chanting. There are helpful excerpts of music throughout the audiobook, not too long but enough to aurally illustrate the authors text. Very well read by Robert Powell. One would expect no less.

  • Chavs

  • The Demonization of the Working Class
  • By: Owen Jones
  • Narrated by: Leighton Pugh
  • Length: 11 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 354
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 316
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 313

In this acclaimed investigation, Owen Jones explores how the working class has gone from 'salt of the earth' to 'scum of the earth.' Exposing the ignorance and prejudice at the heart of the chav caricature, he portrays a far more complex reality. The chav stereotype, he argues, is used by governments as a convenient fig leaf to avoid genuine engagement with social and economic problems and to justify widening inequality.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A really good listen, and do right in many ways

  • By Mr on 07-04-17

Valuable study of modern Britain

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-01-19

Like his book, The Estabishment, this book should be required reading for anyone who want to have a better understanding of modern Britain and the grievous conceit of those who see themselves as being a cut above the rest. Owen Jones has noticed and studied a social phenomena which many other social commentators have ignored. And with his skill as a researcher and writer he has produced a definitive exploration of the subject. And as if that wasn't enough, the reader Leighton Pugh, does a superb job.

There is nothing new about the phenomenon of poor exploited people being despised by their privileged neighbours. Attitudes to slaves, the poor, the less educated and the generally less privileged have often if not always been characterised by wholly unjustified abuse and opprobrium. No doubt the underlying psychology is one of moral justification. If you live a relatively prosperous life you don't want your enjoyment of that life to be marred by feelings of guilt. So the rich unconsciously have a vested interest in despining the poor. Jones makes this point himself.

Very occasionally I thought the author got it slightly wrong, but only slightly and very occasionally. Describing the song I Predict a Riot by the Kaiser Chiefs as being emblematic of middle class indifference strikes me as one such example. Overall this is a very valuable and readable acount of a nasty social phenomenon we should be more aware of. And he writes the book in a way which makes it interesting. Its not a sermon from the Mount.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • No Ordinary Time

  • By: Doris Kearns Goodwin
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 6 hrs and 11 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2

Presenting an aspect of American history that has never been fully told, Doris Kearns Goodwin describes how the isolationist and divided United States of 1940 was unified under the extraordinary leadership of Franklin Roosevelt to become, only five years later, the preeminent economic and military power in the world. Using diaries, interviews, and White House records, Goodwin paints an intimate, detailed portrait not only of the presidency during wartime but also of Franklin and Eleanor themselves.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Superb reading of a top book

  • By Lord Peridot on 30-01-19

Superb reading of a top book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-01-19

I thought twice about gettting this audiobook on account of it being abridged. And as some others have pointed out its a shame that it is abridged, as its such a good book and the sort of people who are interested in this book would probably rather have more of it than less. It does seem a strange decision on the part of the publisher. However, the abridgement has been done extremely well, so you wouldn't notice you were missing anything if you hadn't been told. And the audiobook flows very naturally.

Edward Herrman, the reader, is a revelation to me. And definitely one of those superior readers who are worth looking out for in the Audible library. Every aspect of his reading enhances the book. And he has great skill with accents. Both subtle and convincing. I especially liked his Eleanor Roosevelt, a bit thin, stilted & posh but ever so kind. As for the book itself, its a fascinating and sympathetic insight into the life of the Roosevelts in the run up to WWII and for the duration of the war itself.

  • Citizen Clem

  • A Biography of Attlee
  • By: John Bew
  • Narrated by: Roger Davis
  • Length: 26 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 146
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 131

Clement Attlee was the Labour prime minister who presided over Britain's radical postwar government, delivering the end of the empire in India, the foundation of the NHS and Britain's place in NATO. Called 'a sheep in sheep's clothing', his reputation has long been that of an unassuming character in the shadow of Churchill. But as John Bew's revelatory biography shows, Attlee was not only a hero of his age but an emblem of it, and his life tells the story of how Britain changed over the 20th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding biography

  • By michael Billington on 11-09-17

Labour's quiet hero

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-12-18

If you wanted to understand the foundations of modern Britain through a single book then John Bew's biography of Attlee would be a good a choice. As the author points out Attlee's life, work & opinions both shape & reflect Britain's transition from being the World's top imperial power to becoming a modern socialist state of the post WWII period. And it is one of those curious ironies that this man, who was so important to the story of modern Britain, should have been anything but showy, just the plain, decent, determined man that even he acknowledged himself to be.

He fought in WWI & supported the British Empire yet in his 1945 ministry he oversaw Indian independence & brokered the new British Commonwealth. In the 1930s he helped keep the Labour party together after the fiasco of MacDonald's defection to the Tory dominated national govt. In WWII he worked hard as Churchill's deputy PM to help win the war, only to defeat Churchill in the 1945 general election with a swing to Labour of about 10%. His achievements as PM included a huge council house buliding programme, the establishment of the NHS & commissioning Britain's first nuclear weapons.

For good reason, this book has won many awards. And I'm sure there are many history readers like myself who look forward to learning more from the future books of John Bew. Well read by Roger Davis but accents are not your forté friend. Even Davis' rendition of key figures like Churchill are pretty painful. No matter.