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Wakefield, United Kingdom
  • 62
  • reviews
  • 246
  • helpful votes
  • 95
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  • A Doll's House (Audible Theatre Collection: Ibsen)

  • By: Henrik Ibsen
  • Narrated by: Harry Myers, Laura Carmichael, Sarah Whitehouse, and others
  • Length: 2 hrs and 10 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16

Nora Helmers is her husband Torvald's adorable 'little doll'. Pretty and doll-like in her doll's house with her healthy children and seemingly respectable life, she and her family have it all... or so it seems. Behind closed doors, like a lot of Ibsen's antiheroines, Nora is unhappy and unfulfilled. She is thoughtful, intelligent and trapped, playing the role of a dutiful wife in a situation that doesn't arouse any of her passions, in a society that believes that she shouldn't have any.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My first Ibsen ...

  • By M on 02-06-18

My first Ibsen ...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-18

I don't have enough experience of the theatre to in any way judge whether this is a classic performance of 'A Doll's House' but I did really enjoy it and thought the performances were excellent. I will definitely be listening to the rest of the plays and really appreciate that Audible has included them in their audio shows so that those of us who do not get to see them on the stage can experience them this way.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Departure

  • Owner Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Neal Asher
  • Narrated by: Peter Noble
  • Length: 16 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 314
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 280
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 278

The Argus Space Station looks down on a nightmarish Earth. And from this safe distance, the Committee enforces its despotic rule. There are too many people and too few resources, and they need 12 billion to die before Earth can be stabilized. So corruption is rife, people starve, and the poor are policed by mechanized overseers and identity-reader guns. Citizens already fear the brutal Inspectorate with its pain inducers. But to reach its goals, the Committee will unleash satellite laser weaponry, taking carnage to a new level.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A story of two halves

  • By J Hitch on 22-01-18

It's not easy being green ...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-03-18

Neal Asher draws his ‘Owner’ universe from the darkest, most fevered Eurogeddon nightmares that haunt the most paranoid of UKIP's members, and he finds his characters and their dialogue in the Daily Mail’s Letters pages. As a Science Fiction author, he is to the Libertarian Right what Iain M. Banks was to the Left, and uses his politics to fuel his image of our destiny, but whereas Banks wrote with wit and mischief, Asher writes in blood and brutality. There’s nothing subtle here, and his cynicism (of the State as well as its citizens) saturates the story almost to the point of dystopian satire, except that you know that he means it and that the future he portrays is very plausible - in his mind, at least. But, though my own politics lay way, way to the left of his, I love his novels; from the visceral set-piece battles, to the wonderfully imagined creatures and technologies he brings to life, I can't help but race through his books, and as soon as I've finished listening to this I'll be getting stuck into part two. And the narrator is just brilliant too.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Pursuit of Power

  • Europe 1815-1914
  • By: Richard J Evans
  • Narrated by: Napoleon Ryan
  • Length: 41 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 64
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 59

The Pursuit of Power draws on a lifetime of thinking about 19th-century Europe to create an extraordinarily rich, surprising and entertaining panorama of a continent undergoing drastic change. The aim of this audiobook is to reignite the sense of wonder that permeated this remarkable era, as rulers and ruled navigated overwhelming cultural, political and technological changes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent history

  • By Daniel Johnstone on 27-08-17

Very, very interesting.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-07-17

As a chap who was brought up and educated in the Anglosphere, the French Revolution is something I was vaguely aware of as happening at some time over there in the Frenchy bit of Europe. The long shadow that Napoleon cast over European dynamics was never made clear to me, never discussed in history lessons, and I was never shown how deeply integrated Britain was with the various pursuits for power that followed 1815. This is an important book for British readers especially, I think (though I would also love to hear what other Europeans think) because in the background of this Brexit thing that's going on at the moment there's a belief that 'we' in the UK were generally doing our own thing throughout most of history and were generally pretty bloody marvellous at it too! This book puts that whole perspective in some perspective and really does bring to the fore the fact that we are in pretty much every way possible affected by what goes on in Europe. I really liked Napolean's narration too and he has my full admiration for taking on all those names from across Europe.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Abyss Beyond Dreams

  • By: Peter F. Hamilton
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 22 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,064
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 984
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 983

When images of a lost civilization are 'dreamed' by a self-proclaimed prophet of the age, Nigel Sheldon, inventor of wormhole technology and creator of the Commonwealth society, is asked to investigate. Especially as the dreams seem to be coming from the Void - a mysterious area of living space monitored and controlled because of its hugely destructive capabilities.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Immersed in the void.

  • By Martin on 06-11-14

Ever wonder how Marx would have dealt with aliens?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-11-14

PFH's writing and storytelling just keep getting better as the decades pass, and with this novel he's being more adventurous with the construction of the narrative too. It's a wonderful mix of hard SF and political fantasy, with a dollop of Ankh Morpork and Marxist revolution in too. Thoroughly enjoyed, as expected, and brilliantly narrated.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • The Martian

  • By: Andy Weir
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 16,884
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 15,893
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 15,864

Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there. After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he's alive - and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive. Chances are, though, he won't have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plainold "human error" are much more likely to kill him first.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exhilarating adventure. Brilliantly executed.

  • By Kaggy on 30-08-14

Excellent!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-10-14

Absolutely wonderful! Great, tense writing, flawless narration and spotless production - what more could you ask for? It's not literature, but it is one of those truly visceral books that made me smile, laugh and wince at every calamity that befalls our poor, yet brilliant, hero. Read it!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • In the Shadow of the Sword

  • The Battle for Global Empire and the End of the Ancient World
  • By: Tom Holland
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 17 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 287
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 222
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 222

In the 6th century AD, the Near East was divided between two venerable empires: the Persian and the Roman. A hundred years on and one had vanished forever, while the other seemed almost finished. Ruling in their place were the Arabs: an upheaval so profound that it spelt, in effect, the end of the ancient world. In The Shadow of the Sword, Tom Holland explores how this came about.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • enlightening!

  • By julien on 13-04-13

Epic. And bloody.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-10-14

A vast and epic account of the blood-soaked centuries that saw the fall of the ancient Zoroastrian and Christian empires, and the rise of Islam. I found the book quite difficult, but I think this was due more to the audio format - where it is more difficult to keep track of the names of people and places - than to the writing itself. However, it was very interesting and the tales from that era are certainly full of drama. And blood.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Dinner

  • By: Herman Koch
  • Narrated by: Clive Mantle
  • Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 167
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 106
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 106

A summer's evening in Amsterdam and two couples meet at a fashionable restaurant. Between mouthfuls of food and over the polite scrapings of cutlery, the conversation remains a gentle hum of polite discourse - the banality of work, the triviality of holidays. But behind the empty words, terrible things need to be said, and with every forced smile and every new course, the knives are being sharpened. Each couple has a fifteen-year-old son.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A wonderfully dark modern parable.

  • By M on 19-10-14

A wonderfully dark modern parable.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-10-14

I'm a sucker for a good allegory, and Herman Koch serves up a deliciously dark apologue in "The Dinner" with the dysfunctional families at the heart of the tale representing those of us in the privileged West, and how - either through complacency, complicity or actual downright bloodyminded and fully conscious awareness - we'll cross our so called "civilised" moral borders in order to protect our own, and hang onto our entitled lifestyle, should they be threatened.
There's nobody to like here and, wonderfully, the only character who's willing to do what's "right" is the one we universally and instinctively despise: a vain and self-serving politician. We're all in here somewhere, no matter our class, and we're all found guilty. A wonderful and disturbing book that was brilliantly narrated.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Treasure Island

  • By: Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Narrated by: Tim Gregory
  • Length: 7 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18

Clear the decks for one of the greatest swashbuckling stories ever told. Masterfully crafted, Treasure Island is a stunning yarn of piracy on the fiery tropic seas, an unforgettable tale of treachery that embroils a host of legendary swashbucklers, from honest young Jim Hawkins to sinister, two-timing Israel Hands, to evil incarnate, blind Pew.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Classic well read

  • By Kenny on 27-04-17

Arrrrrrrrr!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-09-14

Wonderfully dark and full of adventure, intrigue and rum. An absolute classic that I can't believe I've waited till I'm nearly 40 to read.

Hilldiggers cover art
  • Hilldiggers

  • A Novel of the Polity
  • By: Neal Asher
  • Narrated by: David Marantz
  • Length: 16 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 37

During a war between two planets in the same solar system - each occupied by adapted humans - what is thought to be a cosmic superstring is discovered. After being cut, this object collapses into four cylindrical pieces, each about the size of a tube train. Each is densely packed with either alien technology or some kind of life. They are placed for safety in three ozark cylinders of a massively secure space station.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A master storyteller at the top of his game

  • By Alasdair on 19-08-14

Solid Asher.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-09-14

This is a great piece of scifi that's not as brutal as Asher's other books, and probably the better for it. Thoroughly enjoyed.

  • Why Nations Fail

  • The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty
  • By: Daron Acemoglu, James Robinson
  • Narrated by: Dan Woren
  • Length: 17 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 417
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 337

Brilliant and engagingly written, Why Nations Fail answers the question that has stumped the experts for centuries: Why are some nations rich and others poor, divided by wealth and poverty, health and sickness, food and famine?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Repetitive, but interesting.

  • By M on 25-09-14

Repetitive, but interesting.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-09-14

As has been said - repetitively - by other reviewers, this is a very repetitive book. And not just thematically. If you removed the words "inclusive", "extractive", "institutions", "glorious revolution of 1688" and ”creative destruction" the book would be about 9 hours shorter. It's still quite interesting (especially when they zoom in on specific histories, like with Botswana, Uzbekistan and Brazil, about which I knew nothing) and I kept going to the end, but the Grand Theory being espoused doesn't seem all that remarkable, unfortunately. (It can be summarised as: If your public institutions are strong enough to stop the gangsters from getting in charge, you're probably going to be okay, if not, you're screwed.) So, not bad, but not brilliant either. (Did I mention it's repetitive?")

13 of 13 people found this review helpful