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Quincy

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  • reviews
  • 20
  • helpful votes
  • 36
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  • The Terror

  • By: Dan Simmons
  • Narrated by: Tom Sellwood
  • Length: 28 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 317
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 293
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 293

The most advanced scientific enterprise ever mounted, Sir John Franklin’s 1845 expedition in search of the fabled Northwest Passage had every expectation of triumph. But for almost two years his ships, HMS Terror and Erebus, have been trapped in the Arctic ice. Supplies of fuel and food are running low. Scurvy, starvation and even madness are beginning to take their toll. And yet the real threat isn’t from the constantly shifting, alien landscape, the flesh-numbing temperatures or being crushed by the unyielding, frozen ocean. No, the real threat is far more terrifying. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic read

  • By Caroline Pearson on 02-05-18

Polar Bear Predator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-18

One hundred and thirty four men are trapped on doomed ships in arctic pack ice 1000 miles away from civilization on the doomed Franklin's expedition, is that dramatic enough material ?

Not in Dan Simmons fictionalised account of the lost expedition it turns out that they were picked off my a supernatural entity which has more in common with the Predator in the Schwarzenegger film than the polar bear.

The story has some serious pacing problems and at the end of the book you feel like you have endured a season or two on the ice with the repetitive storyline. The story could have been at least 5 hours shorter and the narrative would have been better served.

It's not a bad book and the narration is actually quite good, having not seen the TV adaptation I was hoping that the story would be more down to earth.

  • The Hunt for Red October

  • By: Tom Clancy
  • Narrated by: Lance C Fuller
  • Length: 17 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 277
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 247
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 249

The runaway international number one best seller that launched Tom Clancy's spectacular career and introduced his acclaimed hero, Jack Ryan, in the ultimate submarine adventure - now reissued with a new cover. Silently, beneath the chill Atlantic waters, Russia's ultrasecret missile submarine, the Red October, is heading west. The Americans want her. The Russians want her back. With all-out war only seconds away, the superpowers race across the ocean on the most desperate mission of a lifetime.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Terrible Reader

  • By Lynda on 22-02-18

A great book let down by a poor narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-02-18

Any additional comments?

I have been waiting for many years for this book to appear as an audiobook and when it finally happens the narrator seems bored and emotionless. Its a real shame as the story is strong. The constant mis pronunciation Ramius is very annoying !

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Fourth Protocol

  • By: Frederick Forsyth
  • Narrated by: David Rintoul
  • Length: 13 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 770
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 636
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 634

Plan Aurora, hatched in a remote dacha in the forest outside Moscow and initiated with relentless brilliance and skill, is a plan within a plan that, in its spine-chilling ingenuity, breaches the ultra-secret Fourth Protocol and turns the fears that shaped it into a living nightmare. A crack Soviet agent, placed under cover in a quiet English country town, begins to assemble a jigsaw of devastation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Espionage in the Cold War era

  • By C on 23-12-12

A good read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-17

Any additional comments?

A very good book, this is the first book that I have read by Forsyth but it wont be the last

  • The Fleet at Flood Tide

  • America at Total War in the Pacific, 1944-1945
  • By: James D. Hornfischer
  • Narrated by: Pete Larkin
  • Length: 23 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 11

One of America's preeminent military historians, James D. Hornfischer has written his most expansive and ambitious book to date. Drawing on new primary sources and personal accounts of Americans and Japanese alike, here is a thrilling narrative of the climactic end stage of the Pacific War, focusing on the US invasion of the Mariana Islands in June 1944 and the momentous events that it triggered.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good but not his best, its should have been 2 or even 3 books.

  • By Zatoichisan on 10-11-16

Very good if rushed account

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-17

Any additional comments?

I can only agree with the other reviews of this audio book that the author would have been better served making this work into two or three volumes. Important battles are covered but not in any great depth.

That is not to say that this is not a good book and I look forward to reading it again

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection

  • By: Arthur Conan Doyle, Stephen Fry - introductions
  • Narrated by: Stephen Fry
  • Length: 71 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 6,401
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,995
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5,971

Ever since he made his first appearance in A Study In Scarlet, Sherlock Holmes has enthralled and delighted millions of fans throughout the world. Now Audible is proud to present Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes: The Definitive Collection, read by Stephen Fry. A lifelong fan of Doyle's detective fiction, Fry has narrated the complete works of Sherlock Holmes - four novels and five collections of short stories.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant audio book, shame about the navigation.

  • By Mr. P. J. Marsh on 10-03-17

Outstanding Audiobook

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-03-17

Any additional comments?

This is a great audio book being narrated by someone who loves Conan Doyle's work. It could hardly be improved on.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Victory at Villers-Bretonneux

  • By: Peter FitzSimons
  • Narrated by: Robert Meldrum
  • Length: 24 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8

It's early 1918, and after four brutal years the fate of the Great War hangs in the balance. On the one hand, the fact that Vladimir Lenin and the Bolsheviks have seized power in Russia - immediately suing for peace with Germany - means that no fewer than one million of the Kaiser's soldiers can now be transferred from there to the Western Front. On the other, now that America has entered the war, it means that two million American soldiers are also on their way, to tip the scales of war in favor of the Allies.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Good detail: Childlike parochialism

  • By Kelvin on 30-04-17

A very good historical account

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-03-17

What other book might you compare Victory at Villers-Bretonneux to, and why?

The book almost feels like a continuation of Paul Ham's excellent "Passchendaele: Requiem for Doomed Youth" as the story picks up more or less after the battle in 1917. Reading Ham's book before this one provides you more perspective about the state of the BEF in France in 1918.

Any additional comments?

The book was overall a very was well researched and written history of the Anzac participation helping to stop the German Spring Offensive in 1918.

At points the book felt a little nationalistic in its accounts of the Anzac's, in that they were by far the best troops on the Western Front, that their presence inspired locals to unpack their belongings and stay in their homes because they knew the Aussies would never break.

Overall a good account of the final German offensive of 1918

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Red Storm Rising

  • By: Tom Clancy
  • Narrated by: Michael Prichard
  • Length: 31 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 757
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 694
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 692

When Moslem fundamentalists blow up a key Soviet oil complex, making an already critical oil shortage calamitous, the Russians figure they are going to have to take things into their own hands. They plan to seize the Persian Gulf, and more ambitiously, to neutralise NATO. Thus begins Red Storm, an audacious gamble that uses diplomatic maneuvers to cloak a crash military build-up. When Soviet tanks begin to roll, the West is caught off guard. What looks like a thrust turns into an all-out shooting war, possibly the climactic battle for control of the globe.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Realistic view on what could have been

  • By Charles on 15-08-14

An excellent vision of WW3

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-10-16

Any additional comments?

This is a really great audiobook, and one of Tom Clancy's best works. The characters are well written and the battles realistic and tense. The narration is really excellent and helps bring the story to life.

  • Blood of Honour

  • By: James Holland
  • Narrated by: Michael Tudor Barnes
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43

Crete, May 1941. In the face of a German invasion, Sergeant Jack Tanner is embroiled in a deadly game of survival that will test his resolve more than ever before. Not only has he fallen out with his commander but he has mortally offended Alopex, a powerful local chieftain. As if that wasn't enough, Tanner and the rest of his battalion are caught in vicious close-quarter fighting against crack German paratroopers.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A book that fails to deliver

  • By Quincy on 31-03-16

A book that fails to deliver

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-03-16

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

I could not recommend this book

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

The ending was rather silly, but in keeping with the image of an invincible CSM Tanner that we are presented all through the book.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

This was not the narrators finest hour I am afraid

Any additional comments?

Tanner, the unluckiest solider in the British Army finds himself in the middle of the Battle for Crete.

After retreating in France and Norway Tanner’s mood is not conducive to making friends and allies but getting into a bar fight with a powerful Cretan partisan leader might be considered silly. It’s difficult to take Tanner seriously though because the narrators Wilshire accent makes Tanner sound like an angry and dispirited Postman Pat.

Well CSM Tanner does it again managing to be discredited and misunderstood by Officers and other allies. While being the only capable soldier on the island, he has to deal with them as well as the Germans. If it sounds similar to the last two Tanner books, its because it is.

The book is basically a repeat of the last one; we have the German Fallschirmjäger Officer as the generic nasty German in the place of the SS officer, the Cretan Partisan in the place of CSM Blackstaff and the new Lieutenant in the role of bumbling idiot who has it in for him.

The new Lieutenant even knows Tanner from Wilshire, the same tired stick that we had in the second book.

Why Tanner fighting with the Germans is not the primary purpose of these books I don’t know. The story would be much stronger if the focus was on fighting the Germans rather than petty bickering with his Lieutenant and the Cretans

The main problem in this book is that nearly all the characters in this book are two dimensional and the story shallow. We have the same plot in a different book with Tanner's sidekick gleefully finding loads of Nobel’s Gelignite and the battles are all generic and could have taken place anywhere

In reviews the Jack Tanner Books are sometimes referred to as Richard Sharpe in WW2 but Tanner lacks the depth of Cornwall’s Sharpe. Postman Tanner does not deliver in this book I am afraid

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Armageddon

  • By: Max Hastings
  • Narrated by: John Sessions
  • Length: 7 hrs and 6 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 129
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81

Armageddon tells the story of the climatic months of the Second World War and the destruction of Hitler's Germany. In this compelling study, the author addresses the big human and military questions. Why did the Allies not win the war in 1944, when they were vastly stronger than the Germans? Why did the Russians produce the best generals? What was it like to fight the British, American, German and Soviet armies?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Masterful history. Story telling at its best.

  • By J NEILL on 18-11-08

An excellent book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-03-16

Where does Armageddon rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

The book is a very well written account of the last few months of the Third Reich from the events just before Operation Market Garden in the autumn 1944 to its eventual collapse in May 1945.

Shame its not slightly longer because I enjoyed listening to it so much

Have you listened to any of John Sessions’s other performances? How does this one compare?

First time I have listened to a book narrated by John Sessions but he does a great job here

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Scorpion Down

  • By: Ed Offley
  • Narrated by: Richard Ferrone
  • Length: 15 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7

One Navy admiral called it "one of the greatest unsolved sea mysteries of our era". To this day, the U.S. Navy officially describes it an inexplicable accident. For decades, the real story of the disaster has eluded journalists, historians, and the family members of the lost crew. But a small handful of Navy and government officials knew the truth from the very beginning: the sinking of the nuclear submarine U.S.S. Scorpion and its crew of 99 men, on May 22, 1968, was an act of war.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A detailed conspiracy theory

  • By Quincy on 17-03-16

A detailed conspiracy theory

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-03-16

What about Richard Ferrone’s performance did you like?

It was well done, however the constant mispronunciation of Submariner is irritating

Any additional comments?

ED Offley offers a detailed conspiracy theory that the USS Scorpion (SSN - 589) was sunk by a torpedo fired by a Soviet Submarine during a secret mission in May 1968.

The author provides some convincing evidence that the submarine was sent on an intelligence gathering mission after a successful patrol in the Mediterranean when the US Navy discovered a group of Soviet Surface ships and a submarine operating near the Canary Islands when the Scorpion was on its way home.

The theory is that the Soviet submarine reacted aggressively to the presence of the Scorpion and in retaliation for the Loss of the K129 in March 1968 (which they might have believed was lost due to a collision with the USS Swordfish) in the Pacific and proceeded to sink the submarine.

It is suggested that Soviets might of known that the Scorpion was sent to spy on their operation because of they had compromised the US Navy’s secret communication network. It’s argued that the North Korean’s captured the USS Pueblo in January 1968 under orders from the Russian’s to obtain it’s secret communication gear to make best use of the data and cryptographic keys flowing in from the Walker spy ring (which started operating in 1967) allowing them to ambush the submarine.

Offley claims that the US Navy knew almost immediately about the loss of the Scorpion and the fact that it was sunk by the Soviet Union due to the then Top Secret SOSUS listening posts in the Atlantic and launched a limited search operation before the Navy publically admitted it was overdue to return to its home port.

The reason why the US Navy did not publicise the sinking of the Scorpion was down to the fact that they were worried that the incident could lead to WW3 especially since tensions were already high due to America’s increasing involvement in South Vietnam and the loss of the K129. If the Americans were responsible for the loss of the K129 then they may have accepted the loss of the Scorpion and covered up the events leading up to its loss.

The account of the reasons for the loss of Scorpion is not very convincing, the evidence is circumstantial and lacks any kind of primary evidence. I find it difficult to believe that the Soviet navy ordered the sinking of the submarine or that a rogue commander of the Soviet sub acted without authorisation and care of the consequences and fired the torpedo. It would have been an open secret in the Soviet Navy which would have almost certainly have leaked out after the fall of the Soviet Union.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful