LISTENER

Dave Kinsella

  • 43
  • reviews
  • 28
  • helpful votes
  • 58
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Excellent Narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-20

Who is this guy? He's great. Adds so much when the narrator is chosen well.

Lots of Helpful Advice

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-01-20

Full of practical wisdom for learning how to deal with unbearable personal pain. About the choice to live in the present. About choosing not to accept the narrative that your mind seems addicted to continually loop around. Not so keen on the metaphysical and eschatological aspects though, to be honest. The belief that there is a universal consciousness seems little different to me, perhaps not quite as exotic, as belief in a triune God. Which has been part of the great pain I have experienced over the years. Believing in things by faith that never be shown to be true. I am conscious and a certain type of reality presents itself to my senses. And I'm also going to die. There is great suffering on this planet. More than there is joy. Everyone is so fearful. If we could all learn to live in the now, accept our circumstances, cease our striving, accept the impermanency of nature (and ourselves), stop comparing and foster loving-kindness. Then we might have peace.

Oo-Wei?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-12-19

Why does the narrator pronounce Wu Wei as Oo Wei? it's really distracting. I've never heard anyone pronounce it like that. It shouldn't be a big deal, but it knocks my concentration off as he says it over and over.

1 person found this helpful

Not Bad Overall.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-12-19

The narrator speaks a little too fast (which can be slowed down) and the main body of the book is not separated into chapters, which is a real shame. The selections themselves are fine and intro is okay (if you're a Christian I suppose you'd get more out of it). Merton was clearly dissatisfied with Christianity but for his own reasons stuck with it to the end.

An Excellent Commentary on Taoist Philosophy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-12-19

This book was such an excellent commentary on Taoist philosophy. I know when I really enjoy an audiobook because I listen to it every day and finish it quickly. and I feel like listening again! A rare feeling for me.

I'll be honest and admit I skipped the first few chapters on Tai Chi. I feel they should have been at the end, but that's just me. I want to start doing Tai Chi, or Yoga if I can't find classes near me. I know I can do online, but I'd prefer to at least start with a person-person instructor at first, and go back over those portions.

Full of Wisdom

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-12-19

I bought this after having fallen totally in L ve with his translation and performance of the Tao Te Ching. it is my favourite book of all time and I think I've listened to it at least ten time so far.

The Bhagavad Gita is not quite as powerful as the Tao Te Ching, maybe it's just my preference for non fiction showing, but it is full of insight nevertheless.

I'd never actually read the Bhagavad Gita before so I'm glad I did and I'm glad it was Mitchell's translation and narration. Stephen Mitchell is a wonderful translator and narrator and Id read anything written or spoken by him.

Lifts the Lid

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-10-19

Our ignorance on our relationship to animals is slowly lifting. They're not "just animals" and we're not that different from them. We are different in degree, not in kind.

The "Genuine Fake" Does It Again

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-19

Loved it. Alan is a joy to listen to. Almost zero pretension (who among us has none at all?), piles of insight and knowledge. Now to move on to my next Alan Watts lecture series.

Great intro to the basics of Buddhist practice

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-07-19

Jack Kornfield comes across as warm and funny at times. Very easy to listen to. Never gets heavy. Mingles lots of stories both personal and from the tradition.

Stoicism Doesn't Talk About Spirituality?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-07-19

Aurelius believed in the gods. Didn't think one could really be good without believing in them and thought atheism was immoral. What he seems to express doubt about is life after death. In my reading it was some of the Eastern strains of religion that got much closer to atheist spirituality (if you want to call it that) than Stoicism did, or at least Aurelius did.

Religion is like theatre. It is a veil that explains deeper realities. But commoners take the theatrics and the stories for the realities. These myths help in a very real way to give coherence and meaning to infinite complexity, which one could call God. And the question for me at this moment is does the universe require conscious intelligence to form and be sustained? Is it conscious in some form? Is there awareness underlying it all? Can it exist if there is no awareness to experience it?