LISTENER

jburnmurdoch

  • 1
  • review
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 2
  • ratings
  • Dream Hoarders

  • How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do About It
  • By: Richard V. Reeves
  • Narrated by: Richard V. Reeves
  • Length: 4 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3

As Reeves shows, the growing separation between the upper middle class and everyone else can be seen in family structure, neighborhoods, attitudes, and lifestyle. Those at the top of the income ladder are becoming more effective at passing on their status to their children, reducing overall social mobility. The result is not just an economic divide but a fracturing of American society along class lines. Upper-middle-class children become upper-middle-class adults.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Required reading for the privileged class

  • By jburnmurdoch on 30-09-18

Required reading for the privileged class

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-09-18

A vital read for fellow members of the meritocracy, especially as societies on both sides of the Atlantic deal with the fallout from democratic shocks meted out by the losers of the new dominant socio-economic sorting system.

Reeves delivers hard truths about how fair the modern US meritocratic system really is, and whether the idea of US exceptionalism — the land of the American Dream™️ — is justified.

Zoning laws, unpaid internships and the college admissions system are all in the dock, as Reeves makes the case that what often appear to be respectable — even admirable — goals and policies can produce and ossify class structures, inequality and social immobility.

Unequal access to childcare and early years education are also discussed in depth, and for every mechanism that Reeves believes is part of the problem, he proposes possible solutions, from personal decisions to government policies.

All in all, an excellent, thoroughly researched and refreshingly evidence-based examination of the causes of worsening social mobility in America, providing plenty of challenging proposals for readers to consider at the end.