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Jill Phillips

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  • 21
  • helpful votes
  • 22
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Waste of most people's time

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-12-19

Make sure your shoes are polished, you're dressed smart every day & have a good hair style - then ... a couple of sentences later you close a deal and become head of Sales.... Yeah! Not what I was hoping for.

A Great Gap in a Caring Citizen's Knowledge

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-18

This book is a passionate and erudite plea for those responsible for the well-being of citizens living in Britain to realise the reality they have created in our judicial system. From the very apex of knowledge which informed the world, to the fast crumbling system which has decimated - even criminalised -our previously renowned police force, our solicitors and barristers - who faithfully work quite as hard as the put-upon nurses and doctors in our NHS; all for a pittance. To the courts, high and low which must enrol their judges from the same damaged professional bodies of men and women who - together with the very many innocent people banged up with the guilty - and the victims of crime themselves - seem to be the only people who know the awful truth through their own terrible and terrifying experiences.
It seems that students in schools have just begun to benefit from social studies. There is, indeed, a very long way to go.
I commend this anonymously - but beautifully written book to Jeremy Corbyn's caring supporters - as much as to his potential government - whilst, at the same time condemning the present government for its total lack of humanity - and for its all-consuming greed.

Unique, Moving and Magical

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-18

Any additional comments?

'A Romance on Three Legs' is the fondly amusing title of this delightful book - which tells the touching story of Glenn Gould - that unique musical genius - his unique piano tuners (one in particular) and the pianos (one in particular) that they loved.
Not only is the story most movingly written and performed, but it offers unexpectedly profound and fascinating information about the art and practice of piano tuning itself.
A truly wonderful book that musicians and audiences alike would be sure to enjoy.

Only the Performance is being rated here

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-17

I have listened so far only for an hour. The contents of the book promise to be hard won and very interesting. However, the reader is unfortunately chosen because her (rather beautifully toned) voice has succombed to one of those fashions which repeat the same pitched pattern over and over again (in this case the minor 3rd, middle C# to E) - whatever the content - questions, responses, facts,..whatever Such affectations deny any depth of meaning. This is especially sad when the text is actually discussing a wide range of physical, mental and emotional connotations which must affect pitch. I'll try to carry on, but I guess it may be hard.

1 person found this helpful

Sam Dastor's informed Reading is sheer Genius.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-01-16

Would you listen to The Jewel in the Crown again? Why?

Yes.

What did you like best about this story?

Everything.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

It can't possibly be as good as Sam Dastor's reading.

Any additional comments?

I wish Part 2 (The Day of the Scorpion - upon which I've just embarked) was being read by Sam Dastor. Richard Brown's reading is boring and (worse still) totally unresearched.

1 person found this helpful

Cutting for Stone cover art

No need at all to be squeamish

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-03-15

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

I was put off by the description of this book for months before deciding to download just the 1st volume as a taster. The book's description actually leads one to think the story will be quite other than it is. I feel it's decidedly not a spoiler to say - whatever else is conveyed through the manner of their birth - that the twins are separated immediately and live physically independent and healthy lives.
Once begun, I couldn't stop listening.

Old Values Inform New Era

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-13

Any additional comments?

You say:
Step
3
Write your review by answering the following questions:

I say: Your questions don't add up to my review; which I would, in fact, like to write.

2 people found this helpful

Genuinely great writing. Truly terrible titling.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-13

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Have already done so.

What did you like best about this story?

Descriptions, sights, sounds, risk-taking, research, Maori language spoken persuasively, compassion, depth, respect ... so many things.

Have you listened to any of Mark Meadows’s other performances? How does this one compare?

No. Comparison therefore impossible, but I can say he was wonderful. I felt for his obvious discomfort with the meaningless planet 'n sign-lumbered chapter titles when he read out ' Aquarius in Saturn'; possibly as gentle protest but presumably in error!

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I was deeply moved by so many things understood and penned so beautifully by such a young writer.I was, however, almost overwhelmingly sad that such a wonderful book will just not be read by many discriminating readers as a result of the irritating and fatuous astrological references. Being myself, both an astrologer and a writer, I purchased the book out of great curiosity, fanned not least by the fact that it had won this most prestigious award. Readers' accounts don't seem to mention the profoundly un-illuminating qualities of the planetary, geophysical and clock-chiming nuggets which jarred my own progress so regularly along the way. What did they really think?

I am, even so, giving the book to my (seriously discriminating) children for Xmas. They would naturally find (even apt) astrological references extremely off-putting. So they will be issued with instructions to ignore them completely and, even so, expect to enjoy the book as much as they would enjoy a Dickens masterpiece; which is what I really think has, indeed, been achieved.

The best 20th. century novel I've ever read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 25-03-11

I'm a musician and very hard to please. I found this book by accident. I've recommended it to everybody I think could reach it. It's wonderful... truly wonderful.
It's the searingly moving and intricately informed story of the no-longer-tolerated 'production'(sic), practice and humanly demanding life of a castrato singer. I say no more.
Other books which have attempted to enter such culturally particular spheres have won big prizes. But I have never come across one which doesn't just skip the hard reality of such a life itself in favour of the bits of stories that inevitably attach to it. (Not that such stories do not also attach to the hero of 'Cry to Heaven'.) This book skips nothing.
It's a genuine masterpiece.
And it's been driving me mad, because all I've been able to find by Anne Rice to date is a load of vampires! I'll have another try now. I can't imagine I'll find anything, but if I do I know it can't be as amazing.

3 people found this helpful

A bit part in a Parallel Life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-11

I was always thrilled by the story and now much more so by its deservedly acclaimed telling.
My parents were 'the King's speech doctor's' Harley St. care-takers.I was just born. My mother told me I was in the room downstairs as the King made his broadcasts. This is not borne out by Mark Logue's fascinating book, but just once or twice early on perhaps? I have no idea of course, but I always imagined I may have cried out of place...
My father wrote, 'in 1938 we moved ...into a prestige area - Harley St. W1 as live-in caretakers ...until late 1941 and she(ie I)was taken into Regents Park every day where she became known as the Princess of Harley St. by the local mothers.'(I love that bit!
y mother said we watched the 'dog fights'in the sky . My father said sourly that we had to be pulled to safety...)
'The intense bombing of the Battle of Britain eventually drove us out after the house 3 doors away had been clawed down into dust and Madame Tussauds 200 yards away was completely destroyed by a landmine on a parachute.' (Monty Python at work here?!JP)
'I used to have to cycle to work in Whitehall via Regent St. and Haymarket over roads that were completely covered in broken plate glass after the night's work by the Luftwaffe..'

In fact my father set up and maintained the underground War Cabinet telephone system (and advised on its present museum presentation), at times he worked daily in 10 Downing St or Buckingham Palace .... Most likely the King used telephones he looked after to call Lionel Logue! He too had great stories to tell. I wish he had kept more detailed notes.

Please excuse me if this is not so much a review as an enthusiastic personal appreciation of 'The King's Speech'. It has coloured in for me a little of the background of my own infancy and for this I award it 10 out of 10 stars!
My son is sending me a DVD, so I still have the film to look forward to. Thank you so much to all concerned for this thoroughly heart-warming story.

14 people found this helpful