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Gabrielle

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 8
  • helpful votes
  • 34
  • ratings
  • History of a Pleasure Seeker

  • By: Richard Mason
  • Narrated by: Dan Stevens
  • Length: 8 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 31

Piet Barol is an alluring and intelligent young man who has escaped his drab existence, living with his father in the university town of Leiden, and moved to Amsterdam to take up a job at a stunning mansion in the city's 'Gilded Curve'. He has been employed by the extremely wealthy Vermeulen-Sickerts family to tutor their son Egbert, a boy with prodigious musical talent who has not set foot outside for a year and a half.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Surprisingly pleasurable...

  • By Adele on 18-05-13

Terrific storytelling by both author and narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 17-12-16

This book ended far too quickly for me. It was a clever story, really rich in detail and characterisation, and Dan Stevens was an inspired narrator. His voice perfectly captured the beautiful language that Richard Mason wrote, and I was engaged throughout.

  • A Symphony of Echoes

  • The Chronicles of St Mary's, Book 2
  • By: Jodi Taylor
  • Narrated by: Zara Ramm
  • Length: 8 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,030
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,884
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,881

Book Two in the madcap time-travel series based at the St Mary's Institute of Historical Research that seems to be everyone's cup of tea. In the second book in the Chronicles of St Mary's series, Max and the team visit Victorian London in search of Jack the Ripper, witness the murder of Archbishop Thomas A Becket in Canterbury Cathedral, and discover that dodos make a grockling noise when eating cucumber sandwiches.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • More entertainment

  • By Robyn on 09-11-16

Great series

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-09-16

This series is a real treasure - a fantastic conceit and well executed. The narrator does a terrific job as well. Very entertaining.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Gold

  • By: Chris Cleave
  • Narrated by: Emilia Fox
  • Length: 11 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 150
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 112

Usually, this is where we'd tell you what this book is about. But with Chris Cleave, it's a bit different. Because if you've read The Other Hand or Incendiary, you'll know that what his books are about is only part of the story - what really matters is how they make you feel. Gold is about the limits of human endurance, both physical and emotional. It will make you cry. Gold is about what drives us to succeed - and what we choose to sacrifice for success. It will make you feel glad to be alive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Emotional Rollercoaster

  • By Destination Hulk on 11-01-13

Entertaining character study

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-04-15

I really enjoyed this book and the narration was excellent. The main characters were well written and the story was surprising and interestingly told.

  • Everyday Sexism

  • By: Laura Bates
  • Narrated by: Laura Bates, Sarah Brown
  • Length: 10 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 207
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 204

Women are standing up and #shoutingback. In a culture that's driven by social media, for the first time women are using this online space (@EverydaySexism www.everydaysexism.com) to come together, share their stories, and encourage a new generation to recognise the problems that women face. This book is a call to arms in a new wave of feminism and it proves sexism is endemic - socially, politically, and economically. But women won't stand for it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I inhabit a world that I am oblivious to.

  • By Mr. O. Jollands on 03-12-14

Sobering

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-03-15

This book enraged me because of what it discussed and how far we still have left to go. It was difficult at times to stay hopeful that anything will change, but Laura Bates has done a commendable job of organising her theses and supporting them with horrifically true stories from the Everyday Sexism project. She is also a terrific narrator and did a great job.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Children Act

  • By: Ian McEwan
  • Narrated by: Lindsay Duncan
  • Length: 6 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 876
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 790
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 786

Fiona Maye is a leading High Court judge, presiding over cases in the family court. She is renowned for her fierce intelligence, exactitude and sensitivity. But her professional success belies private sorrow and domestic strife. There is the lingering regret of her childlessness, and now her marriage of 30 years is in crisis. At the same time, she is called on to try an urgent case: for religious reasons, a beautiful 17-year-old boy, Adam, is refusing the medical treatment that could save his life, and his devout parents share his wishes. Time is running out.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Who is the ultimate judge?

  • By Kaggy on 10-05-17

Mental Gymnastics

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-11-14

What made the experience of listening to The Children Act the most enjoyable?

First let me say that Lindsay Duncan's narration is superb, not only because she is an excellent performer, but because her voice is so well cast. She is exactly as I imagine the protagonist of the story to sound: a bit cold, intellectual, controlled, yet still possessing the power to surprise.

What other book might you compare The Children Act to, and why?

I can't think of another book like it, as I typically listen to crime thrillers and historical fiction. However, this was written in such a way that I was very eager to hear what happened next, which is a true feat in a book where not a whole lot actually happens.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

I enjoyed the reasoning behind her judgement of the separation of the Siamese twins - labyrinthine, well reasoned, and very clever.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Judgement Never Ends

Any additional comments?

I'm now reading Ian McEwan's Sweet Tooth, read by the equally accomplished Juliet Stephenson.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful