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A. Hunt

  • 8
  • reviews
  • 16
  • helpful votes
  • 20
  • ratings
  • Huntress Moon

  • By: Alexandra Sokoloff
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94

FBI Special Agent Matthew Roarke is closing in on a bust of a major criminal organization in San Francisco when he witnesses an undercover member of his team killed right in front of him on a busy street, an accident Roarke can't believe is coincidental. His suspicions put him on the trail of a mysterious young woman who appears to have been present at each scene of a years-long string of accidents and murders, and who may well be that most rare of killers: a female serial.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very good book

  • By sally on 26-10-15

Satisfying, well paced, a story with depth

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-16

This is a serial killer thriller with a difference. You'll be rooting for the killer, for all the right reasons. Makes Robin Hood look like child's play.
Good atmosphere & characters. Highly recommended- and now to download the next one...

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Upstairs at the Party

  • By: Linda Grant
  • Narrated by: Tricia Kelly
  • Length: 11 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 32

In the early '70s a glamorous couple known as Evie/Stevie appear out of nowhere on the isolated concrete campus of a new university. To a group of teenagers experimenting with radical ideas they seem blown back from the future, unsettling everything and uncovering covert desires. But the flamboyant self-expression hides deep anxieties. For Adele, with the most to conceal, Evie/Stevie become a lifelong obsession.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • spoilt by the narrator

  • By Helen on 18-05-15

Powerfully conveys the heady youth of the 70s

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-08-14

Adele spent her university years watching and learning, reading and discussing, partying and experimenting, discovering herself, attempting to escape the traumatic experiences of her teens, wanting to change the world and having plenty of fun doing it. She's liberated, strong-minded and part of a new social order, brimming with confidence and verve. But she becomes haunted by an event that took place upstairs at a party, and the jarring shock of that night never quite leaves her as she moves through the decades of career, motherhood and on into late middle age. Her reflections are as compelling as the account of her student days. Great story, with a wistfulness that avoids becoming maudlin, and well narrated.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • A Capital Union

  • By: Victoria Hendry
  • Narrated by: Helen Belbin
  • Length: 5 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2

Edinburgh, World War Two. Ayrshire lass Agnes Thorne, just 17 and newlywed, is gamely trying to be the dutiful wife and fine Edinburgh lady, but aloof city folk are testing her spirit – as is her husband, Jeff. Increasingly drawn into the Scottish independence movement and in awe of its charismatic leader, Jeff’s refusal to sign up for the British Army in such turbulent times threatens both his own liberty and his wife’s loyalty.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Refreshing female voice on love & war

  • By A. Hunt on 16-08-14

Refreshing female voice on love & war

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-08-14

On one level, this is a love story in which marriage doesn't turn out to be what a naive young bride had anticipated. On another, it's a tale of World War II's home front experience - privations, rations, fear, bomb shelters, neighbours and community, making do and mending, and daily balancing acts with conflicting loyalties and strong emotions. It's also the story of a girl becoming a woman, digging deep to find her inner resources when she has big decisions and harsh realities to face, when events threaten to divide her from her husband and family, and when she finds compassion and humanity where others see only a faceless, demonised enemy. National identity and politics form part of the setting and are thought-provoking. But there's humour, too, and the story is personal rather than political.
Agnes is a voice that is fresh and original, speaking across the generations of loneliness and longing, tradition and change, heart and head.

  • Various Pets Alive and Dead

  • By: Marina Lewycka
  • Narrated by: Siân Thomas
  • Length: 11 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 62
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 37

Marcus and Doro were part of a left-wing commune from the late 1960s until the early 1990s: lentils, free love, spliffs, radical politics, cheesecloth blouses, sex, housework and cooking rotas, crochet, allotments. Their children have grown up rather different from them: primary schoolteacher Clara craves order and clean bathrooms, son Serge is pretending to his parents that is still doing a Maths Ph.d. at Cambridge, while in fact making loadsamoney in the City; third child Oolie Anna, who has Down's Syndrome, is desperate to escape home and live on her own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another great romp from Marina Lewicka!

  • By laraharding on 07-04-18

Disappointing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-14

After enjoying Marina Lewycka's previous novels, and anticipating that an audio experience would be even more enjoyable than reading, I was thoroughly disappointed with this book. It's not the narrator's fault - just that the story is dull and the characters trite and 2-dimensional. What a shame when Tractors, Caravans etc were all so enjoyable and well observed - light reads that were more substantial than your average aeroplane novel.

  • The Goldfinch

  • By: Donna Tartt
  • Narrated by: David Pittu
  • Length: 32 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,750
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,460
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,474

Aged 13, Theo Decker, son of a devoted mother and a reckless, largely absent father, survives an accident that otherwise tears his life apart. Alone and rudderless in New York, he is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. He is tormented by an unbearable longing for his mother, and down the years clings to one thing that reminds him of her: a small, strangely captivating painting that ultimately draws him into the criminal underworld.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Like watching a runaway train....

  • By Robyn on 18-10-14

Superb

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-14

Another really great listen, and well narrated. This story carried me along from the very first, and I was sad and missed it when I got to the end.
There are hundreds of excellent reviews of this superb novel, so I won't embark on a longer description of the book, but it's worth noting how well it works in audio.
This must have been a hell of a task for the narrator, never mind the author!

  • We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves

  • By: Karen Joy Fowler
  • Narrated by: Katharine Mangold
  • Length: 8 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 565
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 509
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 514

Rosemary's started college, and she's decided not to tell anyone about her family. Rosemary is now an only child, but she used to have a sister the same age as her, and an older brother. Both are now gone - vanished from her life. There was something unique about Rosemary's sister, Fern. You'll have to find out for yourself what it is that makes her unhappy family unlike any other.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant story - terrible narrator

  • By Reluctant Mermaid on 17-03-15

Beside myself!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-14

This novel is funny and an easy read (listen), yet also profound and a little disturbing. I really related to the protagonist - no mean feat considering her early childhood was odd, to say the least whilst avoiding spoilers.
I also liked the narrator.
A top choice, highly recommended! So glad to hear that it's on the Booker longlist!

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • An Exquisite Sense of What Is Beautiful

  • By: J. David Simons
  • Narrated by: Nick Cheales
  • Length: 10 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

A sweeping novel of East and West, love and war, truths and denials. An eminent British writer returns to the resort hotel in the Japanese mountains where he once spent a beautiful, snowed-in winter. It was there he fell in love and wrote his best-selling novel, The Waterwheel, accusing America of being in denial about the horrific aftermath of the Tokyo firebombings and the nuclear destruction at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exquisite, beautiful story

  • By A. Hunt on 22-07-14

Exquisite, beautiful story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-07-14

This is a beautifully written story, poignant, engrossing and with compelling characters. Some of those characters, including the main one, are hard to like, but others are people I'd like to have met myself. The relationships are complex and thought-provoking. The setting of postwar Japan is fascinating, and the descriptions of 50s London and New York are satisfying and interesting. Most of all, though, fantastic storytelling. The narration is also very well done.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Americanah

  • By: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  • Narrated by: Adjoa Andoh
  • Length: 17 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,748
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,597
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,595

As teenagers, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love in a Nigeria under military dictatorship. The self-assured Ifemelu departs for America, where Obinze hopes to join her, but post-9/11 America will not let him in, and he plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, after so long apart and so many changes, will they find the courage to meet again, face to face?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Life-changing

  • By Diana John on 02-06-13

A superb achievement

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-05-13

I loved this book. The story is convincing, I cared about the main characters, I was kept guessing, and I was drawn completely into their world.

Ifemelu's journey – from an outsider to whom everything is new and unexpectedly strange, to confident resident alien in the USA – was one I could relate to from personal experience. Like her, I was eventually pulled back home, never entirely feeling a sense of belonging, yet recognising the positive aspects of American life and values that are often overlooked by the country's critics (many of them from a point of ignorance).

The descriptions of American society and the minefield of cultural groupings and sensitivities that take so long to navigate are right on the mark here. Yet the narrative flows naturally, the characters have depth (even when they're apparently there to represent stereotypes!), and the social observation blends seamlessly with the story itself: Ifemelu's account of how her life unfolds, and to a lesser extent Obinze's story in England, too. Most of all, the love story is powerful and completely credible. It's a masterpiece of storytelling.

The narration is virtually flawless and I enjoyed having this story read to me. I'll probably go back to the beginning and listen to it all again!

7 of 7 people found this review helpful