LISTENER

Mr. P. A. Gower

Altrincham, Cheshire United Kingdom
  • 5
  • reviews
  • 17
  • helpful votes
  • 24
  • ratings
  • Innovation and Entrepreneurship

  • By: Peter F. Drucker
  • Narrated by: Michael Wells
  • Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17

This is the first book to present innovation and entrepreneurship as a purposeful and systematic discipline. It clearly explains and analyzes the challenges and opportunities of America's new entrepreneurial economy. Peter Drucker, the most influential and widely-read thinker and writer on modern organizations, gives us a superbly practical book that explains what established businesses, public service institutions, and new ventures have to know, have to learn, and have to do in today's economy and marketplace.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Seminal work in Innovation but awful narration

  • By Mr. P. A. Gower on 05-02-14

Seminal work in Innovation but awful narration

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-14

Have read this classic book a couple of times (albeit ten years ago) before purchasing the audio version. As with other comments the narration is awful and makes Stephen Hawking's speech box sound human! Although it is worth persisting, as with a couple of other reviews would suggest you buy the book for this one. Listening to this has prompted me to re-read and has reminded me how good this book is at providing a systematic approach to innovation and entrepreneurship

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Plato's Republic

  • By: The Great Courses, David Roochnik
  • Narrated by: Professor David Roochnik Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 106
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 90
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 90

More than 2,000 years later, Plato's Republic remains astonishingly relevant to our everyday lives. It poses one question after another that might well have been drawn from the headlines and debates of our nation's recent history: What sort of person should rule the state? Are all citizens equal before the law? Should everyone have equal access to health care? Plato's greater inquiry, however, was into the question of defining justice itself and the reasons why a person would choose a life aligned with that virtue.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Heartily recommended if you are new to Plato

  • By Mr. P. A. Gower on 02-01-14

Heartily recommended if you are new to Plato

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-14

I had gone through Plato's Republic on audible twice and although I had the gist of the main points I felt I hadn't quite understood it. Listening to Roochnik's lectures clarified a lot and then I listened to his lectures and then relevant chapters from The Republic back-to-back which I would recommend.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Republic

  • By: Plato
  • Narrated by: James Langton
  • Length: 11 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 19

What is at stake is far from insignificant: it is how one should live one's life. Plato's The Republic is widely acknowledged as the cornerstone of Western philosophy. Presented in the form of a dialogue between Socrates and three different interlocutors, it is an inquiry into the notion of a perfect community and the ideal individual within it. During the conversation, other questions are raised: What is goodness? What is reality? What is knowledge?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Tough book to understand whilst communting

  • By Mr. P. A. Gower on 07-11-13

Tough book to understand whilst communting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-13

The narrator used a variety of voices to great effect to emphasize the dialogue nature of Plato’s work. I don’t intend to be disparaging but it did remind me of “Jackanory” (a kid’s story telling BBC TV program from the 1970s) in that by having one narrator you get drawn into the story whereas I find I get distracted with different narrators. I hadn’t read the book prior to listening and it is easy to miss key elements of the arguments whilst listening on your commute to work and I had to repeat sections when I got lost. Although I did not fully understand the book, I was so intrigued that I bought a Great Courses audible book – Plato’s Republic (Professor David Roochnik). I found this excellent and would recommend people buying both to fully appreciate Plato's work. Initially I listened to the course and I then went through the course again switching from lectures to relevant chapters (Plato's "books").

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Heaven's Command

  • An Imperial Progress - Pax Britannica, Volume 1
  • By: Jan Morris
  • Narrated by: Roy McMillan
  • Length: 20 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 76
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48

The Pax Britannica trilogy is Jan Morris’s epic story of the British Empire from the accession of Queen Victoria to the death of Winston Churchill. It is a towering achievement: informative, accessible, entertaining and written with all her usual bravura. Heaven’s Command, the first volume, takes us from the crowning of Queen Victoria in 1837 to the Diamond Jubilee in 1897. The story moves effortlessly across the world, from the English shores to Fiji, Zululand, the Canadian prairies and beyond. Totally gripping history!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very entertaining

  • By Amazon Customer on 31-08-11

Atmospheric history

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-07-13

Would you consider the audio edition of Heaven's Command to be better than the print version?

Have not read the print version

Have you listened to any of Roy McMillan’s other performances? How does this one compare?

The narrators' sparse use of accents was used to good effect and it was nice for a change to hear a British rather than an American accent in an audible book!

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I thought the chapter on the demise of the aboriginal Tasmanians was very poigneint.

  • A Short History of Nearly Everything

  • By: Bill Bryson
  • Narrated by: William Roberts
  • Length: 18 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,568
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,799
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,745

A Short History of Nearly Everything is Bill Bryson's fascinating and humorous quest to understand everything that has happened from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. He takes subjects that normally bore the pants off most of us, like geology, chemistry, and particle physics, and aims to render them comprehensible to people who have never thought they could be interested in science. In the company of some extraordinary scientists, Bill Bryson reveals the world in a way most of us have never seen it before.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A short Review of Nearly Everything

  • By Roy on 08-08-05

A good 'light' listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-13

This is my first audible book which I listened during my hourly commute to and from to work. A nice 'light' listen although I did find myself drifting in and out at times. Have listened to it twice and have started playing it with the kids who seem to enjoy it and has led to my nine year old looking up about atoms on the internet! I have dropped a star as I believe from the book reviews that not everything stated is correct which for a quasi science book should not be the case.