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Martin

Aston Clinton, United Kingdom
  • 14
  • reviews
  • 36
  • helpful votes
  • 47
  • ratings
  • Origin

  • By: Dan Brown
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 18 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,203
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,725
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,721

The spellbinding new Robert Langdon novel from the author of The Da Vinci Code. Origin thrusts Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon into the dangerous intersection of humankind's two most enduring questions - and the earth-shaking discovery that will answer them.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Deception Point 2

  • By 451 on 10-10-17

Predictably potty

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-03-18

In this latest incarnation of the Da Vinci code plot our hero takes on the usual complement of baddies and codes. Unfortunately the big secret which is clumsily signposted from the very first page takes hours to get to and leaves the reader so frustrated that even if it did make sense, we would still be crying to be put out of our mystery.

  • Just One Damned Thing After Another

  • The Chronicles of St Mary's, Book 1
  • By: Jodi Taylor
  • Narrated by: Zara Ramm
  • Length: 9 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,084
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,864
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,861

Behind the seemingly innocuous façade of St Mary's, a different kind of historical research is taking place. They don't do 'time-travel' - they 'investigate major historical events in contemporary time'. Maintaining the appearance of harmless eccentrics is not always within their power - especially given their propensity for causing loud explosions when things get too quiet. Meet the disaster-magnets of St Mary's Institute of Historical Research as they ricochet around History.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic and fasinating romp through time

  • By al on 02-12-14

A cracking story, well read.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-07-15

Would you listen to Just One Damned Thing After Another again? Why?

I wouldn't listen to it multiple times, but it's a great read.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Just One Damned Thing After Another?

Can't really say without spoiling the surprises, but it's not a lazy book, it keeps you on your toes.

Which character – as performed by Zara Ramm – was your favourite?

It's told in the first person, and Zara does a great job of getting us into her character.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Yes, but again, it would spoil!

Any additional comments?

I love it when it's the first of a series. Look forward to coming back for more!

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Band of Brothers

  • E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne, from Normandy to Hitler's Eagle's Nest
  • By: Stephen E. Ambrose
  • Narrated by: Tim Jerome
  • Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 488
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 440
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 435

Easy Company, 506th Airborne Division, U.S. Army, was as good a rifle company as any in the world. From their rigorous training in Georgia in 1942 to D-Day and victory, Ambrose tells the story of this remarkable company, which kept getting the tough assignments. Easy Company was responsible for everything from parachuting into France early D-Day morning to the capture of Hitler's Eagle's Nest at Berchtesgaden. Band of Brothers is the account of the men of this remarkable unit.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • As good as it gets

  • By frank on 09-08-13

Interesting view of history!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-02-15

This is a fascinating account of a group of tightly bonded men fighting their way through WWII. However, in its tight focus on and admiration for Easy group, the author seems to forget that 1. There were other countries fighting as well as Americans and 2. That Britain had suffered a devastating 3 years under attack before America entered the war. The constant sniping about Britain and the British army was really irritating, reaching a startling climax when we realise that the author, along with the GIs whose story he's telling, much preferred the Germans to the British. Not your average view on WWII, but an eye opener all the same.
Would I recommend it? Some fascinating stories, esp about men bonding under extreme pressure, if you can put up with the anti-British comments.

  • The Hunter

  • Victor the Assassin, Book 1
  • By: Tom Wood
  • Narrated by: Daniel Philpott
  • Length: 15 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 724
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 673
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 667

Forget James Bond. Forget Jason Bourne. Forget Jack Bauer. Meet Victor. He's an assassin - a man with no past and no surname. But when a Paris job goes spectacularly wrong, Victor finds himself running for his life across four continents, accompanied by a woman too beautiful to trust, pursued by enemies too powerful to escape.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Overkill

  • By Mark on 31-07-14

Well I suppose it's OK, but...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-12-14

What would have made The Hunter better?

Fewer cliches

What could Tom Wood have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Characters were really obvious, typecast and at the same time, did completely "out of character" things without any explanation

What aspect of Daniel Philpott’s performance might you have changed?

He did really well considering, but with all those accents flying around, I rather lost track.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Disappointment, this was really not great, and surely the editor must have been "asleep at the switch"

Any additional comments?

Not worth the hours of listening I'm afraid. Maybe good for a teenage read, but not for grownups!

  • The Long Mars

  • The Long Earth, Book 3
  • By: Terry Pratchett, Stephen Baxter
  • Narrated by: Michael Fenton Stevens
  • Length: 12 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 704
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 652
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 649

The years 2040 - 2045: After the cataclysmic Yellowstone eruption, there is massive economic dislocation as populations flee Datum Earth to myriad Long Earth worlds. Sally, Joshua, and Lobsang are all involved in this perilous work when, out of the blue, Sally is contacted by her long-vanished father and inventor of the original Stepper device, Willis Linsay. He tells her he is planning a fantastic voyage across the Long Mars and wants her to accompany him. But Sally soon learns that Willis has ulterior motives....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • More Baxter than Pratchett?

  • By Martin on 07-07-14

More Baxter than Pratchett?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-14

Would you listen to The Long Mars again? Why?

No, it jumped around all over the place and had no narrative drive.

Has The Long Mars put you off other books in this genre?

This series yes: the characters have lost their sense of identity and drive and now see to wander aimlessly from scene to scene.

What about Michael Fenton Stevens’s performance did you like?

He's great - accents, complex dialogue, emotion, all there and brilliantly executed.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No, too long.

Any additional comments?

For me this is the last episode of the Long Earth series. A stunning start, but the momentum has gone and I'm not sure we care about any of the characters enough to pick up the next volume

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Inversions

  • Culture Series, Book 6
  • By: Iain M. Banks
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 11 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 506
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 466
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 468

In the winter palace, the King's new physician has more enemies than she at first realises. But then she also has more remedies to hand than those who wish her ill can know about. In another palace across the mountains, in the service of the regicidal Protector General, the chief bodyguard, too, has his enemies. But his enemies strike more swiftly, and his means of combating them are more traditional. Spiralling round a central core of secrecy, deceit, love, and betrayal, Inversions is a spectacular work of science fiction, brilliantly told and wildly imaginative, from an author who has set genre fiction alight.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not exactly SciFi, a view from outside The Culture

  • By Tim on 12-05-14

What Happened Iain?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-14

What did you like best about Inversions? What did you like least?

This book simply doesn't fit in the culture series. It would fit just fine into the game of thrones. Unfortunately this means that it is DULL!

What will your next listen be?

Next in the series - I think I'll just put this one down as a blip. I hope so...

Which scene did you most enjoy?

N/A

If this book were a film would you go see it?

Somewhere where I could be comfortable when I fell asleep!

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Raising Steam

  • By: Terry Pratchett
  • Narrated by: Stephen Briggs
  • Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,294
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,105
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,101

To the consternation of the patrician, Lord Vetinari, a new invention has arrived in Ankh-Morpork - a great clanging monster of a machine that harnesses the power of all of the elements: earth, air, fire and water. This being Ankh-Morpork, it’s soon drawing astonished crowds, some of whom caught the zeitgeist early and arrive armed with notepads and very sensible rainwear.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Essential for fans, but not the best of Discworld

  • By Andrew John Rae on 19-11-13

A roller coaster ride with no destination.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-12-13

Would you try another book written by Terry Pratchett or narrated by Stephen Briggs?

Yes, Night Watch, Eric, and many many other disc world stories are masterpieces of the comedy/fantasy/observation genre that Sir Terry pioneered.

Would you be willing to try another book from Terry Pratchett? Why or why not?

Like it or not, this isn't anywhere near Pratchett's best. It has the disconnected feel of the colour of magic and the light fantastic, but without the charm of discovering the disc-world anew. We'd seen all the characters before and the plot didn't take us anywhere surprising. The observations around "fundamentalists" were interesting and well observed but lost in the noise.

What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

Briggs does (as always) a fantastic job with the material, keeping his characterisations and even managing to carry off one character impersonating another with aplomb.

Was Raising Steam worth the listening time?

Of course, sir Terry always gives us something to think about, but this time what I was left thinking was where does the disc world go from here. We've arrived in the 19th century rather suddenly from the medieval world of much of the series, but the pace and tension of the best books in the series has departed and the last few in the series have trodden familiar ground.

Any additional comments?

Knowing the personal struggles of the author it feels like there is still a little more to do, but perhaps it is the time to give the disc world one last hurrah? The last few in the series feel like the approach of the end, but this book shouldn't be it.

Please, Sir Terry, give us one last disc world that's right up there with the best of them, the insane parallels, the jokes that take entire chapters to unfold, the tension, the twists, and the justice in a context of reality. We know that you can pull this off, and we're willing you bring it all together for the end of the age of the disc world.

I can keep from crying with the thought that our master craftsman can produce one last masterpiece before he lays down his tools.

  • Dominion

  • By: C. J. Sansom
  • Narrated by: Daniel Weyman
  • Length: 20 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,328
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,017
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,027

The Great Smog. London. A dense, choking fog engulfs the city and beneath it, history is re-written…1952. Twelve years have passed since Churchill lost to the appeasers and Britain surrendered to Nazi Germany after Dunkirk. As the long German war against Russia rages on in the east, the British people find themselves under dark authoritarian rule: the press, radio and television are controlled; the streets patrolled by violent auxiliary police and British Jews face ever greater constraints.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Dominion: Fantastic and Atmospheric Novel!

  • By David on 21-11-12

Atmospheric, edge of the seat stuff!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-13

What did you like most about Dominion?

This book manages to summon up the atmosphere of the era in a few penstrokes giving a rich backdrop for the story and characters without getting carried away in nostalgia or detail. Masterfully done.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Dominion?

The depictions of the characters of the age - as they would have been in this alternative history - are well written and exceptionally well performed.

What about Daniel Weyman’s performance did you like?

The pace and tone were absolutely right for the book and his convincing accents and impressions of the key characters were very well executed without being gimmicky.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, though it's long so I couldn't. I got through it in three days and deliberately talked rather than taking the tube so I could listen some more...

  • The Long Earth

  • By: Terry Pratchett, Stephen Baxter
  • Narrated by: Michael Fenton Stevens
  • Length: 11 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,937
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,604
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,608

The Western Front, 1916. Private Percy Blakeney wakes up. He is lying on fresh spring grass. He can hear birdsong, and the wind in the leaves in the trees. Where have the mud, blood, and blasted landscape of No Man's Land gone? Madison, Wisconsin, 2015. Cop Monica Jansson is exploring the burned-out home of a reclusive - some said mad, others dangerous - scientist when she finds a curious gadget: a box containing some wiring, a three-way switch and a potato. It is the prototype of a life-changing invention....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Engrossing.

  • By Martin on 10-03-13

Wow

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-12

For an author that we're so familiar with to come up with something so utterly fresh, complete and compelling is rather spine tingling.



Superbly executed Sci-Fi with the classic Pratchett integrity of story driving our characters and our interest.



Excellent job by Michael Fenton Stevens who brings a wealth of characters off the page.



Please be warned, this is the first part of a series and does not resolve the plot-lines at the end of the book.



21 of 23 people found this review helpful

  • A Blink of the Screen

  • Collected Short Fiction
  • By: Terry Pratchett, A. S. Byatt (introduction)
  • Narrated by: Michael Fenton-Stevens, Stephen Briggs
  • Length: 8 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 160
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 118
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 120

In the four decades since his first book appeared in print, Terry Pratchett has become one of the world’s best-selling and best-loved authors. Here for the first time are his short stories and other short form fiction collected into one volume. A Blink of the Screen charts the course of Pratchett’s long writing career: from his schooldays through to his first writing job on the Bucks Free Press, and the origins of his debut novel, The Carpet People; and on again to the dizzy mastery of the Discworld series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is not just one for the fans

  • By James on 11-07-13

As good as he's ever been.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-12

With the discworld so familiar, we're almost too comfortable with Pratchett. Brilliantly compelling and storytelling at its best, but this collection bring together some older stuff that reveals a freshness we've not seen for a very long time.



A rare treat.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful