LISTENER

Graham

Huntingdon, United Kingdom
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 47
  • helpful votes
  • 171
  • ratings
  • The Man Who Knew Too Much and Other Stories

  • By: G. K. Chesterton
  • Narrated by: Alan Munro
  • Length: 6 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    1.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 13

Eight adventures in this classic British mystery series featuring Horne Fisher and his trusted friend Harold March. Horne is a natural sleuth, but his inquiries develop moral consequences. Notable for their wit and sense of wonder, these tales offer an evocative portrait of upper crust English society before World War One. Contains eight stories: "The Face in the Target", "The Vanishing Prince", "The Soul of the Schoolboy", "The Bottomless Well", "The Fad of the Fisherman", "The Hole in the Wall", "The Temple of Silence", and "The Vengeance of the Statue."

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Dreadful Narration!

  • By fay on 19-11-17

The most awful narration ever

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-18

While the timbre of the narrator's voice is spot on it would appear that he has never understood the effect of punctuation on narration. He pauses in all the wrong places and the emphasis on the text is seemingly random. I have tried and tried to get through this but it just drives me nuts. The book was purchased as part of a deal from Audible so there is not much milage in returning it (a service I salute Audible for) but I would like a shot if I had wasted a whole credit on it.

  • The Society of the Sword Trilogy

  • By: Duncan M. Hamilton
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 31 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,145
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,070
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,066

When Soren is plucked from the streets and given a place at the prestigious academy of swordsmanship, he thinks his dream of being a great swordsman has become a possibility. However, with great intrigues unfolding all around him, Soren discovers that he is little more than a pawn to the ambitions of others.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Took a chance on a new author and....

  • By Graham on 27-11-17

Took a chance on a new author and....

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-11-17

I was not familiar with Mr. Hamilton's works but thought I would take a chance on a new author. It is not often that I can say that I was drawn in to the story by the narrator so quickly. The characterisations worked (for me at least) the pace was just right and the story and characters developed well. The pictures of the characters and story appeared in my mind with no problems, sometimes this is a hesitant process, but not in this case. I genuinely wanted to know what happened next so I just kept listening. Something of a shock when you consider the length (aka value for money) of the three volumes.

I will not spoil any one's pleasure by discussing the plot, characters of twists and turns other than to say buckle your swash and enjoy.

I shall be looking out for the next offerings from both author and narrator.

Only down side: I used the earlier slightly more compressed format and was plagues by loads of breaks, skips, jumps and odd noises. This was not the case in the past so whatever Audible have done to their production methods has not worked. The new high res format while clear take up an awful lot of space on portable devices. Why the step back? So be careful not to detract from an excellent audio book with a less than optimum presentation.

41 of 42 people found this review helpful

  • The Secret War: Spies, Codes and Guerrillas 1939 - 1945

  • By: Max Hastings
  • Narrated by: Steven Crossley
  • Length: 30 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 155
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 141

Examining the espionage and intelligence stories in World War II on a global basis, bringing together the British, American, German, Russian and Japanese histories. In The Secret War, Max Hastings examines the espionage and intelligence machines of all sides in World War II, and the impact of spies, code breakers and partisan operations on events.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Bored me to death

  • By mr on 02-04-16

All was not what it seemed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-17

Would you listen to The Secret War: Spies, Codes and Guerrillas 1939 - 1945 again? Why?

Yes, given the subject matter and the breath of the canvas it will be essential to listen again. There is just too much to absorb is a single run through and certainly not in a single session. Has some issues with the Russian names but it was well worth the effort to get to grips with it.

What did you like best about this story?

Not a story but totally absorbing history. I personally found the information presented from a number of differing perspectives very effective in helping to understand the subject a little better. Four dimensions chess will be easy after this.

Which character – as performed by Steven Crossley – was your favourite?

No characters as such but an excellent narration.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The whole thing makes one very reflective.

  • Fated

  • Alex Verus, Book 1
  • By: Benedict Jacka
  • Narrated by: Gildart Jackson
  • Length: 10 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 691
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 640
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 638

Camden, North London. A tangled, mangled junction of train lines, roads and waterways. Where minor celebrities hang out with minor criminals and where tourists and moody teenagers mingle. In the heart of Camden, where rail meets road meets leyline, you might find the Arcana Emporium, run by one Alex Verus. He won't sell you a wand or mix you a potion, but if you know what you're looking for, he might just be able to help.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Better than I expected

  • By Tod Werewolf on 25-04-16

Oh dear, another series I MUST follow

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-17

Where does Fated rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Interesting concepts, good story, engaging characters, top notch narration. The story flows well and draws you in to the world. Naturally there are some bumps in the road of the plot, but this is fantasy after all. This series promises to be a great respite from my real world that is really quite a long way from the London in the story. Just what is required when I can grab a few minutes.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Fated?

As a paid up arachnophobe I really felt quite drawn to this character, which was surprising. I will say no more.

What about Gildart Jackson’s performance did you like?

Good pace and characterisations. The female characters were identifiable as such but the voices were not a pastiche.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Just when you thought it was safe!

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Rex Regis

  • Imager Portfolio, Book 8
  • By: L. E. Modesitt Jr.
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 16 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17

The saga of the Imager Quaeryt, commander in the forces of Lord Bhayar, reaches a new climax as the great struggle to unify the continent of Lydar enters its final phase. Only the land of Khel remains uncommitted to Bhayar's rule.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not quite as good as predecessors

  • By Graham on 22-01-14

Not quite as good as predecessors

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-01-14

Would you listen to Rex Regis again? Why?

I found the Imager series captivating in concept and the narrator really brings the characters to life (for me at least). This episode draws the threads of the Imager series together well but I hope does not mark the end of the series.

What did you like best about this story?

After a slow start it got into its stride (matching the earlier book) and neatly gave a background to the society that was introduced to us in the first three books of the series.

Have you listened to any of William Dufris’s other performances? How does this one compare?

Excellent

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I downloaded it on the day it was released, that should say it all.

Any additional comments?

I personally found this eagerly awaited addition to the series rather too slow and ponderous to get going. It wasn't until the second part of the download that the story really started to provide the same attraction as the earlier books. That is not to say that if there are other books in the series that I won't be at the front of the queue.

  • The Prodigal Mage

  • Fisherman's Children, Book 1
  • By: Karen Miller
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 22 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11

The weather magic that holds Lur safe is failing, and the earth feels broken to those with the power to see. Among Lur's sorcerers, only Asher has the skill to mend the antique weather map that governs the seasons, keeping the land from being crushed by natural forces. Yet, when Asher risks his life to meddle with these dangerous magics, the crisis is merely delayed, not averted.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Needs new narration

  • By Graham on 01-04-13

Needs new narration

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-04-13

Regrettably I have not been able to get a grip on the story line as the narration is so poor that I can't stay with it long enough. The vast majority of the books in my Audible library have good to excellent narrators but this one is way off the mark. Main regret is that I purchased it too long ago to be eligible for the new exchange programme.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful